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Author Topic: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode  (Read 10522 times)

Offline brianw

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Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« on: January 24, 2012, 06:15:00 PM »
Greetings

I came across an unlsted youtube video of Les Stroud doing another 7 day winter survival show.  It is different than any of the previously shown Survivorman episodes.

Sit back, grab some popcorn and hot chocolate and enjoy the next 46 minutes.

http://youtu.be/0GQ6pE3An-Y

Cheers

Brian

Offline mikemxyzzy

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2012, 09:58:12 PM »
There is a summer episode as well:

Stranded - Summer

wooley

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2012, 09:45:20 AM »
Thanx Brian
q...here I am on nice,hot beach in the DR and I can STILL get my winter fix!  ;D

Offline chimpac

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2012, 11:56:00 PM »
Very interesting. He had quite a bit of equipment , a sled, snowshoes, axe, all most warm clothes.

 He suffered greatly from the cold, no sleep and not enough food. I guess he wanted to show the chances of finding food. He could have got some sleep if he had warmer clothes and not depended on the fire at night.

It shows how important it is for any one going out to have the right clothes to stay warm when out all day.
His coat and hood was no where warm enough.
 I do not ever cover my nose and mouth like he did, I depend on a hood that is warm enough when drawn to a small opening in the very cold. I do not wear a hat with a hood.
I would trade his long mitts in for coat sleeves long enough to cover my hands so I can wear gloves or mitts to work with and be able to draw them up in the sleeves to get warm.
I would trade his axe for a hoe handle with a harrow tooth screwed in the end, to cut a hole in the ice or defend myself if some hungry wolves came around. The hoe handle might get me out of the water if I went thru the ice.
A tarp with a stove /chimney (6lbs) would make it a picnic if I could find something to eat.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2012, 12:24:01 AM by chimpac »

Offline brianw

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2012, 05:57:49 PM »
Thanx Brian
q...here I am on nice,hot beach in the DR and I can STILL get my winter fix!  ;D

So you are doing the old, hot weather trip to get you ready for the winter trip in a few weeks?  Have to keep the wife and kids happy. ;)

Cheers

Brian

Offline sethwotten

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2012, 11:14:51 AM »
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure that these were the pilots for the Survivorman series.

Offline Tomd

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2012, 07:03:19 PM »
I watched most of this, but I must say, I don't get the point. I would rather watch a show about what to take and how to use it than one about going out without what you need and trying to survive. Yes, I understand people go places without proper gear, but still, this lack of proper gear was obviously "planned" yet he had some stuff with him. For me, learning what to take for emergencies is as, if not more important than learning how to do without.

Example-just recently four people-2 hikers and 2 climbers, disappeared on Mt. Rainier. A search turned up nothing, not a trace. Bad weather got them-big storms came in just as both parties were to be coming off the mountain. Each was said to have proper gear-food, clothing, shelter, food and fuel, but apparently they ran out of food and fuel. Hard to say.  However, apparently neither party had a sat phone, cel phone, SPOT or PLB, so no one knew where they were or where to look. Any of these 4 devices might have saved them, especially, IMHO, a PLB or sat phone. 

I have no idea what happened to these folks. Around the same time, a snowshoer who got lost from his group and a couple snowshoeing were found-they were lucky, the couple was somewhat prepared, but still, they had no stove and no bags with them. They lucked out by coming across the SAR team looking for the other 4.

Offline kanukster

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2012, 07:33:28 PM »
Stroud has always been a legend in his own mind!
Judgement day is just another day on the calendar...I hope!

Offline Tomd

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2012, 08:24:28 PM »
My apologies if I posted these before--

Here are two of my favorite sayings-
"Adventure is just bad planning." — Roald Amundsen (1872—1928).

"Having an adventure shows that someone is incompetent, that something has gone wrong. An adventure is interesting enough — in retrospect. Especially to the person who didn't have it." — Vilhjalmur Stefansson, My Life with the Esquimo.

I always find these amusing. When I lived in Hawaii, sailors would get lost on their way over from the Mainland and often wound up being rescued by the Coast Guard with some epic tale of survival brought on by a lack of planning or proper gear. Most of the time, all I could think was "Hey dumb...! Why weren't you prepared for a trip like that?" when we learned what happened-no radio, no navigation skills, that sort of thing.


Offline brianw

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2012, 10:21:27 PM »
I watched most of this, but I must say, I don't get the point. I would rather watch a show about what to take and how to use it than one about going out without what you need and trying to survive. Yes, I understand people go places without proper gear, but still, this lack of proper gear was obviously "planned" yet he had some stuff with him. For me, learning what to take for emergencies is as, if not more important than learning how to do without.


The point is, that stuff happens.  You could be completely prepare for a winter trip, but what happens if for some reason, that you toboggan falls through the ice and you lose your gear except for what you have on your person?  Now what?  The Surviorman show wouldn't be much of a show about survival if he had every piece of gear he needed.  Les has said it himself in one of his shows.  If he had more gear to use, it would be camping and not survival.

