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Author Topic: Homemade Mukluks Help  (Read 805 times)

Offline TheRuggedWrangler

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Re: Homemade Mukluks Help
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2017, 07:29:54 pm »
$700 USD for a full hide? I near fell out of my chair too. How much hide would one need to make a set of "typical" mukluks?

TRW

Offline Kalvik

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Re: Homemade Mukluks Help
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2017, 08:07:00 pm »
$700 USD is a very good price. I have seen a full, smoke-tanned moose hide going for $3,250 CDN. The best stuff comes from the Cree in Quebec, IF you can find anyone who still puts in all that labour to do the job right. Like a lot of traditional things these days, it's the old folks who have the skills. The youngsters have other interests

You should only need two to four square feet, depending on whether you want to do just the soles or the uppers as well.

Online Moondog55

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Re: Homemade Mukluks Help
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2017, 09:02:15 pm »
Well I thought it was a lot of money but as you say there is a lot of work involved in the tradition tanning process
If only 4 square feet is needed then maybe a single kangaroo hide will do.
0.7m<2 is about 6 ft<2 which may leave enough for a double layer sole
Which leads to another question, are mukluks ever made with a fur on hide?
Is there much difference between chrome tanning and vegetable tanning where very cold temperatures are expected?
I live in Victoria; an Australian state where kangaroo hunting is forbidden [ despite them being a bit of a pest in many places] so I can't do my own tanning
A single Red roo hide is about $100- chrome tanned and $120- to $150- vegetable tanned, fur on about $150- to- $190- all depending on size, Grey kangaroo a bit lower in cost by about 10%

Offline Kalvik

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Re: Homemade Mukluks Help
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2017, 10:22:23 pm »
Traditionally, the Inuit made the soles of their mukluks (the proper term is "kamiks") out of the skins of bearded seals. In later years they began to use moose hide when it was available, but bearded seal is more water resistant. In fact the seal skin boots could, if desired, be made in a completely waterproof style with the uppers scraped of all the hair.

The uppers of the non-waterproof boots were, and still are, made from either seal skin or caribou skin, with the fur left on the outside.

As to your other questions - I'm afraid I have no answers for you. We have very few kangaroo around here!

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Homemade Mukluks Help
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2017, 01:24:07 am »
Something to be aware of about smoke tan moose hide, is the hide is really porous, so it is great for deep cold condition, but any temps around freezing and they soak ups lot of water. there was a lot of different ways of tanning hide traditionally, bark tanning( using willow bark) was one so was urine tanning. The thing with some smoked than moose is it is a lot of work and steps are sometime skipped, like thinning the hide, and if it stays in really thick, it can become quite spongy hence the ability to soak up some water!! You can buy "regular" tan moose and elk and deer, and that should be better. That is what Steiger uses!!