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Topics - JeffOYB

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http://www.ebay.com/itm/JARVINEN-LAPPONIA-XC-skis-230-cm-/371115388521?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5668336e69

...I bought the 240's they had.

Gotta give em a try.

Have never seen these skis for sale in the USA.

Of course overseas they go up to 280cm but these should work for an honest test.

Do they glide in deep snow? We'll find out!

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Back Country Skiing Discussion / Forest Skis for sale!
« on: January 13, 2014, 07:25:22 pm »
I'm listing my Forest Skis for sale on eBay. I've had em up there awhile, no action. Nobody knows what they are, I suppose. But I suddenly remembered that you guys might like them.

They're only 210's which doesn't seem like "true" Forest length, but they are the ONLY pair of such skis I've EVER seen in the USA, so I wasn't going to look a gift horse and I bought them.

If I end up keeping them I'll install newer bindings on them. They now have NNN-1's. They're mounted tip-heavy. The bases have a half dozen big scratches.

I'm selling them because we just don't get the deep snow around here. ...I *might* jump on a pair of "real" 250's or something someday, though, just to try them.

These do have the neat Forest shape and a soft tip.

$120.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rare-Forest-Skis-210cm-Jarvinen-Lamponnia-XC-ski-nordic-Support-Lore-/271342337846?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f2d437f36

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Back Country Skiing Discussion / Any news on Forest Skis?
« on: December 12, 2013, 06:39:16 pm »
Anyone see any 230-280cm Forest Skis in North America lately?

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Back Country Skiing Discussion / Long distance fast light ski camping?
« on: November 27, 2013, 03:46:18 pm »
Bike packing is the rave new bike sport. With just 10 lbs of extra gear the dudes can go out on their bikes for day after day. The new bikepacks don't use any racks and are light and don't hurt bike-handling. People are loving it!

I haven't read anything about BC skiers adopting the "go far fast and light" approach that the new Ultralight gear might offer.

I was doing some of the math and it seems that carrying 2 days of food and winter gear even if of the new light breed still adds up to enough weight that ones speed and range is curtailed. Like, you can get it down to 25 lbs, finish weight of 17 lbs, say, ballpark.

I find that I can ski in the technical singletrack backcountry, with friends sharing the trail-breaking work, about 40 miles a day, max. I'd like to go for 50 miles and it could likely be done. But that's with carrying only a 1-day load of 15 lbs that drops to 5 lbs by the finish. That kind of weight doesn't impede me or shorten my range. But I notice that I'm darn sensitive to weight. It seems that 20 lbs would drop my range to 25 miles and double any misery factor. My "ski joy" for all-day trail-breaking hovers around a 10-15 lb pack.

Now... What about a sled? I know that sleds are popular for a lot of winter ski camping. But our mode has a twist: we ski only SINGLETRACK. ...Can a sled be set up for technical descending/cornering on hilly singletrack? I use a crossed-pole light sled that is pretty nimble but I haven't ever considered technical skiing with it. We push the limits of 55mm midlength skis and NNN-BC bindings on a low-top touring boot with light/minimal pivot cuff.

A sled might, just might, give us back our distance-range and let us do back to back 30-mile days with an overnight.

Whattaya think?

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What's the minimum needed to get a homestyle ski trail back into shape after a blizzard?

3 snowshoe passes?

I'm talking: ski track plus firm poling.

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I just tromped a loop around my yard during this huge snowstorm we're getting and I noticed something lame about how my 210cm Forest skis are performing. Jarvinen Lapponia ("Rock") skis model. They're mounted so the tip swings down. When I tromp thru the deep stuff I can tell the skis want to work nice but the snow on the top-deck of the forward part of the skis just makes the tips fling downward and drag with each step. A normal XC ski has a weight-forward tip to keep the tips in the tracks. That's NOT deep snow skiing! I think I'd prefer to have the TAILS stay down -- LIKE A SNOWSHOE! -- to help track LIKE A RUDDER and to have the tips shed their snowload with each step, rising out of the deep like porpoises... :) I'd be happy to remount the bindings further forward to give a tail-drag if that seems like a good idea. I might just test anyway, but would rather not drill more holes if it's be tried before and is dumb. ???

