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Author Topic: Pop ups  (Read 2881 times)

Offline ravinerat

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Pop ups
« on: November 15, 2014, 09:38:46 am »
I have seen a few people make a hot tent out of a pop up fish hut.minseemed to work really well. I believe the material is fire retardant. The one draw back is the size. I was in Cabella's last night and these things have gotten huge. There was one you could put 4 cots in easily. I think it was a Frabril. I think it was priced just over $400 but can't remember since there were several models. Might be worth a look for someone who can't a fort the cost of some of these hot tents.

RR
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Offline rbinhood

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Re: Pop ups
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2014, 11:22:43 am »
A few years ago I took an Eskimo Quickfish6 (looks like a double connected cube: http://www.geteskimo.com/foundations/store/shopdetail.asp?params=69149*109&tab=desc1) and removed one of the windows, which are held in by Velcro, and replaced it with a piece of siliconized fiberglass (fireproof tarp material) with a stove hole in it. It was a simple swap, as I just cut the stove jack material the same size as the window and put Velcro on the edges like the window had. This shelter has worked well for me as a simple, quick Winter tent where weight is not an issue (I think the shelter weighs about 42 lbs). It is a relatively cheap way to get into Winter car camping as the shelters retail for about $320.00, but can be had on sale for about $225.00. I even saw a used one on Craigslist recently for $175.00. The shelters have many tie-outs, making them reliable in the wind. A heavy, wet snow might collapse the roof.
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Offline Aarona

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Re: Pop ups
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2014, 10:59:06 pm »
I did a thimble opening for Kni Co stove in a 6x12 pop up house several yrs ago and it works fine for trips where you're not hauling by hand forever. Yes heavy snow would collapse the roof, but if the weather is forecasted for that just run a rope and tarp for a fly-like cover over the majority of it and I think you'd be fine. We've stayed out on lakes and in the woods. It does get you a shelter you can run a wood stove in for pretty cheap compared to other options.

Offline ravinerat

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Re: Pop ups
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2014, 09:57:50 am »
I didn't realize the roof was not able to withstand snow load.  I have only seen a few two man with stoves in them.

RR
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Offline bobbyz04

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Re: Pop ups
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2014, 06:37:11 pm »
A few years ago I took an Eskimo Quickfish6 (looks like a double connected cube: http://www.geteskimo.com/foundations/store/shopdetail.asp?params=69149*109&tab=desc1) and removed one of the windows, which are held in by Velcro, and replaced it with a piece of siliconized fiberglass (fireproof tarp material) with a stove hole in it. It was a simple swap, as I just cut the stove jack material the same size as the window and put Velcro on the edges like the window had. This shelter has worked well for me as a simple, quick Winter tent where weight is not an issue (I think the shelter weighs about 42 lbs). It is a relatively cheap way to get into Winter car camping as the shelters retail for about $320.00, but can be had on sale for about $225.00. I even saw a used one on Craigslist recently for $175.00. The shelters have many tie-outs, making them reliable in the wind. A heavy, wet snow might collapse the roof.
I have used my Eskimo Fatfish 9416 on multiple winter camping/ice fishing trips. It has work great. I learned the roof top snow load problem first hand my first trip and it was a solo mission. I now bring along 2 telescoping camping poles and use them to support the roof at the 2 center points of each section. It works great and you can hang items off of the one closest to the wood stove for drying. I would rather have a light weight winter tent but I only do 1 trip a year with ice fishing being the main focus . So using my using the eskimo makes sense. Also adding a tarp over the shelter creates a dead air space cutting down the condensation is a must.