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Author Topic: A "new" axe  (Read 570 times)

Offline AunNordDuNord

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A "new" axe
« on: November 21, 2017, 11:34:23 AM »
Wile on a trip to BC, I went to visit a woodworker/sawmiller/toolcolector.... And found that axe in on the wall... 1960-70 Hults Bruks 5 stars Arvika 4 1/2 pounds racing axe in near mint condition, the only thing needed was a leather sheet and get the edge cleaned and sharpened... So after looking at some wood, I pickup a few piece and Steve "said what about the axe?" I told him I didn't know if I had enough$$ on me and I told him to tell me what was the price for the wood selected and then I had $50 left... So I guess I paid $50 for it....

https://photos.app.goo.gl/3ntJl6zsfJ4BRghn1

P.s. I also score that Pioneer double wool cruiser in mint condition for $45....

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2017, 02:17:28 PM »
Nice find.

So how is a racing axe different from a "normal" axe?
www.canoepaddler.me.uk for canoe tripping and winter trekking photos and fireboxes

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2017, 02:32:42 PM »
Nice find.

So how is a racing axe different from a "normal" axe?

No idea. I mean the now a day racing axe have longer(wider) cutting edge, sometime phantom bevels, a through the head safety pin and I'm sure they have weight and size requirements... This one I have is what it was called.

I found this on the net:"Nice find, thanks for sharing! Originally its own forge in Sweden, Arvika created the 5-Star Racing axe for use on Australian hardwood. The racing pattern was also popular for lumberjack sports like the standing block chop. In the early 1960s, Arvika ceased production and Hults Bruk purchased the brand and 5-Star pattern. Hults Bruk continued selling the Arvika 5-Star in select markets, including Canada.

The maker’s mark is a cold stamp used before 1988, so this axe could have been made sometime between 1960 and 1988. I don’t have an exact date for the Arvika stamp with the stars on the poll. But I’m guessing this one is closer to 1960-70s."

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2017, 02:40:33 PM »
here is an other source of info.... http://www.osborneaxes.com.au/conventional_grinds.html
I just sharpened mine with a nice convex bevel, I don't plan on racing it but I want the edge to be tough. I can shave hair on my arm with it, but not cleanly slice paper!!

Online Moondog55

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2017, 03:37:38 PM »
A Racing axe has a wide cutting edge and a shallow wedge.
Cutting competitions are still strong here
The species used in competitions is usually E. Regnans

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus_regnans

This trees wood has a very straight grain and when wet and green is very soft, a sharp axe can penetrate very deeply. There should be a quite abrupt shoulder at the axes spine edge to facillitate chip shedding
I have seen axe men demonstrating how sharp their axes are by shaving thier chins with an axe before a competition and these axes usually travel in a heavy padded case not just a sheath over the blades edge

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2017, 03:42:35 PM »
A Racing axe has a wide cutting edge and a shallow wedge.
Cutting competitions are still strong here
The species used in competitions is usually E. Regnans

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus_regnans

This trees wood has a very straight grain and when wet and green is very soft, a sharp axe can penetrate very deeply. There should be a quite abrupt shoulder at the axes spine edge to facillitate chip shedding
I have seen axe men demonstrating how sharp their axes are by shaving thier chins with an axe before a competition and these axes usually travel in a heavy padded case not just a sheath over the blades edge

Yes indeed, I saw the care they take of there tools, it is a bit crazy... Same goes with there saws, Babied like nothing else.... Mine won't be babied, but I will take care of it none the less and I put a more all purpose edge on it to be able to take some abuse!!

Offline rbinhood

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2017, 06:40:24 AM »
AND, I hope you wore a mask when you committed this robbery. :)
Such a deal you made on a fine axe and a very nice wool jacket. Lucky man!

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2017, 10:51:22 AM »
AND, I hope you wore a mask when you committed this robbery. :)
Such a deal you made on a fine axe and a very nice wool jacket. Lucky man!

Nope, in plain day light....  8)

Offline kiggy

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2017, 04:11:18 PM »
great find. how many axes do you have now, 10?

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2017, 06:42:32 PM »
Hahaha, how did you know.... but two don't have handles yet... One I found on a dirt rd going on a canoe trip, I was following a grader and I saw something comping out of the dirt... It was an old hatchet... I will restore it and give it to Sophie!!

Offline kiggy

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2017, 09:03:27 PM »
just kidding, nice collection.

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2017, 11:52:09 PM »
just kidding, nice collection.

I do have a few axes, they all get used, But that new one might become the one that follows me on multi day trips canoeing and winter camping. I will still bring my small Wetterling or my GB forest axe on day trips!! I like having an axe with me in the bush!

Offline Dave Hadfield

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2017, 08:15:28 PM »
I know what you mean about spotting a good axe head and buying it. I have a couple on my bench right now, even though I have enough to last me the rest of my life.

Is it a splitting axe? 4.5 lbs seems like a lot.

Online Moondog55

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2017, 09:28:43 PM »
I know what you mean about spotting a good axe head and buying it. I have a couple on my bench right now, even though I have enough to last me the rest of my life.

Is it a splitting axe? 4.5 lbs seems like a lot.

Most of my axes are 4.5 to 5 pounds, here that is considered the most useful; anything smaller is usually relegated to trimming not cutting. You don't see many small or LW axes in Australia and I have seen competition axes to 6+ pounds [ never used one tho, I'm simply not strong enough through the back and shoulders to use a 6+ pound axe] my kindling hatchets must have 2.5 pound heads
Different conditions call for different styles and tools, my favourite axe is a Plumb Tasmanian 2.2kilo head on a composite shaft and almost time to re-haft it after 10 years use. Chasing a decent hickory handle is the hard part, the ones I have seen lately are expensive rubbish

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: A "new" axe
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2017, 11:19:00 PM »
I know what you mean about spotting a good axe head and buying it. I have a couple on my bench right now, even though I have enough to last me the rest of my life.

Is it a splitting axe? 4.5 lbs seems like a lot.

They call it a racing axe. Use for timber sports. But it is basically a felling axe!