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Author Topic: Brookies in the moonlight  (Read 4793 times)

Offline snowdog

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Brookies in the moonlight
« on: January 26, 2014, 04:56:54 PM »

No, I didn't catch this one in the moonlight, but I'm searching for other addicts that might have gained insight into the phases of the moon and catch-ability of brook trout.  I have read that brookies feed at night when there is a full moon, therefore, daytime fishing might not be so great.  Any experience with this?  Or do you feel it is more your choice of bait/lure during the full moon period?  Thanks for any info.

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 05:20:46 PM »
Nice catch snowdog. Good luck on figuring out the moon phase and feeding activity of the brook trout.

Cheers, Bioguide

Offline Kaifus

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 06:07:21 PM »
Beautiful fish Snowdog. If you don't mind saying I'd like to hear I bit about how and where you caught him. And what are you going to do with him now? Nothing beats smoked fish to me.

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2014, 06:21:17 PM »
Look for info on sea-trout fishing in the UK. These are migratory brown trout , same as steel head are migratory rainbows. They can be notoriously difficult to catch in day time so that one way of catching them is fly-fishing after dark.

As you can imagine the potential for snags or knots in the line is pretty high and there are plenty of tales of folk finally hooking one only to lose it when the line snaps due to a knot in the leader.
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Offline ravinerat

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2014, 08:01:03 PM »
I'm not a moon phase guy but do believe in barometric pressure affecting them. Early morning or late afternoon seems more productive. Shallow water under 10' but 3'seems most productive. Are you sure that is not a Splake? We call Brookies square tails for a reason.

RR
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Offline snowdog

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2014, 09:05:38 PM »
Well, Ravinerat, I have only fished that lake twice, the first time I didn't catch anything.  Ennis Lake is stocked with brook trout and splake.  I've never seen a splake before and in checking on it, I believe you are right!  It had flesh like a brookie, nice deep orange.  Tasted great!  I thought that if it was a splake it would look more like a lake trout.  I'm glad you pointed out the forked tail.  I was fishing in about 12 feet of water and down about 5 feet.  For brookies, and that's what I expected, I jig fairly fast and almost constantly...unless that doesn't work.  Then I vary my jigging from fast to quite slow.  Ennis Lake is close to the Boundary Waters outside of Ely.  One goes out on the Fernberg trail and then off on the Moose Lake road.  An easy walk in.  Only one other person was on the lake that day.  Nice cliffs in there with red and white pines.  Very pretty.  Barometric pressure I have read up on too.  I do prefer fishing early in the morning, just at day break.  I do catch brookies all the way up to noon on some days, but after that it gets pretty quiet.  I need to get home then, though ...wood heat, unless I'm gone camping.  Then we switch on the propane furnace.  Brookies, for me, are difficult to figure out.  Some days/years they can be easy to catch.  Other days...nothing.  But it is always great to get out there.  I often hear wolves and now and then they venture out on the lake for a look.  It's always nice to see otter tracks and even see them.  When driving out there last Friday morning I had a lynx walking down the road towards me.  She crossed the road in front of me and then crouched/layed down on the side of the road.  She looked at me and I looked at her.  It was love at first sight.

Offline Tomd

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2014, 03:02:22 AM »
I'd never heard of a splake, so I looked it up on Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splake
The one in the picture on Wikipedia looks a lot like your fish and they seem to be planted in Canadian lakes, so it looks like a "good catch" by Ravinerat. :)

Offline memaquay

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2014, 07:11:22 AM »
Yes, that is definitely a splake.  Splake are not as temperamental as true brookies.  They also tend to travel in big schools, so if you start getting bites, get the fish in very quickly and get your line back out down the hole.  The big ones will usually be very close to the bottom.  There doesn't seem to be a pattern for times of day, although i have never caught one in the winter after dark.  In the summer, I have caught some very large ones (7 pounds) right at dusk.  They are a "put and take" fish that is usually stocked in spring fed lakes around here.  They can't breed, so the population depends on restocking.

MNR has recently started stocking rainbow trout i the same lakes as the splake in Northern Ontario.  I like the rainbow because they do a fair amount of surface feeding, so they are fun on the fly rod.  However, I'm not a fan for eating them, I'll take the splake or brookies any day.

Offline GearFreak

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2014, 11:37:57 AM »
Yes, that is definitely a splake.  Splake are not as temperamental as true brookies.  They also tend to travel in big schools, so if you start getting bites, get the fish in very quickly and get your line back out down the hole.  The big ones will usually be very close to the bottom.  There doesn't seem to be a pattern for times of day, although i have never caught one in the winter after dark.  In the summer, I have caught some very large ones (7 pounds) right at dusk.  They are a "put and take" fish that is usually stocked in spring fed lakes around here.  They can't breed, so the population depends on restocking.

MNR has recently started stocking rainbow trout i the same lakes as the splake in Northern Ontario.  I like the rainbow because they do a fair amount of surface feeding, so they are fun on the fly rod.  However, I'm not a fan for eating them, I'll take the splake or brookies any day.

I love surface takes. It is what got me so hooked on fly fishing.  Watching a feeding fish sip a tom thumb was such a rush!

I like eating Rainbow, never had splake or brooks to compare.

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Offline ravinerat

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Re: Brookies in the moonlight
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2014, 12:01:08 PM »
Snow dog that is a decent fish regardless. The colours are amazing compared to the old Lakers I catch. As far as Specs. I have limited experience catching them. As some of ours lakes are pretty far back to get into for the day. That's why I bought the Snowtrekker. Check out Fishermans post. Look at the tail of his Brookies.

RR
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