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Author Topic: Going Down - to the foot region!  (Read 8183 times)

Offline Georgi

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Going Down - to the foot region!
« on: December 29, 2007, 01:41:44 pm »
Question to ask:

What is on top of the snowshoes and under the pants? Boots!
They make em' in all sizes and styles but what's the best choice you made?

Oversize a bit?
What would you normally wear in size.
What about the socks inside , layering or just one big fluffy pair?

Post away!

Currently I have a Sorel type boot by Mark's Work Wearhouse which I have a size bigger than what I'm normally wearing ( size 11's) . To boot,  ;D , I also bring with me 3 socks to wear if I feel the need. 1st sock is a poly sock for a simple layer, second is a wool sock which is fairly close fitting and then I also have bigger style woollies mammoths to go over that all should I feel I need that extra cushioning layer between me and the bottom of the boot which I find for me is that I'm hot toed and sweat a lot. So, rather than fighting that fact, I stay as warm as I need to and change/alternate my socks daily, closer to camp I might change the socks midday or just not wear the poly socks 1st layer.

« Last Edit: December 29, 2007, 02:01:52 pm by Georgi »
IN ICE WE TRUST ,In Snow we must, go camp in frozen Country. With axe and Saw for Timber is Law, to make our homes more comfy
;)



Georgi

Offline scouter Joe

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2007, 07:02:14 pm »
My Boots are Terra safety boots . I wear these for work and need the safety toes . They are the same size as my regular boots and shoes and I wear one pair of wool / nylon blend work sox in them . I'm like Georgi and my feet sweat easily so I always have spares and change to a dry pair each day .
 I've got to many different shoes now so I do not have a dedicated pair for camping . scouter Joe

Offline Rick

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2007, 08:55:11 pm »
Sorel Conquest - Never been cold and never been wet. These do not have removable liners, but that is a none issue for me, as my feet don't sweat. Yes, that's right, dry feet. Mine are 1/2 size larger than I normally wear, which leaves room fo a second pair of socks and still have wiggle my toes room inside.

Offline Canoedog

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2007, 11:24:43 pm »
Sorels - probably about 27 years old. I've had to repair them once at the heels where the rubber and leather join but still going strong although the soles are a wee bit worn and smooth. Same size as usual footwear, layered with a pair of polypro socks and thick wool socks. I also add a pair of felt insoles inside the felt liners, helps when standing around. Change socks everyday to dry and always carry a spare pair if required during the day. I also have some Columbia Bugaboo hiker style boots but use them mostly for just day trip snowshoeing - I find that gaiters help when using shorter boots for snowshoeing as well.
Sid
"There are no shortcuts to anyplace worth going" - anon.

Offline lost_patrol

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2007, 12:25:23 am »
Most of the time, I use the same system as Canoedog.  Rubber bottoms are essential in mixed conditions, i.e. puddles and salt in the parking lots, slush under the snow on the lakes, and so on.  Polypro liner socks and wool or wool blend outer socks for warmth and to avoid the friction that causes blistering, spare felt liners to keep the feet dry.

In dry snow and cold weather, I prefer mukluks.  Leather moccasin foot and canvas upper, military surplus duffle liners, with fiberglass mesh and felt insoles for additional warmth and air circulation under the foot.  The good news is they're light and comfortable, the bad news is that the leather bottoms are very slippery when not using snowshoes.  Also, they would be absolutely useless (and probably illegal) in a work environment because of the lack of protection.
"Give me winter, give me dogs.  You can keep the rest."  - Knud Rasmussen
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Offline Oldand Fat

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2007, 12:13:10 pm »
OK The title caught my attention ::)
Trying a new to me system.
I have a pair of Kaufman Sorel Snowbear Rubber bottoms and nylon pack cloth 12 inch uppers.1 size bigger then my shoe size.
Inside is Wind River waffle insole. A standard weight felt liner.
On my feet:
Wigwam Ultimax Liner Socks (Unisex)
MEC Product Number: 4003-526
Next:
Integral Designs Vapour Barrier Liner Socks (Unisex)
MEC Product Number: 5005-366
Finally:
Wigwam INgenius Hiker Merino Socks (Unisex)
MEC Product Number: 5001-651
Have tried them for about 12 hours total, snowshoeing, walking and in car. Outer socks and liners are bone dry. Lots of water on inside of liner and inner sock wet. Feet are very comfortably warm.
Comfortable to wear.
Coldest the temperature has been minus 5 so I'll have to see how this works on a cold day.  Inner sock and Barrier sock dry fast compared to the wool sock and the felt liner.
If anyone else has tried this system I love to hear and I will keep you posted when I get a cold trial.
Feb. 16, 2008 on the Budd :-*
Stay safe
OAF
“ We have this one life to appreciate the grand design of the universe and for that, I am extremely grateful.” Stephen Hawking. 1942 - 2018

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
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Offline Georgi

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2008, 11:06:48 pm »
Oaf, Happy Birthday to you! ;)

See you on that train or out in the bush somewhere....

