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Author Topic: 3 pin boots for newbie  (Read 7598 times)

Offline Moondog55

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Re: 3 pin boots for newbie
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2014, 07:25:46 pm »
To make your confusion even worse I switched to double plastic touring boots a while ago and would not, now , use anything else.
But as Telemark skiers have switched almost universally to plastic boots good quality leather boots do turn up very cheaply from time to time. If you do decide to buy plastic boots allow a full half day for the fitting session and make all your decisions about socks before hand, once the inners are fitted it is too late to change your mind without going thought the whole fitting process a second time. As the fitted inners are so warm tho the need for really thick woollen socks isn't as great. I wear a combination of Injinji toe socks and a very light polyester ski sock; both calf length
Which brings up another point, underwear which works with leather boots won't work with fitted liners in plastic double boots, you want absolutely nothing inside your boot except the sock and at the moment boot cut long-johns are not as readily available as the ordinary units.
If you go with leather boots I highly recommend you also get some Berghaus Supergaiters if you can find any
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/350879282147?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649
They add a layer of protection to the leather boots as well as several degrees of warmth I'm on my third set and may buy those I linked to as they stopped making them about 6 years ago
As a general rule I have found that the better a ski is at turning the more you will benefit from plastic boots so if the majority of your ski touring is on flat areas with few long downhill runs then leather boots may be the better option. It is worth noting that over here not one of the hire companies and / or school groups uses a leather boot even for beginner skiers, the most popular beginners boot being the Garmont Excursion, I use Scarpa T1s for the resorts lifts and T2s for touring

Offline Tomd

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Re: 3 pin boots for newbie
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2014, 01:41:34 am »
I tried a pair of T3's, but found them too narrow so switched to the Garmonts. As far as the Berwins, I considered them too, but decided against them after reading about them breaking. To me, they aren't a "real" ski binding. They appear to be designed for scooting along while wearing winter boots, but just don't look like they could control a metal edged ski like a Voile or similar binding will. Plus, they are not a release binding, which for a beginner skier like me was an important consideration.

Offline Moondog55

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Re: 3 pin boots for newbie
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2014, 04:36:11 am »
Tom the T3 was an abortion of a boot, IMOHHO, made from leftovers, I tried it on and gave it the thumbs down in 90 seconds or so. I am lucky with ski boots as I have an "Italian foot" long and narrow ankles.

Most people find the Garmont a more comfortable boot; it is very popular here.

Offline Tomd

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Re: 3 pin boots for newbie
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2014, 01:25:08 am »
Moondog, I thought I had a narrow foot until I tried on the T3. I know Scarpa makes a T4, but never seen one in person. I was buying used boots. As few times as I was using them, the cost of new was ridiculous.

Offline Moondog55

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Re: 3 pin boots for newbie
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2014, 04:31:30 pm »
T1 boot is very narrow, T2 narrow T4 just a little wider and much lower and softer but when talking Scarpa and widths we are talking fractions
Leather boots have good longevity but tend to get softer and softer as they age and this gives less and less control.
A plastic boot on the other hand stay the same stiffness until the fail; although the usable life is about 400/500 hours actual skiing