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Author Topic: Hot Tent and Stove  (Read 10532 times)

Offline Miz Moosie

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2009, 11:00:45 AM »
Here is a link to a canvas tent company that makes single pole tents:

http://denvertent.com/final/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=39_40&products_id=387

The website is not easy to navigate but the herder tents have various options which may be suitable for winter trekking.  The options for sizes and extras are selectable. 

This company purchased the Colorado Tents co. which made the tent I and others on this board use.

Sorry OAF, I doesn't look like really light weights are available.   :'(
2008 Winter Rendezvous "Golden Spatula Award" Winner (Winning recipe:  filet mignon with wine, shallots, garlic and dijon mustard served over orzo with butterd brussel sprouts and Black Currant Mead)

Offline jaunty

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2009, 12:06:26 PM »
Quote
Quote from: Oldand Fat on Today at 07:03:13 AM
I don't want to be a pain in the A** but I'm seriously considering a hot tent and size and weight are VERY important to me as an Old Fart. [End Quote]
And another one bites the dust...
 Grin

Check out the lightweight rigs in this thread on the viability of hot-tenting for small parties: 

http://wintertrekking.com/index.php?topic=382.0

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2009, 12:09:50 PM »
Morning Pathfinder:
                             I don't want to be a pain in the A** but I'm seriously considering a hot tent and size and weight are VERY important to me as an Old Fart.
The tent is an Alaskan 9X9 made of Sunfogger =$425
The Stove is 9X9X18 =$155
Stove Bag =$40
Is this correct?
Stay safe
OAF

Nope.

Alaskan Tent 9x9 Army Duck Sunforger = 425
Stove is 10 x 10 x 22 = 165 includes piping
Bag for stowing tent = free

I gave a 300 deposit and the balance paid at the postal outlet was 349.00.

Total = 649.00 shipped

Hope this helps...

Cheers
Shawn

Hey Shawn

Where is Sproule Lake. I can't find it, or rather I have found a few!

Daniel.

Sproule Lake is located north of hwy 60 directly above the #10 entrance on you APP map. Look at the end of the 1345 portage off hwy 60.  From there you can check out a number of places on snowshoe. 

Sid,

I will post the weight of the stove when I get home this afternoon.

Cheers
Shawn

Offline HOOP

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2009, 01:06:17 PM »
Hi Pathfinder,

Looks like a fun rig.  But I had one observation on your stove which may....uh....be a downer (if I see the photos correctly).   The crimps on the stove collar are pointing up.   That means that the stove pipe female end on all the joints are facing down?   That means that creosote will flow down and leak out around the pipe joint.    This is also a fire hazard.

The general rule of stove pipes is that female faces up, male crimped ends face down, so that creosote flow stays inside and is burned when it drips back into the stove or lower hot pipes.

Potential solution:  You might be able to cut a female collar extension from a pipe section, drill and steel rivet it, and then seal the gap with stove cement, and then you are good to go with your pipes.

Good luck!
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker

"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline jaunty

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2009, 02:42:31 PM »

I don't know whether it might be possible to "uncrimp" the collar, perhaps by hammering it against a piece of steel. 

I find that hammers, brute force and ignorance make a powerful combination. 


Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2009, 04:14:31 PM »
jaunty,

That last line cracked me up!

HOOP,

I find it interesting that you mention the proper way to install piping.  I juts read about that in your equipment section last night and was contemplating what to do.

I think I will simply cut the steel rivets (there's only two of them) holding the collar on and not use any collar but just slide down the male end of my first 18" pipe through the opening.  Voila!  What do you think? 




Then I will get to cutting my hole(s) for my pots.  I was thinking about two holes?  No?  Just one?  I have room for two.  But I could just cut one, if you suggest it.  I'm putting a lot of stock in your opinion HOOP, no pressure though.  Haha




Cheers
Shawn



Offline jaunty

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2009, 04:46:23 PM »
I realize that you're looking for HOOP's opinion on this, but I'd be concerned that you wouldn't get a very solid connection to the stove.  It might also let in more air than you would want. 

What about drilling out the rivets and turning the collar upside-down, so that it's entirely inside the stove?  Then maybe you could stick the male end of your lowest pipe into it. 

