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Author Topic: Stove pit  (Read 1810 times)

Offline Bioguide

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Stove pit
« on: March 18, 2015, 09:19:44 pm »
My last winter camping trip video included me setting up my tent and digging out the stove pit. I've been asked, and I am curious myself now, why dig out the stove pit in a hot tent?

My initial answer to this question was that: I had no practical reason to dig the stove pit and that I only recalled reading somewhere the suggestion to do so (perhaps from Snow Walkers Companion Winter Camping Skills for the North). I could have just as easily floated the stove on the snow but that I do like the little shelf/ledge it creates so you can sit and dangle your feet into the "pit" while cooking and eating.

So what say ye all? Is there a more practical reason for digging a stove pit or doesn't it really matter?

Edit: I now see this as referred to as a "kitchen pit". Page 100 of The Winter Wilderness Companion by the Conover's.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2015, 09:40:59 pm by Bioguide »

Offline Mike B.

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Re: Stove pit
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2015, 10:37:08 pm »
We usually lay a log across the tent about 5' in and dig out the whole entry.  It makes a good place for a chair to sit on while cooking and putting on boots.  A three guys can sit on the log and one on a chair.  That leaves an 8'x10' platform for sleeping and lounging.
"You can pay me when you see me again Josie Wales"

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Stove pit
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2015, 12:30:59 am »
The main reason for me are the same as yours. Plus I think also that it traps cold air down in the pit and makes for a warmer tent... Like they do in a igloo.


Offline southcove

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Re: Stove pit
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2015, 10:24:23 am »
For me, with my back wall stove jack, it was a necessity...you just couldn't keep tromping over the snow from the door at the front. 

Now with a standard by the front door stove jack, I am 2 for 3 on 'having' to dig out the stove area.  The first time, two dogs in camp just wouldn't let the snow consolidate enough to set up by the time we were ready to get inside.   The second time, the whole inside area had to be dug out due to snow pack depth and not being able to get it to set up firm enough.  (wish I knew going in which way it was going to turn out!). 

The lower pit concept was something I was taught as well in a wilderness survival course, using snow shelters. 

Offline lifeintheround

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Re: Stove pit
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2015, 10:40:37 am »
Place a highly reflective material under and around your stove and you will not need a pit and you will see very limited snow melt. Such items that work well are aluminum flashing, stucture wrap, reflective welding fabric or even aluminum foil glued to something slightly rigid.  Try it you will be amazed!