I forgot to mention I also carry a set of Bama's and a second set of liners too. The 2nd set of liners are great when your doing morning chores like fetching firewood for the next few days or what have you and then you decide to spend the afternoon exploring the bush...One pair drying while the other pair is worn.

Here's a photo of those Bama's. Used to be carried by Marks W.W. but I don't see them available off the website.

« Last Edit: January 01, 2008, 11:10:39 pm by Georgi »
IN ICE WE TRUST ,In Snow we must, go camp in frozen Country. With axe and Saw for Timber is Law, to make our homes more comfy
;)



Georgi

Offline Rob

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2008, 10:51:32 am »
I go hiking, and hope to do some sledding, snowshoeing, Icefishingand a wide range of winter activities. Do I need a boot for all occasions? Is there one that would better suit a range of activities rather than specialize in just one?

I am looking at the Sorel line of products. They have one with a built in gator but the liner does not come out. How important is it that the liner can be removed?

If trekking and building up heat in the feat and then stopping for the night a -30 boot would not do on a night of -40 would it? So what temp rating should I be looking for?
Colder is better

Offline tonycc

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2008, 02:25:57 pm »
For winter camping, especially if you are cold tenting, removable liners are a must for most normal human beings.  (Rick, most definitely is not normal, and I am extremely jealous ;) )  Wet boots/liners will freeze solid during the night unless you do something to either dry them or keep them warm.  This is easier with removable liners.

Temperature ratings, are for the most part virtually useless for many reasons.  First of all, there are no standards (same thing with sleeping bags).  Second, everybody has a different tolerance to cold, and that can change through our lifetime.  Next, what you are wearing can impact it (cold feet? put on a hat!)  Lastly, it also depends on what type of activity you are doing.

For day hikes peak bagging in my mountaineering snowshoes I wear leather mountaineering boots.  Mostly, it is because many times I will have to switch between crampons and snowshoes depending on the trail condition.  I will wear either a liner sock (for blister protection) and a pair of Merino wool hiking socks, or two pairs of merino wool socks, depending on the temperature.

For general snowshoeing, cold tent camping, or cold weather activity I use a Sorel type The number and thickness of socks is tailored to the day's temperatures and planned activities.

I have seriously considered going with the system OAF described to keep the boot liners dry.  As wet as my liners get, I think it sounds like a great idea!

Tony

Offline ontariobackpacker

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Offline whitemtskier

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2008, 04:03:55 pm »
Socks..while I enjoy making my own..

the socks from http://www.northlandwoolens.com/  seem to be quite comfortable and come in a variety of weights.

They sure are warm!

Offline White Wolf

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2008, 09:15:41 am »
I wear a similar style of boot as Ontariobackparker but mine are made by Windriver.
http://www2.marks.com/productdetails.asp?categoryID=-99&terms=windriver&href=/ctwnew/markprod.nsf/ProductListByID/18A3BF7F11B54D858725720A002AC125?OpenDocument

Only thing I usually use a gaiter when snowshoeing . Boots seem to work ok and have been out in -40 temps with them. With no problems.

Georgi --Marks workwear web site I found to be a real pain , have the stuff they carry is not listed. So I tend to head over to the store (or call) and see if they have the items. Anotehr thing I noticed with Marks is one year they have a great item and the next it is no longer carried.

Offline Blaf

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2009, 03:14:18 pm »
This is a big problem for me. I have impression that as soon as I put my boots on they get wet. I use wool socks with Canadian Tire Kamik boots with removable liner. A cheap solution.

I want to understand better what you guys suggest here.

First layer: my skin
Second layer: liner socks
Third layer: Vapour Barrier liner socks (or nylon bags)
Fourth layer: wool socks.
Fifth layer: boot liner
Sixth layer: boot

I understand that the idea behind this is to keep wool socks and boot liner dry. But still my feet would be wet. I guess wet but warm. Is that something I should be happy with?
 

A lot of discussion about this here, but not really an answer. Unless it is cold and dry and I wear mukluk boots. 

Offline FlatbowMB

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2009, 03:45:50 pm »
Your skin can be moist as long as the insulation surrounding it is dry. Wearing VBL socks in pac boots will also help keep an already heavy boot from getting that much heavier.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2009, 08:56:26 am by FlatbowMB »

Offline Dukeswharf

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Re: Going Down - to the foot region!
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2009, 06:05:33 am »
Blaf,

You may find the following information on VBL of help:

http://www.warmlite.com/vb.htm

regards
Andrew