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Author Topic: Candle for Emergency Heat  (Read 6026 times)

Offline moe

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Candle for Emergency Heat
« on: February 04, 2009, 09:37:00 pm »
I've heard it said many times, as well as having read  that an emergency  winter safety kit in your car should include candle(s) for heat in case you run out of gas or get stuck on those cold winter days or nights.   I've never been able to find  actual data that quantifies the effect of a burning candle(s) inside a car when it comes to heat production/ maintaining certain temperature.    Does anyone know of studies or experiments that would answer this question?

   
« Last Edit: February 05, 2009, 07:35:11 am by moe »

Offline Georgi

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009, 07:51:04 am »
No, but it gives you something to look at more than Btu production.

Sleeping out in that Quinzee with the candle burning , I felt like it helped but again maybe its so your mind eases more than heat.

Moe, with your talents and bush skills, you'd have no problem starting a fire beside the car big enough for someone to see and for you, if stranded, to gain some warmth from.  The advantage of the candle is if your not stuck near a stand of Birch or Cedars... even live wood will burn if you can get the fire hot enough.

If anything the smoke from it would definitely be like setting up a flare.
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Offline Haggis

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2009, 08:48:22 am »
If near an automobile, under most situations, one has an easily ignitable fuel in the tank and an easily accessible spark via the battery. Building a fire, or perhaps setting a spare tire afire ought not be a problem.

As to candles and blankets; I have a 90 year old Hudson’s Bay 4-point double blanket (the original blankets came as two blankets connected end to end, one was to tear them apart later) which I use when deer hunting. The candles (2), in the form of candle lanterns (see link below), are set alight and placed under a milk crate, I wrap the blanket snuggly about myself, and park my ample bottom on the crate. The candles will burn for 8 to 10 hours. One should be wont to believe that if such a configuration would work when hunting, it would as well work when stranded in an automobile.

One candle is more than enough in all but the worst weathers.

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Offline Haggis

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2009, 08:57:10 am »
I forgot to mention the obvious; the blanket is to encapsulate the milk crate as well as the person setting there on.
“It is tedious to live; it is tedious to die; it is tedious to c**p in deep snow”
Old Norwegian Observation

Offline wilderness gal

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2009, 12:18:40 pm »
I went to a Winter Wilderness Survival Course last weekend and there were mixed feelings on candles.  Some folks just loved them and felt they made them a bit  warmer in their shelters.  Some were afraid of dozing and setting themselves a blaze, this would be me.  We were told that last year a lady became very ill from burning a candle in an enclosed space.  It was advised to purchase good clean burning candles such as beeswax if one feels the need to burn them and do so with good ventilation.  There were folks who just enjoyed having the light and the company of their candle.  I would give it a try, test your gear!  Go out on a dark road, shut down the car and sit a spell with your candle.  It is a personal thing whether you will feel the candle served you well or not!  Give it a whirl!  One of the bestest things I learned from the course was to test your survival gear before you need it to survive!  It may not be the security you thought it was!
Is a frogs arse water tight?

Offline Andy

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2009, 01:25:28 pm »
...test your survival gear before you need it to survive!  It may not be the security you thought it was!
Excellent advice!
When the first Europeans landed in the Americas, they described it as one vast untouched wilderness. This was about the highest compliment they could pay to the Native people who had lived there for thousands of years. -Bill Mason

Offline jaunty

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2009, 08:37:48 am »


Haggis -- I assume that the breathability of the blanket allows the candles adequate oxygen.  Is that right? 



Offline Haggis

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2009, 09:12:27 am »
Aye, that and my endless figgeting about, or my opening of the blanket folds when I've become too warm.
“It is tedious to live; it is tedious to die; it is tedious to c**p in deep snow”
Old Norwegian Observation

Offline Dukeswharf

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2009, 09:13:58 am »
One of the bestest things I learned from the course was to test your survival gear before you need it to survive!  It may not be the security you thought it was!

Absolutely!! In the field is the LAST place you wish to find out that your equipment does not work!


Offline dks

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2009, 11:14:03 am »
I keep a UCO candle lantern in my vehicle for emergency use. One thing I discovered on my last winter camping trip was that cheap candles burn with a very high flame. The flame was reaching over the heat shield on the the lantern. Even cutting the wick down only solved the problem for a couple of minutes.

So, if you keep a candle for use in a vehicle, I suggest a candle lantern (much safer) and also buy good candles. I think you can't go wrong with the UCO brand candles.

Offline FlatbowMB

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2009, 12:12:53 pm »
Further to what DKS said, I'd also recommend the UCO candle lanterns, and specifically with their beeswax candles which burn considerably longer and cleaner than the paraffin ones do.  Using a candle lantern rather than an open flame will reduce the likelihood of setting things ablaze.  Just be sure to hang it by it's bail in a spot where other things won't come into direct dontact with it.

Offline Tomd

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2009, 01:28:58 pm »
I also have a candle lantern similar to the UCO that I bought back in the 80's. Not sure about the candles-I have a few left I bought back then. They seem to burn for about 6 hours maybe with a low flame. They don't put out a lot of heat or light, but are enough to see in a small tent. Not quite bright enough for reading, but a nice light to just brighten up the tent a bit.  I can hang mine in a two person tent from one of the loops on the top without it getting the fabric too warm.  I check it every now and then and don't run it more than an hour or two at the most.

Offline Mike

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2009, 09:48:14 pm »
I regularly burn a candle in a lantern all night through out the year. I like the ambiance that it gives off. In the summer in my nylon tent it also controls dew that tends to build up inside of my tent. I would not recommend an open candle. Yes the beeswax candles burn longer but they have a greater tendency to drip and clog up the spring inside of the holder. Because of that and they are nearly twice as much I will stick with the "regular" candles. The candles really do not give off that much heat. Much of the heat escapes the confines of the tent by the time the occupants can reap its benefits.
Mike

Offline JAK

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2009, 11:05:45 pm »
I think a candle gives off about the same as a person, depending on the candle.

I know some ice fishermen that use a bag of tealight candles instead of a stove.
They start with a whole bunch lit, and then blow most of them out.

In my car kit I have a big can of apple juice and bag of tealights.
Plus some wool blankets and stuff like wool underwear and hats,mitts,socks.

Offline yukon

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Re: Candle for Emergency Heat
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2009, 06:45:17 pm »
I used one last weekend in a snow shelter. I have no data on whether it raised the temperature, but it sure transformed a gloomy snowcave into a magical space. I could have sworn I felt heat from it, as my son also maintained, but considering our sleeping bags , i know that was psychosomatic.

Hey, easy to light a cigar with though.