PS: I remounted one of them 1.5" forward, to give forward balance, but once boots were in they were still tip-heavy -- but maybe just due to the rubber-stopper -- far less so than before, anyway. They didn't seem to handle much differently in the deep snow. Maybe the tail-heavy one was a little better. Maybe I should remount the other 2" forward. ??

PPS: I do notice that these skis have rather zero grip. They have a small grip section. I suppose I could add kickwax fore'n'aft. Is there a fairly easy way to add your own extra nowax grip? A friend said he uses an exacto blade to slice in rearward facing slits to refresh worn out nowax tread.

--JP

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Snowshoeing Discussion / What wrecks snowshoe rawhide?
« on: February 02, 2011, 02:31:22 pm »
I have nice Michigans and I blew thru a bunch of the rawhide on them a couple years ago, but I forget why.

My hunch is that I let the varnish fall off. I do recall using them with the rawhide raw a couple times. Then I was probably surprised to see em decomposing under foot. Is that how the meltdown goes?

I've since revarnished and I've repaired all bad connections with zipties. Got a dozen zipties in there now. Some also varnished over. I hope it all holds together now.

A friend wants to borrow them for a loaded hike / sled-pull into the woods maybe 5 miles each way. I'm hoping the dissolution won't immediately commence again.

Well, I'm taking them out today NOW in this huge snowstorm for some fun. We'll see how they hold up.

--JP

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Back Country Skiing Discussion / Adult pulk for skiing and skating?
« on: January 27, 2011, 06:41:33 pm »
I was thinking of getting an ice-fishing plastic sled. Those 6-foot black barge things. Then screwing long skis to the bottom of it. Then attaching crossed conduit with heavy bungie thru it and a padded waist-belt.

Could a good skier pull an adult in a such a pulk?

One could glue foam pad into the bottom of the sled to make it nice. And install a Thermarest chair to give back support for the passenger.

Now, to get extra power and control, one could build a chair-like hand-hold scaffold in the back, like a dog-sled or spark-sled. Then a 3rd person could ride the tails of the skis and control the back of the sled, kicking along for added propulsion and PUSHING up any steep hills.

I was thinking that this kind of rig might work best on the ICE. I was out Nordic ice-skating a few weeks ago and thought I could just fly along with my skates and poles and pull a couple adults in a sled behind me. They could be nestled in blankets and enjoy the moonlight or something.

The capper might be if another padded waist-band was attached to the first by another heavy-duty bungie so you could have TWO skaters or skiers!

Mush mush!

(Would this work? Anyone try such a thing?)

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Back Country Skiing Discussion / Multi-pocket mod for Woolrich thick shirt?
« on: December 05, 2010, 01:27:12 pm »
Here's an idea...

When I go on a long day-ski I wear a wool shirt and a fanny pack. I store my lunch and waxes and water bottle in the fanny pack and keep my map and who knows what all in my shirt chest pockets.

When I want to stop and do something I end up always having to rotate my fanny pack around to get at my goodies.

I propose a shirt that might eliminate the need for a fanny pack.

I recently bought a thick Woolrich shirt (not as thick as a Shirt-Jac) that has FOUR BIG pockets on the front. They bellows a bit. It doesn't have a tail so it's meant to wear outside.

So right there I've almost eliminated my fanny pack. I can keep cellphone, digicam and map in my big chest pockets. And several slices of my patented winter-chow Hawaiian supercharged pizza in my two lower pockets. Maybe some sticks of wax, too, and my Leatherman and some zipties and a bit of duct-tape and bandaids.

...But I'm thinking of adding a few things to this shirt which might put it right over the top into perfection...

I plan on sewing an elastic-topped water-bottle pouch on either side of the lower rear corners of the shirt. They'll be a bit like bike jersey rear pockets. So now I can carry two water bottles.

