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Author Topic: lampwick  (Read 13107 times)

Offline Rob

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2009, 05:48:54 pm »
Bought some lampwick today at the local Home Hardware for 49 cents per foot.

Using the diagram in the Conover's book to tie them it was easy. Now I got to get them out in the field and test them. Anybody thinking about doing this you can count on using approx 6 feet for each foot. $6 per pair.
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Offline Harlan

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2009, 08:17:43 pm »
Hey, bring me a sample tomorrow. 

Offline Rob

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2009, 09:22:05 pm »
Will do.
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Offline Harlan

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2009, 08:19:48 am »
So here's Rob's lampwick binding all set up on a pair of Steger Mukluks. 




Offline White Wolf

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2009, 09:39:08 am »
Looks good guys.

Just wondering if Rob left enough material for the lamp wick to go around a different set of boots.

Jeff
Kenora Ontario

Offline jaunty

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2009, 09:51:41 am »


Is that how the Conovers recommend tying into the babiche?  (I don't have their later editions.)  It gives a pretty wide toe loop, and one that may slip sideways.  My feet would be sliding forward on downhill grades, but maybe that's just me. 






Offline Rob

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2009, 05:13:28 pm »
There is lots of wick for tying into bigger boots. The adjustment is not done by tying the knot but from unravelling the loop from the toe piece. Those are a size 13 pictured there.

I have not actually worn them yet, so I will let you know how they handle but I can't see them slipping too much. The toe piece is rather snug.

I did exactly as the Conovers described in their book. I will let you know as I plan a day trip this weekend to a friends cabin for a beer. Turns out it is not far from where i want to go camping in a few weeks when the weather gets better. (Tooooo warm right now)


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Offline jaunty

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2009, 06:59:45 pm »


I can see that the adjustability (by means of winding or unwinding the heel loop) is a big advantage.  But what I was wondering about was the spacing of the two points where the lampwick attaches to the snowshoe.  Anyway, it will be interesting to hear how they work.  Thanks for the pics. 


Speaking of adjustability, I've sometimes used nylon webbing in place of lampwick, with a Fastex buckle for adjustability.  I may try using one with lampwick, instead of a knot. 


Here in southern Ontario it's going to be ridiculously mild (+6, +7) over the next several days. 


Offline Rob

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2009, 05:51:26 pm »
Today I had finally had a chance to test out the new binding in some real conditions.

Snow was untouched and therefore DEEP. I broke trail while the kids and the dogs and the significant other followed in my hard work.

This is what I found....

They need to be tight. If you think it is going to be tight enough, make it tighter. Even though the temperature was -10C the lampwick still got wet and stretched as it did so. When they are sloppy they are ineffective.

Adjusting them was very simple and effective.

Once you have practiced the slip in and out routine a couple of times it is very easy.

Overall I think I am going to prefer them over the leather bindings in the long run.

I will need to get some more lampwick though because on Thursday I scored 2 pairs of Faber Huron snowshoes and 1 pair of Avery and Sons Ojibwe snowshoes. Price was right. $0


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Offline jaunty

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2009, 07:07:16 pm »

You should find that they only stretch the first time you use them. 


Offline jaunty

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Re: lampwick
« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2009, 07:16:37 pm »
Here are some illustrations of the "Indian hitch," described above. 


Step 1:  Tie two half-hitches around the master chord, as shown: 



2:  Slide your toes under all the lampwick: 



3:  Tighten the lampwick, and lock it with an overhand knot: 



4:  Pass the lampwick around the back of the ankle and tie it off: 


The finished hitch will probably end up looking neater than it does in the pic; to make it easier to shoot, I tied it onto an empty moccasin. 

Carry spare pieces of lampwick with you in case, as happened to Haggis' Good Son, yours "bursts asunder."   :)  You can always use a spare piece as a sash, if you want to. 




« Last Edit: March 09, 2009, 07:34:58 pm by jaunty »