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Author Topic: Naptha Lanterns  (Read 9128 times)

Offline Rob

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Naptha Lanterns
« on: January 25, 2009, 10:40:51 pm »
I tried to light my Coleman Lantern last night, but it wouldn't go. The temperature was -25C.

Could it have been the lantern or the cold?

I also have a old coleman flameless naptha heater. This I know work, I lit it during the summer. Do these give off enough heat to keep your tent warmer through the night. Is there CO2 issues using one of these in a tent?
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Offline HOOP

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2009, 11:18:37 pm »
In order for a lantern to keep you warm, you would need to keep most of the air in, and that will kill you.  A lantern�s combustion products vents into the living space.

No one, ever, ever, ever, should burn anything in a confined space and shut down the air circulation.    A lantern can take the edge off for sure, but you need full through flow of fresh air, and so you can�t heat a tent in winter safely.   Lanterns are not stoves � they don�t have pipes exiting the dwelling.  Besides, a good sleeping bag and sleeping clothing is all you need.

Hot tents have roof vents for several reasons.   One is to ensure air through flow.   A woodstove is safe in a hot tent because it is drawing through an open door, and the roof vents are open, AND its fumes are being vented outside via a pipe.  You can go to sleep safely with a non air tight stove gradually cooling down � open the pipe damper and let it draw well.  Even if some CO2 and CO leak, the tent is well vented by the floor through the door, and up high through the roof vents. 

To keep the small amount of heat inside from a lantern, you would be keeping most of the exhaust gases in, and you could wake up dead.

Sadly, several people die every year from CO poisoning, usually in summer camps, running propane appliances inside.    They never wake up. 


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Offline Georgi

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2009, 01:25:37 am »
could be that your pump isn't pressurising the fuel or there's a blockage so fuel isn't being delivered, or well, could be a few things.

Like Hoop says , don't do it.

That heater has a catalyst and will produce CO and deplete the Oxygen levels in an enclosed space.
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Offline memaquay

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2009, 07:46:19 am »
Was it lighting at all, or was there no pressure, period?  Did you over fill it?  They should only be about 2/3 full....

I have to disagree with the safety comments, with a "depends" comment.  For 45 years, our club had been burning naptha lanterns in large canvas prospector tents.  There is a tradition of doing this in the north.  A prospector tent is far from "tight".   The tent flaps do not seal, but are loosely tied...there are holes in each end for the ridge ropes....even the floor and the tent walls are only loosley held together by a few rocks.  And the lanterns do provide heat, although at -25 I'm not to sure of their effectiveness...but certainly down to -7 to -ten, they will make the inside of the tent warmer than the outside temperature.  As I have mentioned in a previous thread, the biggest fear is wear to safely place the lantern.  Ours are always hung from a substantial ridge rope.  So if you are in a canvas prospector tent, I'd say burn away.

Offline Georgi

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2009, 08:19:16 am »
memaquay,  We burn a Naptha Lantern while in our prospector, the issue I think Rob was asking was about a Naptha heater.

We still don't use the lantern as a heating appliance but the BTU's from a roaring fire in a woodstove is much more effective at warming the body completely.
IN ICE WE TRUST ,In Snow we must, go camp in frozen Country. With axe and Saw for Timber is Law, to make our homes more comfy
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Offline Rob

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2009, 08:42:58 am »
Last year I had the lantern completely apart. Cleaned every piece as best I could and carefully put it all back together.

It did not seem to be pressurizing as you put it. Did not light at all. I will bring it in the house and try it see if that changes. I haven't lit it since I cleaned it becaseu I have had a very hard time finding a mantle. It is an odd-ball model only built for a short time in Canada only and the run lasted a relatively short time.

Rob, That is what I wanted to know. The heater is another issue. I would not want to run it in my North Face one person Goretex tent, but in a smaller canvas tent was my thought. Even an open ended Mason Tent.

