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Author Topic: Safety reminder – Running stoves and heaters inside enclosed shelters:  (Read 3727 times)

Offline HOOP

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Just so everyone knows and is reminded, Wintertrekking.com does not recommend, and strongly advises against the running of propane heaters or propane stoves inside any tent or enclosed shelter (cabin, trailer, ice shack, etc), where the heater is burning fuel and venting its exhaust gases inside.  Wintertrekking.com strongly advises against using a propane heater to sleep with inside a tent or any enclosed shelter (cabin, trailer, etc), because we do not think it is safe and you risk death.  Wintertrekking.com does not recommend the running of any stove or heater or lantern that burns any fuel (wood, gas, liquid fuels, wax, etc) at night when you are sleeping inside an enclosed shelter.  Burning devices and appliances should be extinguished (woodstoves let run down to coals and fully vented outside and air intake and pipe damper opened), and you should sleep cold, using your sleeping system (bags, pads, quilts, etc) to keep you warm, and your tent/shelter should have appropriate air vents and air intake that are opened at all times. 

Edit:  Note:  There are professional and competent outfitters and guides who have the knowledge, skills and experience to be able to set up woodstoves safely and burn them all night safely. They know how to set up properly to prevent pipe separations, smoke back drafts, maintain good air, and all the many precautions to prevent tent fires. They also know how to have people prepared for emergencies should an accident happen, however low the odds, just like at home.   :)
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 08:44:22 AM by HOOP »
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"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline DMarrone

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 :) Got it!
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Offline ravinerat

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Good advice. Get pretty sleepy in the portable hut using Mr. Buddy heater unless the windows are open.

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Offline jerryswiss

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Ditto that, thanks for the reminder and for looking out for everybody, and we certainly don't want to loose anybody.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 08:48:42 AM by jerryswiss »
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Offline HOOP

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I added a qualifying note in the original about burning a woodstove all night based on skills, knowledge, experience and competency.

Edit:  Note:  There are professional and competent outfitters and guides who have the knowledge, skills and experience to be able to set up woodstoves safely and burn them all night safely. They know how to set up properly to prevent pipe separations, smoke back drafts, maintain good air, and all the many precautions to prevent tent fires. They also know how to have people prepared for emergencies should an accident happen, however low the odds, just like at home.
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker

"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline wildernesstony12

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great advise hoop thanks, i am going to try to send some pictures of my set up do tell me anything that you might think will help my set up