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Author Topic: Ice chisels  (Read 3306 times)

Offline bigbore442001

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Ice chisels
« on: February 05, 2011, 07:38:41 pm »
How many people here still use the old fashioned ice chisel to cut into the ice? It seems everyone around my area is using gas powered augers. I know they are quick but in a way you are limited if you intend to do anything on remote waters.

Offline Ted

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Re: Ice chisels
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2011, 07:44:58 pm »
I do,
it's made by Craig McDonald and it's a beaut!

Ted
http://www.parkerclan.ca
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Offline canoecountry

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Re: Ice chisels
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2011, 10:13:20 pm »
We can't use anything powered in the BWCA so it is either a hand auger or an ice chisel. I have made a few out of zamboni blades that work well but usually bring a lazer hand auger.

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Offline canoecountry

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Re: Ice chisels
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2011, 10:15:26 pm »
Hey Ted, do you have any pics of the Craig Macdonald chisel? If you do please post. I have also heard good things about the pole and paddle chisels too.

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Offline crooked knife

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Re: Ice chisels
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2011, 02:05:34 am »
I have pretty much every option for hole punching.  Ice chisels are great for many applications, and if you're not fishing and searching around for fish, then they are great.  I use mine mostly for checking ice thickness, trapping holes (since there is usually lots of sticks and mud in the ice for beaver trapping), and reopening or widening fishing and watering holes.  When out winter camping having an ice chisel is VERY important, especially for ice thickness.  But when it comes to cutting holes in the ice for fishing it's not the best.  Using a hand auger is a great compromise for remote applications.  They aren't very heavy and you'll go through to water quick.  Power augers are great if you never leave a snowmobile or vehicle.  But are more of a luxury.

Don't be down on hand augers though if you're going to be moving around and fishing.  If you've ever been on a lake with 3-4 feet of ice and want to put a few holes in to wet a line for a few people, you'll be at it for a while.  Plus, with ice chisels you end up with irregular sides on your hole, which will snag your fishing line if you're not careful. 
It's cool to "old school" rocken out with just the ice chisel, certainly they are bullet proof.  But a properly tuned up sharp hand auger will chew through ice quick with minimal effort and still leave you with energy enough to move on and drill another hole to find fish if that one doesn't work out.  Certainly, though,  if you were just going to have one I'd say an ice chisel of course

Not sure if you wer going to be fishing but thats my 2 cents worth. 

Joe E

Offline lonegreeneagle

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Re: Ice chisels
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2011, 06:58:52 am »
Here's a pennies worth along with a welcome to the show!
       I am generally(not to be confused with a dodge charger) not out on the ice(lake or river) and I get my water from melting snow. If I were a fishermen I would use an auger. An ice chisel is a heavy, long burden and serves a good purpose for those out on lakes and rivers, needing access to water.
       I have used one in the past when cutting block ice after sawing, they are an incredible useful and tough tool, when needed. I cannot speak for anyone else here, I am not camping this way to be a "rendevous" follower. Though I do attend those events and stick within a code of primitive/ period correct only tools.
       I do not advocate the old harder ways here, I merely get outdoors and back to nature without alot of extra trappings. By harvesting wood fire fuel, I choose not to carry propane heaters. By melting snow and purifying that water, I don't carry big water jugs down range. And when combating frost and spark holes, I choose a canvas tent! Or my canvas Whelen tarp and an open fire with a quality sleep system under a canvas bedroll.
        You made a point of mentioning; remote waters, If you don't want to carry, pack or drag the weight, DON'T! I usually carry less when out by myself then with family or a group. Left to my own devices, I'll be a minimalist without being an ultralighter.
         Good luck with your decision and once again
              Welcome to wintertrekking bigbore
                                   Van
Avid outdoorsman? My son and I snowshoe and winter camp with a four season tent and no stove. When my daughter comes along we drag sleds holding the campfire style tent I made and my military style Yukon stove. We canoe and kayak long trips in the early spring till Thanksgiving. That's my son's and my last float of the canoe season as we celebrate his birthday.  My daughter more than my son loves climbing. My sore neck!
Along with the tent, I've made packs,paddles and the poor man's RV from an 18' boat trailer. It now carries our canoes, kayaks, mountain bikes, camping ger and the TeePee pole