View the most recent posts on the forum.


Author Topic: Dutch oven  (Read 8247 times)

Offline tg

  • Stoking the Woodstove
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
    • View Profile
Dutch oven
« on: November 08, 2010, 02:59:54 AM »
I just received a small hard anodized aluminum dutch oven (way lighter than cast iron) and I am wondering if anyone uses a dutch oven on their stove for baking.  Was thinking it might work pretty well to bake bread or cinnamon rolls.  Obviously could also be used on coals of an open fire.

thanks for your thoughts
Rich

Offline lifeintheround

  • Warming Up
  • **
  • Posts: 69
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2010, 11:40:07 AM »
I use a dutch oven on a wood stove quite a bit.  I find it works better if you keep rotating it from on top of the stove to underneath the stove.

Offline tg

  • Stoking the Woodstove
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2010, 02:20:56 PM »
thanks litr-makes sense but probably wouldn't have thought of that myself.  anyone else use a dutch oven with their stove?

Offline CampKat

  • Coming in From the Cold
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2010, 01:36:43 AM »
You can also use bbq coals underneath and in the lid of a dutch oven as your heat source or in conjunction with a fire or stove.  'The Scout's Outdoor Cookbook' has some great recipes if you can get your hands on a copy or check it out on Google Books.  You may have to adjust some of the quantities down from Scout troop size but I guess that depends on your appetite!

Offline canoecountry

  • Supporter
  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 356
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2011, 12:18:49 AM »
Just took my oldest daughter and my niece out camping and I wanted to see if I could only bring a dutch oven for cookware and get by. It worked great! I made a great one pot dinner of ground sausage and veggies on a bed of wild rice and as a bonus...cake in the dutch oven on top of the stove for a birthday that was spent in the tent. The kids thought that was super cool and a neat way to spend a birthday.

On an extended trip I would bring more cookware but the dutch over is very versatile and a joy to cook in becuase of the heat distribution.

CC

Offline lonegreeneagle

  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 323
  • Me at my personal BEST
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2011, 12:33:19 AM »
       As my daughter and I patiently waited, her new dutch oven gets broken in
http://picasaweb.google.com/lonegreeneagle/SeasoningAndUsingADutchOven#
We went to the Palisades today to XC ski and season/use her new dutch oven. Its a legless flat-top style, great for stove tops and with a stand in a firepit with wood embers or charcaol brickets.
       After removing the complimentary cookbook and spreading more oil inside the pot and on the lid, we started an ugly fire. Once it burned down to ash ( as we skied) we cooled the pot, wiped out the excess oil and put in the makings for a quick bison stew.
I always cut meat and veggies about tablespoon size and cheat with a brown gravy mix with water and seasonings.
       After placing about twelve coals below and on top (extra due to winter) we headed out the other direction in the park for about 45 minutes. (If the ingredients are frozen give it another +-20 minutes) Mixing an afternoon in the park with prepping new equipment is always more fun then in the back yard.
       The photos, unfortunately, don't do justice to how good a hot stew is when returning to camp or even a picnic site. Yes we winter campers can just go out for a picnic!


       I hope everyone gets into dutch oven cooking. it's so nice to start a meal and forget about it till its time to serve and eat!

       Thank You All
            Van

PS While I wear my wool gloves most of the time I pull over a pair of leather gloves to handle the pot or manage the wood/coals!
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 12:39:38 AM by lonegreeneagle »
Avid outdoorsman? My son and I snowshoe and winter camp with a four season tent and no stove. When my daughter comes along we drag sleds holding the campfire style tent I made and my military style Yukon stove. We canoe and kayak long trips in the early spring till Thanksgiving. That's my son's and my last float of the canoe season as we celebrate his birthday.  My daughter more than my son loves climbing. My sore neck!
Along with the tent, I've made packs,paddles and the poor man's RV from an 18' boat trailer. It now carries our canoes, kayaks, mountain bikes, camping ger and the TeePee pole

Offline Pawistik

  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
    • Bryan's Blog
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2011, 01:42:42 AM »
I guess I need some education on this whole dutch oven thing. Could someone please help to teach me the way of the dutch oven.

Cast iron or aluminum? Now I've seen cast iron dutch oven pots before, and I've heard of the aluminum sort as described by Rich. But does the aluminum do basically the same thing as the cast iron and does it do it well enough? I also see that GSI sells a couple of different types - the hard anodized aluminum and the (plain?) aluminum. What's the difference?

If I understand the principle, the metal soaks up the heat and rather than transferring it directly, radiates or transfers it more evenly across it's surface, the result being that hot spots and thus burning are reduced. Is that about right? So, stuck into the fire or on a stove and with coals on top, you can bake a cake, make up a bison stew, or make cinnamon rolls? What else can this beast do? Can I boil up a pot of water for tea or would I want to in one of these?

Seems pretty heavy. The lightest/smallest GSI dutch oven is 3 lb 10.6 oz for the 10" model, the 14" model is 8 lbs. I can't think that I could make much for a group in a 10" pot, and I don't think I'm ready to haul or carry an 8 pound pot. What am I missing about these things?

