View the most recent posts on the forum.


Author Topic: Cleaning pike boneless  (Read 10048 times)

Offline Hutchy

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 577
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2012, 10:27:37 AM »
Wow, thanks for that. Am definitely trying that this year. Seems pretty straight forward.

Hutch
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline Aarona

  • Warming Up
  • **
  • Posts: 84
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2012, 10:58:27 AM »
I love N pike fried, steamed/ boiled and dipped in butter, or pickled. If you are getting smaller fish (under 24") I think the best cleaning method is to take the top piece, then the tail sections, then down the sides of the Y-bones and ribs method. If they are bigger you can do the regular fillet method and remove the Y bones after. I guess it shows that I get lots of little ones because I don't know how to do that second method very well but am great at doing the first method and it's easy to learn.

My pickling variation is that I do a soak in a vinegar/salty brine until the chunks of fish are white/ cooked looking (agreed that too long a soak makes them tougher). Then rinse them off good. I then put my pickling spice and vinegar and sugar in a pan and heat it until it gets warm but not boiling and the sugar dissolves. I then let it cool and set my fish and onion layers into your vessel of choice for the fish and then pour the strained liquid (gets out the pickling spice stuff) over the fish and onion to top of the vessels. Let er sit a few more days and enjoy. I've done this with smelt, N pike, tulibees, red horse, and suckers. I would advise taking out the rib bones since it's so easy with all fish; the pin bones and other bones will get dissolved. 

Offline Hutchy

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 577
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2013, 12:56:42 AM »
Pickled smelt. Now that seems like a great idea! One can only eat so many cajun fried smelt before thinking there must be something else to do with them. Many in freezer still... I bet it makes the backbones dissolve well, no?

Hutch
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline Aarona

  • Warming Up
  • **
  • Posts: 84
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2013, 08:58:55 AM »
No, you've got to fillet the smelt out carefully- just kidding! Yes, the bones get soft enough to not notice. Same prep style on the smelt (chop head and clean cavity). I cut them in half so they are a one bite per chunk, but they can be left whole too. Try it you'll like it, healthy way to gobble more smelt. We've done bluegills too if they are coming easy through the ice.

Offline Hutchy

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 577
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2013, 10:30:56 AM »
Can someone reccommend a tiny fillet knife for the smelt? Something with about say, a two inch blade?  ;D

Hutch

Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline Foxfire

  • Coming in From the Cold
  • *
  • Posts: 44
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2013, 12:06:29 AM »
http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=KM3wAgBmeNU&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DKM3wAgBmeNU

There a bunch on YouTube on the OP. my bro has done it and it truly work's. He really likes northern's now.

Offline HOOP

  • Administrator
  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 2030
    • View Profile
    • My YouTube Channel
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2013, 12:39:14 AM »
Excellent!   That's the pattern I do it, but that expert was WAYYYYY more efficient and precise than I am.  He did that in about 1/4 the time I do.  Time for me to practice! 

I think it is true that pike tastes better than walleye.   I know, I know, sacrilege.   :o    But feed on some nice ice fishing pike and its hard to deny - they are really good.  I don't bread them.  Just sprinkle with Tex-Mex spice and fry in olive oil - good eating!
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker

"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline kgd

  • Warming Up
  • **
  • Posts: 92
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2013, 11:55:46 AM »
I prefer pike.  My wife and I went to a fly-in fishing outpost one year where we had access to 3 different lakes for fishing.  One was full of walleye - which is what attracted us to that particular out-post site.  The other two lakes were really productive for pike and made for really enjoyable and easy access fishing.  I remember lugging a small outboard over to the walleye lake the first night and we caught 3 walleye the next morning.  During the afternoon that first day, we hung around the much more productive pike lake and decided to take a fish to compare the two of them side by side.  I have enjoyed pike most of my life but my wife was conditioned to think of it as a poor fish. I remember we both preferred the pike to walleye by a long shot.  We loved the greater firmness of the flesh.  We used the five fillet method.  I didn't quite get all the bones out of the side fillets, but I was careful to feed my wife the parts of the top piece and tail pieces so she wouldn't get any bones at all.    Anyhow, bones don't really bother me and sometimes I think its good if I have something to slow me down while eating fish :)  After our taste test, I went back to the walleye lake only to retrieve the motor.  We spent the rest of our week at the output fishing and enjoying the pike!