Quote
That last line cracked me up!

I'll have you know that I've built a couple of trail stoves mainly through the liberal use of rubber mallets, hardwood blocks, brute force and ignorance.  No bending brakes required! 
« Last Edit: February 28, 2009, 04:50:37 PM by jaunty »

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2009, 05:03:01 PM »
I realize that you're looking for HOOP's opinion on this, but I'd be concerned that you wouldn't get a very solid connection to the stove.  It might also let in more air than you would want. 

What about drilling out the rivets and turning the collar upside-down, so that it's entirely inside the stove?  Then maybe you could stick the male end of your lowest pipe into it. 

Quote
That last line cracked me up!

I'll have you know that I've built a couple of trail stoves mainly through the liberal use of rubber mallets, hardwood blocks, brute force and ignorance.  No bending brakes required! 


That's a great idea! 

And my question wasn't really specific to HOOP, that was just me trying to be wise guy, tongue in cheek so to speak, with HOOP.  ;D  I value everyone's opinion here and learn something from every thread I read.

Thanks again for the tip jaunty!  And be careful when swinging those rubber mallets around!   :D

Cheers
Shawn

Offline kinguq

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2009, 07:28:56 PM »
For the pot holes I have the following suggestion. Pot lids make really good covers for your pot holes. Go to Rebuilt Resources and buy a couple of pot lids of the right size for 50 cents each or whatever. When I was there the other day they had all kinds. Then cut the holes to fit the lids (and your pots of course).

I will warn you that sheet metal is really nasty stuff to work with, in my experience. Be careful and wear gloves when you can. A jigsaw with the proper blade will work but it is sometimes hard to keep the stove from "oilcanning" and vibrating excessively, unless you can brace it properly. Someone told me that a Dremel tool works well for doing precise cuts but I have never tried it. Don't use tin snips as they just make a mess.

Daniel.

Offline Ted

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2009, 08:31:02 PM »
My impression after building several stoves is that you're going to need a ring for the stove pipe.
If you're going to make two pot holes, then a side-to-side support bar underneath and between the two holes is needed to stop excessive warping from the heat.

fwiw,
cheers Ted
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Offline HOOP

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2009, 10:57:19 PM »
Hi Pathfinder,

Lots of sound advice above.

1)  RE collar:   I too agree that without a collar, there is potentially a worrisome lack of stability at the crucial first joint on the stove.   The problem with an inner extension is that it will get bonked when you are feeding wood in.   I suggest a collar above the stove.   I think it is an easy fix.  Either place a collar around the existing one by cutting a piece of stovepipe and riveting into the side of the original like I mentioned in the post above, sealing the seam below with stove cement;....or, it looks like you could drill out those rivets, cut a female collar, and with tin snips make the same flanges for inside and re-rivet?    Maybe not a big job at all?  Half hour at most?  (I am not that handy with tools, so what I "think" is easy may not be.   :)    Regardless, I reccomend sealing the area around the collar with stove cement, because sparks will fly out of there through the tiniest of cracks. 

Note:  When hauling the stove, I protect the collar with a small coffee can cut in half and placed over it, so that the collar does not get dented.   I carry the stove in an old canvas hockey bag, so the coffee can piece stays pressed on it. 

2)  Re pot holes:  Looking at the pic, I think 2 pot holes may cause too much loss of structural integrity of the top, unless you installed a reinforcing piece underneath like Ted mentioned.  Then it would be fine I think.  Maybe a piece of angle steel would work, although you would have to design a fastening bracket inside of some sort.   

I find that one pot hole in the front works well for my stove.  I make concentric ring supports for the smaller pots, as shown in the "Hot Camping" subsection in the "Equipment" section.  The back area near the pipe is the hottest top surface, and when the burn is right, its easy to boil water back there with my smaller pots.   But when the wood is wet, I sometimes wish I had a second pot hole, but my stove is not long enough for that.  If my stove was longer, I would cut a second hole.   I don't have a reinforcing rod with the single hole in my stove, and the surface does warp and sag.

