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Messages - yardsale

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1
General Winter Camping Discussion / Re: Chimney
« on: February 04, 2020, 07:53:13 pm »
Changing from a  3" pipe  to a tapered 3" to 4" tapered pipe made a HUGE difference with our Four dog stove.

2
Back Country Skiing Discussion / Re: My backcountry ski(s) setup
« on: January 15, 2020, 09:01:25 am »
Tuas were nice turning boards.  Soft.    It is interesting that all the bc stuff now is big and heavy except for the Vole Vector which now goes for $700 or so.  Other bc skis are stuck in the xc mode with double camber and no tip or tail rocker.  They turn but nowhere near as easily as the Vectors.  A word on camber.  IMO, camber works only when you are on a firm surface where you can compress,  then release for glide. On soft bc surfaces, there is no  platform to compress the ski in the first place, not very useful in that setting.



3
Back Country Skiing Discussion / Re: My backcountry ski(s) setup
« on: January 13, 2020, 08:09:40 am »
Vole Vectors, 3pin cable, light plastic boots , now from Scott.   Vectors have become VERY pricy.  If I were looking today I would look at  Kom Altai skis.

4
Can't recall how to post photos but search "meltback from stove posted on 5/27/18 for my strategy.   Three of four contact points with the snow are outside the heated space and are quite stable. The forth is sufficiently away from the stove that it doesn't melt much. I put a piece of foil on top of the pole end to further reduce movement.  Works well.

5
Winter Camping Clothing / Re: "Travel" clothing v.s. "Camp" clothing
« on: December 22, 2019, 08:50:19 am »
Down booties and one wool shirt I wear as an outer layer in case I get too close to the stove.  Other than that it is just various layers I would wear in the field.

6
Winter Camping Clothing / Re: In praise of synthetic clothing
« on: December 17, 2019, 06:09:43 pm »
I had a copy of that book at one time.  Sad that it is gone.

7
Fire and Woodstoves / Re: Your favorite wood processing and fire tips?
« on: December 16, 2019, 10:57:45 am »
For sure.  Using another stick of wood works fine and you don't have to carry another tool in with you.

8
Fire and Woodstoves / Re: Your favorite wood processing and fire tips?
« on: December 14, 2019, 08:32:03 am »
  When splitting small pieces of wood, I position the axe where I want on the end, then use another piece as a mallet to drive the axe. Easier and safer than taking a swing at a small target.  Also want to sing the praises of my 17" Fiskars axe. I am mindful of the reverence for traditional ways in this forum but the  handle on this axe is indestructible and it splits like a dream

9
Fire and Woodstoves / Re: Your favorite wood processing and fire tips?
« on: December 11, 2019, 05:15:25 pm »
 I get the same effect, I think, by finding a low "v" in a tree and feeding the saw log through that.  For me it is essential to have the saw log immobilized and stable enough to use two hands on the sawl.

10
Tents and Shelters / Re: Need a larger Snowtrekker tent?
« on: November 23, 2019, 08:11:30 am »
So you and BV disagree.  If I think of our minimalist sleeping footprint it is 4' x  6'  in the upper  right quarter of an 8 x 8 space, leaving  a 4 x 8 space on the left side of the tent for stove and gear.  Not sure if there would be space for a well in front of the stove like we have in our 8 x 11 Snowtrekker.   All this trouble for a weight reduction from 23 to 16 lbs.  and $900 to boot.

Yardsale

There is a Snowtrekker Minimalist listed for sale in the Classified section.  No word in the thread if it sold or not.  You could always inquire by sending the poster a private message.

Thanks Brian,  It is interesting that there was lots of interest at that price point.  Posted in April so I assume it's gone.

https://www.wintertrekking.com/community/index.php?topic=5032.0

Cheers

Brian

11
Tents and Shelters / Re: How to convert tarp to tent
« on: November 22, 2019, 03:44:19 pm »
 "You can always put shock cord loops on the pull outs to take up any stretch."

The pitch was taught around the perimeter. I also tried to increase the height of the single pole and that didn't help either. Really didn't understand what was going on.

12
Tents and Shelters / Re: Need a larger Snowtrekker tent?
« on: November 22, 2019, 03:09:09 pm »
So you and BV disagree.  If I think of our minimalist sleeping footprint it is 4' x  6'  in the upper  right quarter of an 8 x 8 space, leaving  a 4 x 8 space on the left side of the tent for stove and gear.  Not sure if there would be space for a well in front of the stove like we have in our 8 x 11 Snowtrekker.   All this trouble for a weight reduction from 23 to 16 lbs.  and $900 to boot.

13
Tents and Shelters / Re: How to convert tarp to tent
« on: November 22, 2019, 08:33:58 am »
BV, a large pup tent in other words.  Would be dependent on having trees accessible.     My  teepee pitch managed to stay dry in wind driven rain last night BUT the fabric seemed to stretch overnight such that the pitch sagged badly.  When I looked at it i thought some stakes must have pulled out but no.  Common with this 4 oz fabric?

14
Tents and Shelters / Re: How to convert tarp to tent
« on: November 21, 2019, 03:19:00 pm »
Set it up today.  Would be tight for two people plus the stove.  Will check it in the rain tomorrow to see what happens.

15
Tents and Shelters / Re: Need a larger Snowtrekker tent?
« on: November 21, 2019, 03:16:39 pm »
Perhaps.   I am in communication with Snowtrekker to see if any of their smaller tents even works for two people.

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