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Author Topic: Ultralight Hot Tenting  (Read 38100 times)

Offline kinguq

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Ultralight Hot Tenting
« on: March 09, 2014, 09:05:36 pm »
Further to a trip report by Kaifus, where he said  "I am growing tired of lugging around so much extra weight because of my tent, stove and saw and axe and bigger heavier sled to accommodate them only to get to camp and have to go cut wood that I'm looking into a cold camp outfit. Its in bush travel and covering distance that I enjoy and the actual act of camping is of lesser importance. Too much time and effort seams to be devoted to the hot tent."

I have to agree, for a solo traveller. By necessity most of my winter travelling is solo, because no one wants to go with me! I find that the load is too heavy for one person breaking trail. I also find that the work of setting up camp and cutting the required amount of wood is just too much to be enjoyable. Of course all this is ameliorated if you have 2 or more people on the trip: less weight per person, take turns breaking trail, share the work etc.

I do like the comfort of hot tenting and I would find it hard to go back to cold camping at this point. However I would like to lighten the load to the point where I can carry everything in a small sled or toboggan, or even a backpack. This would mean a small tent and a small stove.

Chimpac suggests that this is possible: "There is not just cold and hot tent winter camping there is a third way, the almost hot tent, that uses a smaller wood burning stove (2 lbs) inside the tent for cooking and drying out your socks, boots, etc. " I would like to hear more about this and any other ideas people have for ultralight hot tenting for a solo tripper.

I should note that I am willing to give up some of the comforts of the hot tent. My main requirements would be:
1. Sitting headroom and a place to lie down;
2. Enough of a stove to cook one pot meals and dry my clothes in the evening.
3. The shelter should be very easy to set up and take down, and lightweight, obviously.

So, is anyone doing this? Let's hear some ideas.

Kinguq.

Offline brianw

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2014, 10:18:48 pm »
I was thinking the in the same light on how to reduce the weight and bulk of my shelter.  It weights 25+ pounds.  I already have a Titanium stove, so I can't go much lighter for the same size stove.  After hot tenting or hot hammocking in my case, I have no intention of going back to cold camping.

My thought was to remake my wedge tent with a lighter material.  I found this fabric here and it looks like it will meet the specs for a hot tent.

http://store.magnafabrics.com/Products-Versatech.html

The fabric description says it is "100% Polyester Flame Resistant, waterproof, highly breathable and packable, 58/60 inches wide, about 5.25 ounces/linear yard".  The weight works out to about 3oz/square yard. 

The only challenge with ordering from this place, is they only ship by the rolls listed (ie they don't cut yardage) and they only ship within the USA.  Also they don't seem to have any lighter colours at this time. 

Perhaps if there was enough interest in this fabric, a group buy could be organized to split up a roll.  The price is hard to beat at $2.50 per yard plus shipping.  I will contact Magna fabrics and see if a white or light sand colour fabric is available for this fabric.

Any thoughts on this?

Cheers

Brian

Offline Moondog55

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2014, 10:34:31 pm »
Well lots of people seem to do OK with the Go-Lite

http://www.golite.com/Shangri-La-5-Tent-P46714.aspx


Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2014, 10:38:03 pm »
There is always this option for light hot tenting, http://seekoutside.com. I know they are not canvas, so frost inside the tent will be a problem/concern, but some people just swear by them. they are other company to that make similar products. Some thing like this one for a solo traveler would be pretty sweet weight wise http://seekoutside.com/products/ultralight-tipis/tipittents/
Just some option. I'm thinking of going lighter to as soon as I can afford some Ethaproof/ventile fabric to make a round tent with short wall.

Anyway, I think there is a possibility to go around the weight. I mean it is not a problem if you base camp for  few days at the time but if you move every day, it is a bit of a pain.

Cheers

Offline buddhabelly

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2014, 10:51:51 pm »
I think this lean shelter from Cooke Custom would be a good candidate. While probably not as breathable, a stovepipe thimble could be added to the sidewall so you could have your heat, your seating and sleeping space. and it's light. that and a titanium stove (maybe Kifaru's folder) and it would make for a much lighter load vs trad canvas.

http://www.cookecustomsewing.com/leans.htm

Offline awbrown: N. Illinois, USA

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2014, 11:12:21 pm »
Cooke Custom Sewing is now providing light weight winter silnylon hot tents now, after several years of prototype testing in the BWCA. Check them out.
I love winter......I don't look fat in wool!

Offline Kaifus

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2014, 12:15:54 am »
Good topic Kinguq and I agree with what you said about enjoying the comforts of the hot tent and finding it hard to go back to cold camping and I like the 3rd option that Chimpac gave, that of the ultralight hot tent.

I've been looking at modern four-season tents but I haven't been impressed. I've been looking at the GoLite pyramid tarp tent as Moondog55 suggested, although the 3 person version...

I would not use the inner tent or floor but sew in a perimeter snow skirt and possibly have the tent poles the same style as my current tent where they are full length at each of the corners so the tent is free standing and hassle free for pitching and tear down. And maybe make a new stove for built for light weight and packability.

Offline Moondog55

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2014, 03:58:33 am »
I have acquaintances who have had both the 3 & 5 person Go-Lite and the comments are the same from both families the extra weight of the bigger tent is more than compensated for by the extra room and comfort/convenience. I too would add valances to whichever I bought

Offline ravinerat

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2014, 08:10:45 am »
There are lots of options for light weight but I think you give up comfort. I looked at these when I was looking at tents. Kifaru tipi tents. They are light weight and the stove is a folding stove for backpacking.  http://store.kifaru.net/shelters-c5.aspx
Scoutergriz has made a hybred tent out of Nylon and canvas. Down size the stove and your cutting out lots of weight. The Amo Can stove really cuts down on weight compared to the size of my Med Koni Ko. The smaller stoves don't need larger logs cut and smaller wood in them is fine. There are all sorts of light weight stoves in the Wood stove section you just need to find one to fit your purpose. Smaller the tent the less it will weigh. Lots of good links above to get you started with ideas.

