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Author Topic: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive  (Read 37977 times)

Offline ffdjm

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2013, 04:24:02 pm »
Thanks for the picture of the dog team. The design is unusual. Shows the influence of harnesses for large animals like horses. Hitching dogs in single file is necessary in the forest away from ready made snowmachine trails but those inverted U-shaped wooden pieces to transmit pull are never used here in north america. One reason for their use may be a shortage of leather.

Douglas

Offline Kaifus

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2013, 11:25:35 pm »
Really interesting about the footwraps or "Russian socks" and I'm shocked they were still in use by armies until just recently. They look very uncomfortable, but I'd like to try some soon.

Offline Mangrove

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2013, 03:16:19 am »
Was that saw in the belt standard issue for all soldiers?  If so, that's brilliant!  Self sufficiency at all times, even when supply lines are cut.

I have not seen such device being used by any other troops than the Finnish long-range patrol troops, who operated far behind enemy lines (as far as Arkhangelsk at the shores of the White Sea).

Hitching dogs in single file is necessary in the forest away from ready made snowmachine trails but those inverted U-shaped wooden pieces to transmit pull are never used here in north america. One reason for their use may be a shortage of leather.

I do not know the specifics of the design, but it was used by the Finnish Army from the 1920s onwards as the best design available for Finnish conditions.

Making of a "rakovalkea" fire (some photographs from the series have been omitted here). No. 148428-148437.
1) Listening the sound the wood makes when hit with an axe. A good tree for the fire is dead and dry, but not hollow.



2) Carving grooves along the log in order to make room for the air to circulate.



3) A second log has been put on top of the other.



4) Add some wood chips and the fire is ready! A fire of this size will probably burn for some 12 hours.

« Last Edit: November 10, 2013, 03:26:42 am by Mangrove »

Offline Mangrove

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2013, 02:45:18 am »
Rather nice examples of numerous trench art pieces made during the darkness of the winter months.

Fan bird by Pvt. Sorsa ("Duck"). No. 126562.



Birch bark handbag, miniature backpack and a pair of shoes. No. 90184.



Wooden locks. No. 151242.



Traditional vessel for carrying liquids. No. 139189.


Offline Pyreneo

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2013, 07:08:20 am »
2) Carving grooves along the log in order to make room for the air to circulate.


Thanks again!

I like this view of a "long fire".

A small detail seems to be essential and not common. I think (?), that we could see that a long small piece of wood (right hand of the soldier) is along the bottom trunk...to prevent the system to turn  and collapse during burning. So you need only few nails and you could have a lot of "leg of wood" (in the left hand of the soldier) to hold the system during the night

In the picture the soldier seems to be an officer or something like that (the pistol is on the left, like a sword) : So making such a fire is certainly something important
« Last Edit: November 12, 2013, 07:18:32 am by Pyreneo »
Could read english but difficult to write it.

Offline memaquay

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2013, 11:09:51 am »
Wow, lots of good stuff there!  Hoop, I own a Mosin Nagant, they are very cheap to buy. Mine was 160 bucks.  Sometimes called the Russian 30-06.  Good beating around gun for winter camping, a bit heavy for canoe tripping, but no worries about banging it around.

Offline Mangrove

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2013, 06:18:34 am »
To all fishermen out there, here are some photographs for you!

1) A Northern pike weighing "some 11 kg". No. 150319.



2) Some European perches. No. 147434.



3) Smoking fish. No. 147437 .



Offline customknife

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #22 on: November 14, 2013, 10:53:56 pm »
These black and white images are magic.

Offline Mangrove

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2013, 03:55:47 pm »
Tent m/36-20, used by the Finnish Defence Forces since 1936, is to my mind one of the most important winter items in the inventory of the FDF. There is room for a dozen or so people (including their equipment) and it is easy to put up and also easy to pack in 15 minutes.

No 63021.



No 44228.


Offline Kaifus

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2013, 06:07:17 pm »
I wish I could have been there to learn how they smoke fish. I like that little smokehouse and its good to know that they can use it in winter but I'm surprised by the size of wood they are using. I have a pile of antique bricks that would be prefect for a smokehouse base...

Offline Mangrove

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2013, 03:04:41 pm »
I like that little smokehouse and its good to know that they can use it in winter but I'm surprised by the size of wood they are using.

I have a copy of a vintage smoking guide in Finnish. The book recommends using small pieces of wood, but does not totally ban using larger ones as seen on the photograph. Naturally the species of choice is alder.

Traditional dugout. No. 87666



Traditional sauna. No. 89089.



Traditional backpack with some winter gear visible. No. 113286.

« Last Edit: November 21, 2013, 03:06:34 pm by Mangrove »

Offline Mangrove

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2013, 09:26:58 am »
Traditional packboard made out of wood, used time to time before being replaced with a modern design during the 1950s or 60s. No. 99105.



Making a pulkka. No. 126947 and 126948.




Offline kinguq

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2013, 10:14:43 am »
Gorgeous. Amazing how close the technique of making a pulka seems to be to that of making a wood-canvas canoe.

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Offline HOOP

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #28 on: December 21, 2013, 12:17:13 am »
Traditional packboard made out of wood, used time to time before being replaced with a modern design during the 1950s or 60s. No. 99105.



Making a pulkka. No. 126947 and 126948.





Some observations: 

Great looking mortise and tenon joint on the pack frame.  You almost never see that these days.  Looks like it was steam bent too.  Looks like maybe burlap for the back band?  Very economical, no reason why every human on earth wanting a pack cannot have a decent pack frame using foundational skills and simple but strong materials.

Very interesting boat front shape on the pulkka.  I see some pulks today which I think are too wide and angular on the front, and not upswept to pull over logs and stay in the float trail.  My favourite pulk in my collection has a semi boat front. 

I have noticed in many of these archival photos the axes have a steel shield or wrap under the axe head. 



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"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline Mangrove

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Re: Finnish Wartime Photograph Archive
« Reply #29 on: December 21, 2013, 05:13:19 am »
Great looking mortise and tenon joint on the pack frame.  You almost never see that these days.  Looks like it was steam bent too.  Looks like maybe burlap for the back band? 

If you download the high-resolution image from the site, you may observe that the joint was finished with a screw and not glued as in the original design. The wood, based on the grain, the colour and the location where the photograph was taken, seems to be taken of a branch of a Norway spruce, which is the best of all indigenous species growing in Finland for this purpose.



« Last Edit: December 21, 2013, 05:15:38 am by Mangrove »