As to the OP - by all means make a video on your fillet technique.  Making videos are a lot of fun and creative exercises.  Plus, there is never any one definitive video out there showing everything that needs to be shown.  Watching more videos gives us viewers different perspectives and ideas.  For a video on filleting fish, this is one case where having somebody film you is a definite plus. 

Having watched (and favorited) the link provided by Foxfire, I'd say there is room for improvement on the instructional.  A couple of critiques on that video are provided so that if somebody were to make another video on the topic they might consider them.  The linked video was better at showing the proficiency of the person than it was at instructing the process.  It was a bit too fast in its execution.  The person filming also had a tendency to zoom in and out during the process trying to catch the action.  It would have been more effect (from an instructional point of view) if the person filming would ask the person doing the filleting to stop at different points to allow the person filming to re-set up the camera and then continue on.  I think on an instructional such as this it is worth while to combine still shots with video.  For example, strategically capturing the initial placement of the fillet knife prior to the cut can be captured with a still shot more effectively and held on the video for about 5 or 6 seconds with some voice-over work to talk about what land marks on the fish are used to position the knife. 

Looking forward to the video that you make! 

Offline Hutchy

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 577
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2013, 04:20:41 PM »
Cool. I am in school in sudbury now. But I have three day weekends. This weekend I will try to catch some pike. Never posted a video, but the challenge seems cool. I will be using the gfs I phone, so we will see how it goes. The pic quality is great, I cant see how a vid would be any different

Hutch
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline low-1

  • Stoking the Woodstove
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2013, 10:12:14 AM »
Smoked jackfish is also VERY tasty.  I'm not sure which method you use to de-bone them, the 3-piece method or whatever is probably the most efficient.  We have so many up here, I'm really not concerned about wasting the very little that I do using a "zipper" method.  Basically, fillet and rib out just like walleye, then run the knife tip about 1/3 to 1/2 through the thickness of the fillet right down the center line.  Then following that cut, angle the knife towards the top of the fillet and you'll feel the blade "tick" off the y bones.  Notch it at the front, and give that notched piece a pull from head to tail, all the y bones pull out like a zipper.  Done right, it's very fast and wastes very little.  I use it for all sizes of eater pike, but probably works best on the larger end.  Leave the skin on, debone as described, brine and smoke with alder, VERY VERY tasty.

Even baked or fried, jackfish are delicious, especially if they come out of cold water.  Way up north here, that's all year round.  Down south, towards the end of the summer, the flesh turns a deeper yellow and that's when the more "fishy" flavour really starts to set in.

Offline Hutchy

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 577
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2013, 06:44:52 PM »
Well the vid may take a while. My "camera" left me. Guess I should buy one of my own now.

Hutch

Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline HOOP

  • Administrator
  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 2030
    • View Profile
    • My YouTube Channel
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2013, 06:51:44 PM »
Smoked jackfish is also VERY tasty.  I'm not sure which method you use to de-bone them, the 3-piece method or whatever is probably the most efficient.  We have so many up here, I'm really not concerned about wasting the very little that I do using a "zipper" method.  Basically, fillet and rib out just like walleye, then run the knife tip about 1/3 to 1/2 through the thickness of the fillet right down the center line.  Then following that cut, angle the knife towards the top of the fillet and you'll feel the blade "tick" off the y bones.  Notch it at the front, and give that notched piece a pull from head to tail, all the y bones pull out like a zipper.  Done right, it's very fast and wastes very little.  I use it for all sizes of eater pike, but probably works best on the larger end.  Leave the skin on, debone as described, brine and smoke with alder, VERY VERY tasty.

Even baked or fried, jackfish are delicious, especially if they come out of cold water.  Way up north here, that's all year round.  Down south, towards the end of the summer, the flesh turns a deeper yellow and that's when the more "fishy" flavour really starts to set in.

Hi Low-1,
I am having trouble picturing this "zipper method".  Can you make a video or point us to one?
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker

"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline Hutchy

  • Living Large At -40
  • *****
  • Posts: 577
    • View Profile
Re: Cleaning pike boneless
« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2013, 11:09:05 PM »
Low-1,

I do a very similar method to the one you are doing. If the two methods are similar, one just ends up cutting the y bones almost all the way out, and then pulling them out in a strip.The ends of the bones pull out of the meat, very much like a zipper, and leaves more meat IMO. I do a few more steps... but I think its very similar.

Hutchy
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...