The heater I am thinking can help keep the tent warmer while the woodstove burns out overnight.
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Offline Ted

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2009, 11:59:45 am »
Hey Rob,
as it doesn't seem to be pressurizing, did you check to see if it had the winter leather pump cup rather than the black plastic?  In cold weather there is too much blow-back with the plastic so no pressure buildup. Same with the Coleman white-gas stoves.
Just a thought.

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Offline scoutergriz

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2009, 12:26:46 pm »
Coleman heaters are designed for use in tents with a minimum of 16 sq in of ventilation (4x4"),However, I would be inclined to have a flap open at least a full hand span on opposite sides, preferably one high and one low. I have used a variety of heaters and lanterns  in several different types of tents for more than 40 years now and never had any ill effects.
A few precautions are wise though- ensure you have flow-through ventilation. make sure the appliance is in a safe location on a non-flammable surface. fuel and light outdoors away from the tent, and at the FIRST SIGN of a headache or nausea take it (and you) outside and double check (and increase) your ventilation.
Rob- what is the model of your lantern- I may have parts and suggestions for you.

Offline FlatbowMB

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2009, 12:56:18 pm »
I have used a variety of heaters and lanterns  in several different types of tents for more than 40 years now and never had any ill effects.



I remember once speaking to a 75 year old farmer that told me that whenever he a pesticide sprayer nozzle get clogged, he' unscrew it and blow the clog out with his mouth.  Said he never had a problem from it... would I recommend it to anyone? Probably not.



Offline Rob

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2009, 01:14:12 pm »
Rob- what is the model of your lantern- I may have parts and suggestions for you.

I think it is model 333. I am at work getting paid to post here right now  ;) I will check it out when I go home and verify the model number.

I think I am going to buy a new one anyways.


But the pump having a winter cup and summer cup. I thought they were all leather.
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Offline Ted

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2009, 03:45:28 pm »
All the Coleman white gas stoves/lanterns that I've seen over the last number of years, come with the black plastic - ok for summer, useless for winter. I buy the so-called winter leather cup for year-round use.  A little drop of oil ever year keeps the leather nice and supple.
I think I might still have the odd plastic cup in my repair kit, maybe not.

Ted
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Offline lookinnorth

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2009, 03:59:16 pm »
If I had to guess I would think along the same lines as Ted, check to see if it has the leather pump cup or the black neoprene cup.

 First night on our camp this weekend I brought a Coleman 425 two burner stove (I had another two burner along as well) which I hadn't changed to the leather pump cup (we have most of our Coleman lanterns/stoves switched to the leather pump cup but not the one I brought :-[.) Went to light it for some hot water, and no go, no pressure, I tried it at home and knew it worked good.

 Figured it was the cold, pulled the pump assembly out (of the tank) and carefully warmed it over the lantern to loosen up the rubber cup. It worked, pumped the stove up and boiled some water. Anyway, I had another leather pump cup and oil with with me in our kit and changed it the next day.  Those leather pump cups are about 5-6 $ at CTC.





Offline scoutergriz

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2009, 04:48:58 pm »
Rob; that model takes a 500cp Coleman # 11 or 1111. Some other manufacturers use a similar size, Century and Petromax are two that immediately come to mind- just make sure it's 500 or 550cp.
Flatbow; there is a big difference between naptha heaters and pesticide sprayers-tent heaters are designed to use in TENTS, sprayers are designed to spray POISON. Coleman tent heaters are designed specifically to be used safely in tents as long as you use a little common sense and actually burn very efficiently (+-15ppm CO)- you will deplete all the oxygen long before you have a co issue

Offline Georgi

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2009, 07:46:19 pm »
Please check that model no 333. maybe the year too. We need pictures too!

Some of us enjoy a look into things that spark and light and well, sometimes don't work!

Could it be a 222 the little small lantern or is this some huge old bugger?
IN ICE WE TRUST ,In Snow we must, go camp in frozen Country. With axe and Saw for Timber is Law, to make our homes more comfy
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Offline Rob

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Re: Naptha Lanterns
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2009, 08:11:27 pm »
Model 335.

I have looked at your great little website there and there is little info on the site about this lantern.

To be honest it looks just like the newer models.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2009, 09:25:40 pm by Rob »
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