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Author Topic: Thoughs on Arctic Oven tents  (Read 7091 times)

Offline rbinhood

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Re: Thoughs on Arctic Oven tents
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2014, 09:47:20 pm »
I am told there is only one mill left in the world making 4 ounce cotton sail cloth, located in Scotland. I have no idea what they would charge per yard of fabric, or if they would sell in small quantities, but I am sure that by the time you factor in international shipping, the cost would be prohibitive.

I do have a link to a site in the U.S. making 6 ounce cotton tent cloth that is reasonably priced. If you do the math, 2 extra ounces per yard really doesn't add up to much more weight for a standard size tent.

The cost of Ventile is outrageous. I think if you got a spark hole in a Ventile tent, you'd probably cry.

"Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify."
Henry David  Thoreau

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Thoughs on Arctic Oven tents
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2014, 09:59:38 pm »
If the 6oz is as good as The stuff Snowtrekker tent uses, I'm all for you t give me the info 8)

Offline chimpac

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Re: Thoughs on Arctic Oven tents
« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2014, 08:49:07 am »
Any stove, any campfire emits radiant heat like the sun. The radiation is greatest from the hottest parts of the stove.
So in order to get maximum radiant heat from a stove it has to be shining like a sun on you. Each surface of a stove radiates in the direction that surface is facing.
The surfaces of a stove that are facing toward the ground or straight up is lost radiant heat. There is little radiant heat getting to a body in the tent if a stove is laying low and horizontal in a corner of the tent. This is why a stove sitting up off the ground and vertical delivers more radiation sideways instead of a horizontal stove that radiates mostly up and down.
I was just this morning trying to use reflectors to direct radiant heat from the top and bottom of a little vertical stove I was cooking my breakfast on.
Radiant heat is the most important type of heat when there is no insulation to keep heated air warm. This is why big warehouses are often heated with hot pipes with reflectors near the ceiling that shine down to the occupants on the floor.
If your boots were below the stove shown in my pictures they would get hot from radiation not heated air which makes its way fast to the cold skin of the tent roof.
There is a puddle of water under the stove in one of the pictures. That ice was not melted by heated air. The air at the ice would be the coldest air in the tent
I edited the gospel of radiation.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2014, 09:26:37 am by chimpac »

Offline Moondog55

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Re: Thoughs on Arctic Oven tents
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2014, 03:59:11 pm »
Robinhood that isn't exactly right
Bradmill in Australia sent their mill to China and the 4 ounce cotton is readily available here.
I sent a sample to Garret Conover and he liked the fabric but Kevin Kinney thought it was far too light weight for use in parkas.
It isn't cheap tho
I have offered to send samples to anybody that wants one as I have some here and I can readily purchase more.
You have to keep in mind that this fabric is loomstate and will rot very quickly if packed away damp and has no waterproofing at all.
Some-one on another forum has asked for some and my beloved is taking a package over as she is going to NY to see her family
Postage will double the cost of the fabric and it is about half the price of the lightweight Ventile. Ventile is how-ever a much better fabric for tents.