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Author Topic: Winter hammocking  (Read 989 times)

Offline Tomd

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Winter hammocking
« on: January 25, 2013, 07:50:34 pm »
OK, not really what you all do, but I found this very entertaining. It's Shug Emery, who I have mentioned before, and some buddies from www.hammockforums.net camping in Minnesota in some pretty cold weather last week. It's two parts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEzq2iidxNs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wszT8Sr4hI

Offline brianw

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2013, 10:25:31 pm »

Shug is a very well know hammock camper and winter hammock camper. 

They certainly had a great trip.  I think this is the third year in a row that the Minnesota Frozen Butt hang has been going on now.

There are few of us winter hammockers on this site (me included).

Cheers

Brian

Offline Tomd

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2013, 10:33:45 pm »
I have to say, it looked really cold, but also looked like they had a great time. I've been watching Shug's videos on YouTube for a while and just joined the hammocks forum. I really like that winter tarp he made. Do you know if there is anything commercially made that is comparable to it?

Offline jimmay

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2013, 10:40:30 pm »
Maybe the Old Man Winter by Wilderness Logics.

http://wildernesslogics.com/Oldman-Winter-Oldman-Winter.htm

Offline Tomd

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2013, 01:42:37 am »
Jimmay, thanks for the link. That one looks pretty close. Not sure I'm ready for hammocking yet, but I'm giving it a look.

Offline brianw

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2013, 10:28:28 am »
Most of the tarps that are used for hammocking (winter or 3 season) are made of silnylon or cuben fiber.  Both waterproof and non breathable fabrics.  So enclose your hammock with doors on the ends and close to the ground greatly reduces breathability and causes a large amount of frost to accumulate on the interior of the tarp. 

Generally speaking hammock people tend to be in the lightweight to ultra-light weight category.  So their gear choices are made with that fact in mind.  In winter, I choose to use a hybrid approach with my canvas wedge hot tent that I string my hammock through.  I use modern insulations and clothing.  My overall method of gear selection, is function first with other factors being secondary (cost, materials, weight, packability, etc).

At the end of the day, getting out in the woods in any season, is most important.  How you choose to do that gear wise, is a matter of personal preference.

Cheers

Brian
« Last Edit: January 26, 2013, 04:33:27 pm by brianw »

Offline Tomd

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2013, 03:13:48 am »
The big drawbacks I see to hammocks is (1) in winter you have the bulk of the top quilt, under quilt, winter sock, etc. The hammock itself and the tarp don't seem to take up much room based on the videos I've watched -mostly Shug's on YouTube. (2) You have to be sure there are trees where you are. Along the JMT (John Muir Trail in California along the Sierra Nevada) there seems to be long stretches above the tree line where no hammock is possible. The same is true of other places I've camped, so advance planning and info seems more important than if you have a tent.

Offline brianw

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2013, 11:18:53 am »
The big drawbacks I see to hammocks is (1) in winter you have the bulk of the top quilt, under quilt, winter sock, etc. The hammock itself and the tarp don't seem to take up much room based on the videos I've watched -mostly Shug's on YouTube. (2) You have to be sure there are trees where you are. Along the JMT (John Muir Trail in California along the Sierra Nevada) there seems to be long stretches above the tree line where no hammock is possible. The same is true of other places I've camped, so advance planning and info seems more important than if you have a tent.

The bulk of the top and underquilt is no worse then that of a winter rated sleeping bag and certainly a lot less than the usual 2 sleeping pads most winter campers use.  Not everyone uses a sock and if they do it's made of nylon and that compresses down quite small.  I agree that one needs trees to hang their hammocks.  However for hammockers they just plan their trips in places that have lots of trees.  There are creative ways to hang your hammock in almost any environment.

Cheers

Brian
« Last Edit: January 28, 2013, 06:14:28 pm by brianw »

Offline mbiraman

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2013, 12:18:46 pm »
+1 on what Brian has said. Its been my experience that there are more places to hang a hammock than pitch a tent. Sure there are places where there are no trees but most of the time people don't camp there. When you start using a hammock your perspective changes and you start to see possibilities you couldn't before when just reading info. I recently helped convert a neighbor of mine. He couldn't sleep on the ground anymore because of back issues. The hammock works for him . In my area there's very little level ground. I was there to witness the light go on when he realized you can camp on a hillside because you don't need level ground.

bill

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"Mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it."

Offline stuckinthesnow

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2013, 02:23:22 pm »
being able to camp on a hillside sure would make setting up camp easier. How long does it usually take you to set everything up?

Offline brianw

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2013, 05:51:24 pm »
being able to camp on a hillside sure would make setting up camp easier. How long does it usually take you to set everything up?

If setting up with just a tarp for a cold setup, the hammock, tarp and insulation can be setup in less than 10 minutes after any site prep work is done.  ie stomping down snow, or digging a snow trench between 2 trees for extra wind protection.

Cheers

Brian


Offline Frosty the Snowman

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2013, 11:37:24 pm »
Hey brianw,

I have read your posts on hot tenting with a hammock.  I have been hammocking for a while and absolutely love my bridge hammock.  My question is do you think a Snowtrekker tent with a door on each end would work for hot tenting with a hammock?  I have never seen a Snowtrekker tent in person but the dimensions would suggest that it would work.
Just wondering.

Offline brianw

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Re: Winter hammocking
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2013, 09:52:19 am »
Hey brianw,

I have read your posts on hot tenting with a hammock.  I have been hammocking for a while and absolutely love my bridge hammock.  My question is do you think a Snowtrekker tent with a door on each end would work for hot tenting with a hammock?  I have never seen a Snowtrekker tent in person but the dimensions would suggest that it would work.
Just wondering.

Hey Frosty

I use a bridge hammock as well and it fits perfectly inside my canvas wedge tent.  My wedge tent has overlapping doors with ties on both ends so hanging the hammock is straight forward.  When looking at my tent from the side, the ends are perfectly vertical.  I am not sure if the ends of the snowtrekker tents angle back to give a shorter ridge line length then the bottom edge.  This would make things more difficult to hang a hammock inside one.  The other issue is one of interior height.  My tent is 7' tall and has side pull outs for extra interior volume.  I don't know the specs of the typical snow trekker, but with a bridge hammock one has to have enough space to accommodate the spreader bars when getting in and out of the hammock. 

I will shoot an updated video of my hammock hot tent setup when I am out with it next weekend.

Cheers

Brian