Cheers,
Bryan
http://pawistik.blogspot.com

There's no bad weather, just bad clothing.

Offline lonegreeneagle

  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 323
  • Me at my personal BEST
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2011, 11:32:46 PM »
            Hello Bryan,
       The greatest joy of any dutch oven is the one pot meal concept! Boiling water is not in its list of abilities! I carry an aluminum (hard anodized) while canoeing. In the time it takes to get charcoal brickets or embers red hot I can put together the ingredients for all of my favorite meals plus a cherry upside down cake (in a seperate oven) at a campsite. Then I can concentrate on erecting a tent or playing with my kids. Once dinner is done I use a plastic scraper to clean the pot and then apply a light coat of oil to re-season for the next meal.
       Cooking times and the amount of coals is the science of dutch oven cooking. For me a stew or soup in summer cooks with 4-5 coals beneath and on top in about 45 minutes. Winter time with a metal cover or wind shield 8-10 coals in both locations. On my yukon stove in the tent I can have a meal ready in an hour.
The hardest part of dutch oven cooking is NOT looking inside. When you follow a cook book don't open the lid till the recommended time. Releasing heat when looking slows cooking! Experience will have you eating a few overcooked meals, if so decrease cook time to your own style or taste.
       As for the difference between aluminum and cast iron; aluminum loses its heat after removing coals faster, and for me it lacks the old world cast iron taste benefits. I use cast iron pots and pans at home. Clean up is easier and foods are cooked more uniformally!


        Good Luck
             Van
Avid outdoorsman? My son and I snowshoe and winter camp with a four season tent and no stove. When my daughter comes along we drag sleds holding the campfire style tent I made and my military style Yukon stove. We canoe and kayak long trips in the early spring till Thanksgiving. That's my son's and my last float of the canoe season as we celebrate his birthday.  My daughter more than my son loves climbing. My sore neck!
Along with the tent, I've made packs,paddles and the poor man's RV from an 18' boat trailer. It now carries our canoes, kayaks, mountain bikes, camping ger and the TeePee pole

Offline lonelake

  • Supporter
  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 403
  • MINNESOTA, Winter Camping Symposium
    • View Profile
    • www.wintercampingsymposium.com
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2011, 07:05:26 PM »
Great post Van, thank you. Going to start a little Dutch oven cooking this year. Saving up for the GSI. Might be awhile!?

LL
Simplicity in all things is the secret of the wilderness and one of its most valuable lessons. It is what we leave behind that is important. I think the matter of simplicity goes further than just food, equipment, and unnecessary gadgets; it goes into the matter of thoughts and objectives as well. When in the wilds, we must not carry our problems with us or the joy is lost.
-Sigurd Olson

www.wintercampingsymposium.com
Proudly wearing Empire Wool and Canvas

Offline customknife

  • Stoking the Woodstove
  • ***
  • Posts: 210
  • Warm and dry
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2013, 08:34:11 AM »
Came across this video today and found this old thread on dutch ovens.  If you were camping with friends, this would be a fun addition:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ksyivTxZzw

Offline acurrier

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 611
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2013, 11:14:07 AM »
I have a KitchenAid enameled cast-iron dutch oven at home (got it from Canadian Tire) that I use to make bread occasionally. Works very well. I've also used it for soups/stews/roasts etc. I wouldn't want to bring it camping due to the weight, but it does cook well.

Offline AunNordDuNord

  • Supporter
  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 2095
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2013, 12:08:08 PM »
We use one in the summer, a cast iron one, and it does every thing we need!! From soup to stew to bread to cake.... in the winter, and probably in the summer in the future, we use a Frybake pan/oven... It is the best frying pan/dutch oven I ever use!!
The positive thing about our big dutch oven, is to cook group meal.

Offline scoutergriz

  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 307
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2013, 01:01:45 PM »
Last weekend, In Algonquin park we did Louisiana Chicken, and stir-fried veggies one night, and a full roast beef dinner with potatoes, veggies, dumplings and gravy in dutch ovens.
Mine is a hard anodized one and my buddy's is a plain aluminium one. Both worked as well as a cast iron one, but don't need seasoning- but the anodized one was way easier to clean!
I've also used mine on a 2- burner coleman as a deep-dish frypan, or to boil water.
Although it's a little heavy (about 9lbs with lid lifter, tongs, and bag) it replaces my frypan and large pot, and I can bake to boot, so to me it's a worthwhile tradeoff.
Here's a site with lots of tips and recipies-
http://camping.about.com/od/campingrecipes/u/camping-recipes.htm

Offline customknife

  • Stoking the Woodstove
  • ***
  • Posts: 210
  • Warm and dry
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2013, 02:38:19 PM »
Thanks for the site.  Just book marked it!

Offline TuscaroraBorealis

  • Warming Up
  • **
  • Posts: 59
    • View Profile
Re: Dutch oven
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2017, 06:56:53 PM »
What are some of the things to look for when purchasing a dutch oven?  User friendly brands - pros/cons of aluminum vs. cast etc.  Ideal size for a group of 4? Favorite meals/recipes.