RR
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Offline SupGen

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2014, 10:38:37 am »
  Wow, Aun that Seek Outside stuff looks really nice! Very versatile and efficient, this would be nice for 1-2 people: http://seekoutside.com/products/ultralight-tipis/backcountry-shelter/ . As far as condensation goes, the Tipis have an optional liner and all of their tents can use "nests" of varying sizes. The nests are bathtub floored "lean-tos" with three sides and the floor being waterproof and the fourth side bug-netting. I might be re-thinking my approach to gear... Thanks for the link!

Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2014, 01:58:20 pm »
I have not done it myself, but know a few guys who hunt big game out west who have set ups of this sort. I have the Go Lite Shangri-La 3 tent, and you can definitely convert it into a lightweight hot tent.

 

It is not going to be the largest shelter, but there is definitely room for a small stove. I have seen a guy on YouTube, who has done exactly that.

If you use the flysheet (without the nest), and use your trekking poles for the center pole, the weight of the tent will be 1 lb 8 oz. You can get a very light titanium stove from Titanium Goat (http://www.titaniumgoat.com/cstove.html) which weighs 1 lb 10 oz with the pipe and other gear, and you will end up with a shelter that weight 3 lb 2 oz. If you want to use the provided center pole for the SHangri-La 3 instead of your trekking poles, add another 12 oz. Either way, you get a hot tent for under 4 lb. Not too shabby. 

Seek Outside also has good stuff, and the owner is a nice guy. 
« Last Edit: March 10, 2014, 02:05:42 pm by Wood Trekker »

Offline Hutchy

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2014, 09:32:49 pm »
It is interesting. You know, with the lightweight backpacking crowd, they have definitions for everything, ultralight, superultralight, etc. They have gear lists with everything weighed, every gram accounted for. Grams make up ounces, which make up pounds. I think getting lighter begins this way. Make the big stuff lighter first, but the small stuff also matters.

For example. I love looking cool with a cotton anorak on, but my thrift store 5xl Nike pullover windbreaker does just as well, an weighs half of the other. Also, I mostly carry it anyway.

Ok, so for winter travel, does anyone have gear lists and weights? It might sound silly for a "heavy" camping website, but with traditional gear, it seems that we are limited to lakes and portages. I just got back from a short trip, and I put everything on the floor, and made a list. I am going to weigh everything and look at the list and see. For example, my toboggan weighs about 18 pounds. My entire summer backpack kit is nine pounds lighter than my winter toboggan...

My plan is to get some 1/8 inch and make a sled similar to one of the posters on here. Should eliminate ten pounds right off the bat. Also, I want to look into eliminating the ice chisel. An axe can chop a decent depression in ice for filling a pot with water, and I want to design a small auger or drill to get a hole for the water. Might save six pounds in losing the chisel.

I truly believe that the traditional gear does in general work better, so I am going to try to use traditional stuff. My base weight, Including ice chisel, saw, axe, tent, stove (when I finish it) and toboggan etc is about seventy five pounds. If I could get that down to fifty pounds? maybe even 45? It would add distance and enjoyment to my trips. Compromising safety is a concern, so we will see how it goes. 

Hutch
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2014, 08:55:57 am »
For what it's worth, here is some of my gear with the weights. Keep in mind I only cold camp. My three season weight (down to 32F or 0C) is 12 lb 7.1 oz. My winter weight (down to 0F or –18C) is 12 lb 8.8 oz, although I've pushed it before down to -15F. The weights are very similar because the only major change is the sleeping bag. My down winter sleeping bag compresses to and weighs about the same as my old synthetic three season bag, keeping the weights similar. If I use the thicker winter sleeping bag (down to –25F or –32C) and the larger pack, my base weight would be 16 lb 14.8 oz. Add another 2 lb 8oz for snowshoes.

[video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8o95Dug4rY[/video]

Hope the video works... I guess not. I have no idea for to embed a video. 

Offline southcove

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2014, 01:07:48 pm »
I am struggling w this concept too.  We are painfully moving from a smallish (9 x 12') base camp canvas wall tent setup (normally <1 mile from plowed turnout) with (more) 1-3 people cold tenting.  We have a medium size stove, roughly 12 x 12 x 20" that must weigh 30lbs.

To move further out on the lakes we need to drop the wall tent (and frame), stove and purchase (all smaller and lighter) new tent, new stove, new tobaggon, etc... (or cheaper still, start working out and be better organized for next winter!)

Whatever we do it will help the economy $$$ !




Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Ultralight Hot Tenting
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2014, 02:16:28 pm »
For info my (just over) 8 x 8 cotton tent weighs 11 lb. I have made a set of poles because it saves so much time on set up and helps maximize the internal space in the tent.

If you made a cotton pyramid it would be even lighter and would need only a single pole.

I could/should leave a lot of the junk I bring behind. I took a folding chair last time but spent most of the time sat on my food box as it has been reinforced specifically for this purpose.

I have a "lightweight" cast iron fry pan it does make good bannock but for the weekend I should just bring pita.

My stove is heavy. I have a ti goat stove that needs a new chimney so maybe I will try that next year.

Big axe plus a small belt axe. Custom F1 and maybe a small knife for carving. Couple of saws. Bags of cord, spare bungees, all could be pared down but then when I get asked "have you got a spare..." I'll just have to shrug and say sorry!
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