Kinguq makes a good point about cutting sheet metal.  On my stove, I used a jigsaw with sheet metal blade, drilling a start hole.  I was wearing gloves and goggles and ear protection for sure (very noisy!).  I used a round chain saw file to file off the burrs and sharp edge of the hole to make it safe.   Measure several times before cutting! ;)    Looking forward to the mods pics!   :)
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker

"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline Zelandonii

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2009, 11:49:42 PM »
Shawn,

One other option with your collar is to leave what you have now and make the adjustment on your piping by designating your first section to be a female to female piece by cutting off the crimped male end.

I've done this to both of my stoves that I built and never have i had any problems w/ creosote dripping in. Because a lot of heat comes through that first pipe section, any creosote that might drip simply burns off inside the pipe and not out. Very little if any actually make the stove surface.

This pic shows my set-up, which is similar to yours. I did this to have a more solid way to attach my pipes to the stove and to also have the space to install a damper.


With regards to your cooking cutouts, reinforcing helps prevent warping. Even one hole will warp your stove if you don't support the top. I used some scrap metal that i folded into a triangulated beam and rivetted this onto the top to prevent warping.


After 20burns, my top still hasn't warped even with two cutouts.



Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2009, 11:21:45 AM »
Daniel,

Thanks for the tips!  Yeah, that metal can be nasty stuff to work with so I will be bringing my stove to a friend at JJ Machine Works to fab what I need done. 

Ted,

Great idea on the support bars.  I don't want to compromise the stove so I think I will have that done too.  But I will see if I can do that on the inside so that a fry pan can still slide around on the top.

Hoop,

I like the coffee can idea and the duffel bag for a carry bag!  I think I may have a solution for the collar as you, and others, have suggested.  Another member has been gracious enough to send me the inverted version for the collar.  This way I will be able to start with the female end first.

Also, I will do the two hole setup as my stove is 22" long and has the room.  I'll place the largest hole towards the back near the pipe.

Zel,

Nice stove! 

Yes, I will definitely do the supports as you and Ted have suggested.  But I will try to stay away from anything protruding as I am a bit hard on things and can for see myself damaging the exposed collar in transport, at some point. 

I wish I had the means and know how to fabricate some of this stuff myself.  It's much more gratifying knowing you built and designed your own stuff, rather than paying for it. 

But at least I'm in the game regardless of how I got here.  ;D

Thanks again for all the tips and ideas!  I have a busy Monday morning!  Keep ya posted!

Cheers
Shawn


Offline jimdiane

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #28 on: March 01, 2009, 01:53:01 PM »
I also have the Atuk Alaskan, but i think it may be 10 X 10, i may be wrong ??? I really like the tent, for up to 2 people (we like to have our gear in the tent) Not sure what it weighs, but is kinda heavy, pretty thick material. Folding it away after a trip, is a bit of a job. Setting up is quite easy, even easier with 2 people. I find setting it up on my own is best if i put a rope through the top lop of the tent and try to string it up between 2 trees and haul it up, after that I can set up the single pole and all the corner tie downs without the tent falling over ;) Overall for the price, this is a great tent, going to get a new stove for next year.
One thing I don't like is the location of the exit hole for woodstove, too close to the door.

jim

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Hot Tent and Stove
« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2009, 03:13:03 PM »
Hey Jim,

Yeah I'm thinking mine will be perfect for two and gear.  But I'm sure I could accommodate three, we'll just have to leave some gear outside when that presents itself.

I have been kicking around ideas on what to use for a single pole to hold up my tent and this is what I stumbled on today @ Home Depot.   

It's a pole for drywall installers to hold drywall up to the ceiling before installation.



Easy to use quick release ratchet system



And then it extends to almost 10 feet! I only pulled it out a bit for you to get an idea.



Only weighs a few pounds and cost $29.99!!  It will hold 110 lbs.  If I had one made, the material would cost more than that!

Also, I picked up a couple of C-Vent 26 gauge adjustable elbows for 5$ a piece.  I could not find ANY 4" black pipe in the city.  Nothing.  But this is 26 gauge and a lot better suited than my 28 gauge elbow.



And a couple of bags of tent pegs.  11.5 " long for winter use.  $3.99!



And last but not least, an olive barrel i picked up when I was down in Toronto last week. Free.



Cheers
Shawn