Then I'd sew a larger "game pouch" into the center of the lower-rear. Now I can carry an extra hat, gloves, hankie, vest, headlamp.

Sound good?

Sure, I could carry a water-bladder rucksack for all that stuff.

Lately, I've been carrying both a fanny pack -- for my "swing around" quickly accessible goodies. And a small ruck for my dry clothes that I don't need as often. I haven't used a bladder-pack yet but I have one. I could insulate the hose and keep water in it.

(Our trips are usually on 10-30F days and my water/cokes haven't frozen.)

But somehow I think that I could save a few pounds and maybe have a handier, tidier solution if I carried it all in my shirt.

But maybe a loaded shirt would slop around and swing from my shoulders?

I do find the fanny pack and other waistbands at present to be a bit annoying, so a shirt solution would get rid of those.

Who knows! Anyone else try such a fix?

If it worked great, maybe the concept would be good for warm-season apparel, too.

I was thinking I could even sell a few such modified shirts. Buy em up at thrift shops. If I could find several in the same color then my added pockets could match the rest of the shirt. Whoa! :)

--JP / http://outyourbackdoor.com

ps I think I'll crosspost this to the clothing section...

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Winter Camping Clothing / Multi-pocket mod for Woolrich thick shirt?
« on: December 05, 2010, 01:23:33 pm »
Here's an idea...

When I go on a long day-ski I wear a wool shirt and a fanny pack. I store my lunch and waxes and water bottle in the fanny pack and keep my map and who knows what all in my shirt chest pockets.

When I want to stop and do something I end up always having to rotate my fanny pack around to get at my goodies.

I propose a shirt that might eliminate the need for a fanny pack.

I recently bought a thick Woolrich shirt (not as thick as a Shirt-Jac) that has FOUR BIG pockets on the front. They bellows a bit. It doesn't have a tail so it's meant to wear outside.

So right there I've almost eliminated my fanny pack. I can keep cellphone, digicam and map in my big chest pockets. And several slices of my patented winter-chow Hawaiian supercharged pizza in my two lower pockets. Maybe some sticks of wax, too, and my Leatherman and some zipties and a bit of duct-tape and bandaids.

...But I'm thinking of adding a few things to this shirt which might put it right over the top into perfection...

I plan on sewing an elastic-topped water-bottle pouch on either side of the lower rear corners of the shirt. They'll be a bit like bike jersey rear pockets. So now I can carry two water bottles.

Then I'd sew a larger "game pouch" into the center of the lower-rear. Now I can carry an extra hat, gloves, hankie, vest, headlamp.

Sound good?

Sure, I could carry a water-bladder rucksack for all that stuff.

Lately, I've been carrying both a fanny pack -- for my "swing around" quickly accessible goodies. And a small ruck for my dry clothes that I don't need as often. I haven't used a bladder-pack yet but I have one. I could insulate the hose and keep water in it.

(Our trips are usually on 10-30F days and my water/cokes haven't frozen.)

But somehow I think that I could save a few pounds and maybe have a handier, tidier solution if I carried it all in my shirt.

But maybe a loaded shirt would slop around and swing from my shoulders?

I do find the fanny pack and other waistbands at present to be a bit annoying, so a shirt solution would get rid of those.

Who knows! Anyone else try such a fix?

If it worked great, maybe the concept would be good for warm-season apparel, too.

I was thinking I could even sell a few such modified shirts. Buy em up at thrift shops. If I could find several in the same color then my added pockets could match the rest of the shirt. Whoa! :)

--JP / http://outyourbackdoor.com

ps I think I'll crosspost this to the skiing section...

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I'm starting to explore the Surplus Winter Clothing scene.

So far I've dabbled in a bit of the US clothing info. I'm still just looking around for good sources. I also do retailing myself so I've put in word to my wholesalers asking if they have good winter stuff.

I'm wondering if there are particular items from various countries and periods that are known to be the best stuff.

