View the most recent posts on the forum.


Author Topic: Anyone in Ontario make their own HDPE toboggan? Where to find material.  (Read 16294 times)

Offline Harlan

  • Administrator
  • Stoking the Woodstove
  • *****
  • Posts: 232
    • View Profile
    • SoloTripping.com - The Solo Tripper's Online Community
Re: Anyone in Ontario make their own HDPE toboggan? Where to find material.
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2011, 02:01:44 pm »
Hey BB,

I have them available at $125 for a 10' x 16" blank with smoothed edges...ready to go!


Offline Ted

  • Supporter
  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
    • View Profile
hockey sticks and tie-downs
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2011, 05:04:01 pm »
Got my uhmwpe at a local plastics store here in Ottawa.
For cross pieces, I just went down to the local hockey rink and picked up broken hockey sticks. :)

Lots of fun building your own. The only real interesting part is the tie-downs. Some people like rope, some like webbing and some like bungee cord.
I've tried all three and all have the idiosyncrasies  with rope being my least favorite. I've been using webbing in the past.
But this year moving to a combination of webbing and bungee just for a little experimenting and fun.

Cheers Ted
http://www.parkerclan.ca
To the Silent Places

Offline buddhabelly

  • Supporter
  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 266
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone in Ontario make their own HDPE toboggan? Where to find material.
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2011, 05:57:27 pm »
Webbing is a great idea, I have some 1/2 inch that's got a reflective strip in it as well. What size rope were you using Ted ? Thought rope and some prussiks would be a great way to fine tune the lash down so it was adjustable.

Offline Ted

  • Supporter
  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone in Ontario make their own HDPE toboggan? Where to find material.
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2011, 11:12:33 am »
I've used 5mm but only because I bought an entire 100m roll at a close out sale. Bigger would be better.

A  couple of comments based solely on my personal experiences. Anyone jumping in with "this works well" would be appreciated. 

I find rope knots can be a bit of a pain to tie and untie sometimes. prussiks along the fixed side ropes are great.  A metal ring on the prussik is handy.
When using rope, a good slip knot and long tail that doesn't require any finger dexterity works well. Un-tying a frozen knot can be a real challenge as are those a small plastic snap buckles.
Most systems work well in cold weather but a little freezing rain/wet snow can pretty well jamb anything. I got so frustrated one time that I had my belt knife out before I calmed down a little
I'd love to find an outlet for those long tailed webbing buckles that BlackRiver uses on their sleds. They look perfect for freezing rain or wet snow conditions.
My version of an ideal system would be everything wrapped in a body bag, 1/2" webbing using BlackRiver style buckles, and bungees for securing top load stuff like my 7' long chisel, skis/snowshoes.
If no BlackRiver style buckles then rope and bungee.

To get around frozen knots, I've used smooth sticks to hold rope loops together.  One loop does get tied off with a truckers hitch but with a stick holding the two loops. A quick pull on the stick and the whole thing falls apart.  I can then undo the hitch at my leisure. Rope and stick is the fastest system that I've ever used and came in handy when setting up camp at the end of a long day nearing sunset.

Neither rope nor webbing will flex when the toboggan does.
In short dips or hills, the toboggan does a lot of flexing so the load can sometimes loosen and shift a bit.
Wrapping the entire load "body bag" style, like Lookingnorth shows in one of his photos, really limits shifting and snow collection.
Bungees do a great job of flexing, always keeping the load tight.
On the other hand, bungees can be quite dangerous if accidentally let loose then stretched. That's something that can happen when hands are cold.
My ophthalmologist neighbour thinks that bungees should be outlawed as he often sees the results of bungee hooks destroying eyes.

If we ever get some snow around here, I'm going to try both rope and bungees.  Rope for holding the stove at the far back and my sleeping system/clothes container at the front.
Then bungees in the middle to hold everything else. Bungees will also give me fast access to my ice chisel which I use as a sounding probe on ice, shovel, skis or snowshoes.

(As usual, a typical Ted long-winded answer to a simple question. :-[ )
Ted

http://www.parkerclan.ca
To the Silent Places

Offline Ted

  • Supporter
  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
    • View Profile
apologies
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2011, 11:14:39 am »
My apologies to Scott. It's his photo that shows the bivy container.
http://www.parkerclan.ca
To the Silent Places

Offline Grizzly Adam

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 625
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone in Ontario make their own HDPE toboggan? Where to find material.
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2011, 11:47:38 am »
Grizz here last year I used a bungee system on my toboggan I used a spool of 1/4" bungee to go around the perimeter of the sled anchored on the cross braces and tied as to make a rectangular loop and in between these braces i placed a small karibiner on one side so when you wrap all your gear in a tarp or whatever you choose you simply grab corresponding bungee points and stretch over the load and clip this way there is a infinite way to adjust the load and is quite safe "no snapping hooks in the face" and it forms a nice X pattern across the load to lash irregular items  or things close at hand " lunch, day pack rifle ax saw ext" sorry don't have any pics but if you have any questions PM me and I will give personal contact info Cheers Grizz.

Offline acurrier

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 611
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone in Ontario make their own HDPE toboggan? Where to find material.
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2011, 01:21:21 pm »
I'm planning on making a canvas bag/cover for my toboggan, and I was thinking about going with a setup using webbing and double rings (like a double ring belt) to secure the flap. Pretty sure it will be easier to open in the cold than a frozen knot...my only concern is having fingers freeze to the metal.

I'll be putting an order in with www.strapworks.com for my webbing and rings. Their prices are very reasonable, and the shipping was pretty quick. Good selection, but the 3/4" plastic buckles I ordered last time were a little flimsy. I'd want to order something a little more solid next time.

If you place an order with this company there is an option to order a free bag of scrap webbing. Most of the pieces I got were about 1' long, but there were a couple of webbing rolls in there that were 5-10' long. Only cost is added weight for shipping.

Offline Grizzly Adam

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 625
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone in Ontario make their own HDPE toboggan? Where to find material.
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2011, 05:01:31 pm »
Hey man don't worry to much about freezing to the buckle this usually only happens if skin is damp or wet I ice climbed for years with all kinds of metal even using my mouth to hold stuff and no problems LOL not like tongue to lamp post as kids did dumb [email protected]#$ back then  LOL Should work fine and easy to DE-ice if needed Cheers Grizz

Offline Ted

  • Supporter
  • Hauling Sled
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
    • View Profile
sticking to metal
« Reply #23 on: December 13, 2011, 11:37:08 am »
I always wear a pair of unlined leather gloves (deerskin I think) to load and unload the toboggan.
No sticking issues with anything including handling the steel stove.

Occasionally, I slip on a pair of thin wool under gloves first if it's really cold.
These gloves and replaceable liners are my favourites to wear when on the move - pulling or exploring.

fwiw,
ted

http://www.parkerclan.ca
To the Silent Places