Cheers

Brian

Offline mbiraman

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2012, 12:44:40 AM »
I have to admit that a couple of things bothered me when i first saw it but i also have to remember that its made for TV and the masses who don't know anything. Hopefully it gets people thinking and over time they put a real kit together and act more responsibly. If it was up to me you would need training to be in  the woods,,,,not just a vehicle to get you there.

Two things would have made his stay  allot better and that would be a 5x8 heetsheet and a small saw like a Bahco Laplander.

All the survival shows are just more TV. I don't include Ray Mears in this group .
"Mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it."

Offline Forestwalker

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2012, 02:10:11 AM »
I like the movies. Not because they show how to do it and how to equip for the woods. But they give people an idea about what surviving could involve. Basically there are three cases I see in wilderness life

1. What I teach in survival courses. This is for people who are not experts, but who takes a course thinking "ok, what if I ford a river on my hike and loose the pack?" or "say I go off for a day-trip from my tent, and loose my way getting back?". For those people an improvised shelter, a few hints on firemaking, practice doing it "for real" (e.g. actually sleeping in the shelter they build), stressing keeping warm and drinking water, etc is what they need to turn those scenarios from a life-threatening disaster into nothing more than a nice tale to tell over coffee in the breakroom at work the next week.

2. Normal bush travel. Then I have kit I like, stuff I know I can depend on, and it is not an adventure, it is just something you do. I tend to recall Ruthstrums tale in his winter book, about the father and daugher pair that he took out of the bush when young, or the tales of Helge Ingstad (et al). Competent wilderness travel, no nonsense. That is my goal.
 
3. What I would do if I made a mistake (pulk though ice, etc). Then it would be similar to number one, but different in all to many details, simply beacuse I have more skills and experience in the bushcraft and survival bits than the normal person who takes a one week course and goes hiking a few times a year.

Last winter someone died here in Sweden. He had ridden is snowmobile to a small cabin. In the middle of the night it caught fire. He tried, wearing only his jockey shorts, to ride the snowmobile home. No go. A bag of spare clothes by the snowmobile would have turned it into an adventure to tell tales about.

Offline kgd

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2012, 07:55:48 PM »
Les trained with Allen Beachamp which means he's had some real schooling in winter survival.  A lot of his TV work tends to make him look less skilled than he actually is and part of this is because he wants the viewer to see that survival isn't about comfort and convenience, quite the opposite.  For example, the pilot episode where it took him 12 h to get a friction fire.  That boy could get a friction fire built in his sleep, but he was creating a pilot and trying to sell it. He's also an artist and he knows how to market his wears.  I admire him, he is a success doing the things he loves and while he plays some games with his shows, he keeps the information pretty legitimate. What he does is hard on his body and has had its toll on his personal life. 

Chimpac, I also wouldn't mind having a hoe in the bush....Problem is, you'd have to wake up to her in the morning  ;)

Offline bushman

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #13 on: February 29, 2012, 07:44:53 PM »
I agree with TOMd. It would be very useful to have a tv show that dealt with great gear. How and what to put in one's Winter or Summer outfit and how to interchange gear for the seasons. This would not take away from shows like Survivor man but rather, complement them. Such a tv show would be a great educational tool to help people understand the importance of being properly outfitted and educated before taking on the elements. Because that is in fact, what one does when entering the wilderness.

All the shows excepting Ray Mears, deal with how to survive without when, there is an equal need, for a show which demonstrates proper planning, outfit selection, navigation, wilderness first aid, communications, etc, issues. The log cabin example is a very instructive and a solution that many would not think of. These world wide examples would be an important element in wilderness gear show. We need a Gear guy type, who can bring winter trekking to the masses, on their asses, in front of their big screens. Who knows, it may even save some lives.

There are lots of ideas on youtube but, thats only for those motivated to look for such things.

I think that there would a great deal of interest in what one should have and many would follow through and purchase much of the gear required, for the area and season(s) they encounter.
No one show will encompass all the possibilities that the wilderness can throw at you but, having the absolute necessities always on your person, will give one the greatest chance of survival after an unplanned canoe or, tobaggan event with your gear. That and some knowledge will keep one going, even without any experience.

"The more you carry in your head, the less you need to carry on your back."

Offline Tomd

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Re: Les Stroud Winter Survival Episode
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2012, 03:32:59 AM »
My point, which perhaps I didn't make as clearly as I could have was this-yes, as Brian says, you might lose your gear through the ice, then what? OK, let's see that, but what I have read mostly in reading SAR reports or news stories is that the people who didn't survive often didn't lose their gear, they didn't have it in the first place.

Example-this one with a good ending: a few years ago in Washington, a MeetUp group (MeetUp is a website where people with common interests can find each other for activities like camping) went winter camping. The leader did not check the weather report, didn't insist that the campers have proper gear (no one brought snowshoes or skis) and they were caught in a huge storm. One or two of them managed to get out and get help and a massive rescue was launched (ground SAR, helos, snowmachines, ambulances). They were found and brought out. Had the weather stayed bad, it could have killed all of them. If they had brought snowshoes or skis, they all could have walked out on their own. Why didn't they have them? They didn't know any better. I think the leader told someone who did have a pair to just leave them in his car. How ignorant is that? I'm a city boy and even I know that was really, really stupid.