Now, I'm partly wandering astray of the "what to wear while skiing/hauling" mark, but I'm not far off base for ice-fishing.  : )  ...I would actually like something that looks decent when worn around town.

I'm partial to the real fur hood trim. And a real fur trooper hat.

(I have a roadkill fox fur that I wonder if I could DIY into a trooper hat. Or maybe it would be better for everyone if I just bought a muskrat one. I see them on eBay for about $60.)

Winter surplus "snappy on the street" apparel ideas appreciated! But any superdooper tips appreciated as well. (Altho I know I could just search here for "anorak" "mitt" and "mukluk".)

--JP
outyourbackdoor.com

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Anyone here know of or HAVE any forest skis?

I believe they're Finnish.

The concept has been around awhile. It's a ski that's like 280cm long and normal/wide width -- 65mm, say. They're used apparently mostly in springtime to stay on top of the snow. --To go bear-hunting with! They're also used mostly with RUBBER high boots. Crazy stuff!

I've never seen a pair but I've enjoyed reading about them and would likely buy if I ever had the chance. Then I'd be sure to proudly strap them to a roof rack when going on a trip... : )

Here's more: http://outyourbackdoor.com/article.php?id=556

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Back Country Skiing Discussion / New "Ski Touring" technique theory!
« on: March 27, 2009, 01:43:38 pm »
Hey, check out the huge new report I put up at my OYB site about Ski Technique Theory.

My general idea is that Touring Technique is simply not taught anywhere! Yet it's what most skiers do!

The official way to teach skiing goes from Beg to Int to Adv, all using the Racing Technique concepts.

It emphasizes total weight shift and total weight throwing onto poles and ab-crunching to pole. It's not good for sight-seeing or chatting and isn't designed for that. It's for racing. Which few people do. It's also REALLY HARD for "normal" people to do! And it's not at all suitable for BC skiing or homestyle ungroomed trails (where people just ski-in their own tracks). It's an amazing situation if you think about it. Which I have. Ripe for discussion anyway!

I say that Tourers need a technique that is easy and low-effort and suitable for soft, unstable trails and useful with an upright posture. And I say that Tourers naturally develop a ski style to fit those needs. But I note that all instructors and books say that this technique is bad and wrong!

Time for a change, I think. (Or at least a further chat.)

A top instructor told me that, yes, they teach with a race-style basis but that they use a progression which lets learners pick how much they want to get into the race-tech. Actually, I still say he's wrong. At no point in the official progression is a Real World "casual dayskier" technique given any respect!

For instance, my ideas were taught back in the days of wood skis. Well, many people still use wood skis! The old methods were also used for ungroomed trails---which most still are. (Even races used to be just "fore-run."

Anyway, my specifics are that a 2-Step Double Pole needs to be taught. And an upright Delayed Kick Diagonal needs to be taught. Also, Pendulum Poling.

And even for racers an easier skate technique is out there that is rarely mentioned: the Delayed V1, where you pole then kick --- it's a fast, restful V1 used for flatter terrain. Very common among citizen skiers. Not pictured in any book or taught anywhere. Only a few references to it in any media at all.

A main idea I have is that enough different timings are not being taught. It's like people are being taught about a couple different kinds of 3-speed bikes when there's a nice 5-speed out there to give them more options.

Whew!

Here's a link to further details: http://outyourbackdoor.com/article.php?id=1145

Yeah, I drone on, and have to cut my Theory report in half, but it'll do for now.

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Snowshoeing Discussion / I just put up 3 YouTubes about snowshoes...
« on: February 16, 2009, 07:15:04 pm »
Hi... Cool winter site! Winter culture is what I like. Too many folks here in Michigan complain about winter like they were Floridians...ahem...

I just put up 3 videos about snowshoes. I set them up as being about the 3 main types of snowshoes and I show each of em in action...

I also just put up 2 videos of key tips for getting the good fun in XC skiing...

Have at it!

http://www.youtube.com/user/JeffOYB

--JP

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