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Author Topic: Outside stove air  (Read 1764 times)

Offline Moondog55

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2017, 11:21:06 pm »
I don't think using a "Rocket" style stove precludes using an air inlet duct, in fact as a good draw on a rocket stove pulls so much air I think it would be doubly advantageous

Offline Model97

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2017, 09:37:57 pm »
I'm thinking the benefits of having the stove help turn over & refresh the tent air may outweigh those related to potential stove efficiency.  It isn't on a duty cycle after all, and is going to get fed and burn continuously anyway. And, a cotton tent is going to allow air transfer regardless. 

Offline Undersky

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2017, 11:05:09 pm »
I agree with your assertion, Model97, about the definite benefits of air turn-over & refreshment within the tent, and that the partial vacuum within the tent that is produced by the stove draw helps this air refreshment. As you allude, some of this air turn over or refreshment is going to occur just because of the hot air leaking out the upper parts of the cotton tent, while cold air infiltrates the lower parts.

Now that we've hashed this out a bit, maybe "efficiency" is not the best word. Maybe "increased temperature/comfort" might be the real potential benefits of piped-in combustion air. If this is the case, the added heat that having piped-in combustion air may bring will only be an overall benefit when it is very cold and the limited stove heat output is being challenged by outside temperature, cooking requirements, lots of drying clothing, etc., as well as the desirable cold air infiltration through the cotton.

Another way to look at it is when both the (1) stove's heat output and (2) the factors that use up your heat, are maxed out the piped-in combustion air can result in the tent living space being a little warmer, all other things being equal.

We'll be screwing up a good thing if we lose too much refreshing air in our tents.

Likely I am being too particular about all of this, but it is neat to have a place to think about the finer points of hot tent heating with people who have an interest. Thanks!

Offline Moondog55

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2017, 11:36:05 pm »
Not all of us are going to be using a cotton tent tho
I am going to be using a double skin synthetic tent with valances and in this case the airflow benefits of a dedicated combustion air inlet might be much greater

Offline Dave Hadfield

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2017, 07:54:06 pm »
I've heard of this in traditional tipis -- a tube of birch bark used as a pipe to bring air to the stove or fire pit. Reduces drafts flowing past the occupants.

But in a hot tent you don't generally need it, particularly if the living space is on the other side of the stove from the door.

If you have the door, then the stove, and then the living space, in that order, then air leaks in around the door and goes into the stove and never makes its way back to where you are sitting.

In general you want your toboggan as light as possible, so you try to avoid single-purpose gear.

Dave

Offline 300winmag

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2017, 07:18:21 pm »
Well gents, I never thought my suggestion for cold air intake tube for tent stoves would generate much discussion. I guess I didn't gauge the interest. Also it appears most feel it's better to "leave well enough alone" and "If it ain't broke don't fix it."

I can see that not using a dedicated cold air intake tube would preclude CO buildup but has that problem ever arisen in a woodbutning hot tent stove?

Eric B.

Offline bushman

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2017, 10:09:17 am »
Since smoke from an open tipi fire has not been mentioned, I feel it is necessary to add a few lines. As I recall, the reason that First Nations people put some sort of outside air tunnel to their fire pit was to get rid of the smoke that would linger in the tipi without it. Tipi's can be miserable when there is not enough draw to vent smoke out the top of the tipi, red eyes etc. Stone lined tunnels covered with dirt were often used. Fuel efficiency may be a beneficial bi product of the primary goal of smoke removal.

Offline rbinhood

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Re: Outside stove air
« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2017, 01:15:03 pm »
Wood smoke is a mix of toxic chemicals, not unlike cigarette smoke. Whether it be a tent, yurt, tipi, or some other small shelter, I personally don't care to expose my lungs to it anymore than is necessary. A friend who was a chimney sweep, and never smoked a day in his life, died from lung cancer at an early age, most likely from breathing the dust from the chimneys he cleaned.

Another friend had a hospital supply business, which included supplying oxygen concentrators to people with breathing problems. The concentrators pulled room air through a filter, and then increased the oxygen level through some process. He said that whenever he went to a house with wood heat to service the concentrator, the filters would be black. This was in houses with airtight woodstoves and good piping. The simple act of opening the stove door to feed more wood caused a momentary puff of smoke to enter the homes. Over time, especially in Winter, when people try to keep their homes sealed up as tight as possible, that little bit of smoke would build up, contaminating the inside air the house.

Many years ago, I heated with wood heat using a high quality wood burning furnace. By the end of the heating season, you could write your name in the gray film that developed on the Tupperware plastic. After that experience, I said no more wood heat.

I am not terribly worried about the small amount of time I spend in my hot tent, but I try as much as possible to avoid breathing wood smoke at all costs.