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Author Topic: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY  (Read 5020 times)

Offline Marko_Mrko

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Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« on: December 26, 2015, 07:32:02 pm »
Hi all,

So after the issues with the Kni-Co potato masher/stove cap, I took the advice and made a new one. Let me know what you think. Was gonna test it today, but rain. Will post again once tested. Also, I got 5 feet of the 1/4" mesh ($16).  If anyone wants some for this, message me and I'll mail 8" in an envelope.

Ingredients



REMOVING THE ORIGINAL POTATO MASHER (i.e. spark arrestor)
The KniCo stove cap is very light and effective as a stove cap, just not a spark arrestor.

1. Cut the original spark arrestor from the original stove pipe cap, so it's still usable. Note the creosote flakes that were the original problem (built up on the arrestor - even thin, they really blocked the outflow).


MAKING THE SPARK ARRESTOR Made from 1/4" wire mesh ($16 for 5 feet, from Home Depot), secured with 16Ga wire ($5 for 15 feet from HD).
 
2. Cut an 8" square (about 2" wider than the stove pipe on all sides). Cut the corners to make roughly circular. Even with really small wire cutters (as opposed to sheet metal snips), this was a quick job.




3. Shape the mesh into a bowl by pinching the corners with fingers.




4. Pinch down with needle-nosed pliers.


5. Check the fit in the stove pipe. I put mine in the lowest section, just above the flue. This (hopefully) makes the hot gas burn off the creosote, resulting in a self-cleaning feature.


SECURING THE ARRESTOR I do not want the mesh moving down to interfere with the flue, or rotating so that it loses its efficacy as a spark arrestor. The 16Ga wire will hold it in place.

6. Drill two holes (1" apart) on each side of the stove pipe (5/64 drill bit used for 16Ga wire). Make sure the holes are low enough so they don't interfere with the upper nesting stove pipe section, but high enough so they don't interfere with the flue movement.


7. Bend the wire in a squarish U-shape, with one arm a little longer than the other.


8. With the hand inside the pipe, first guide the longer arm and then the shorter arm through the holes. Make sure it actually goes through the mesh, not below it. Twist to tie off. Repeat on the other side.


Done!


Cheers,
Marko
« Last Edit: December 26, 2015, 07:37:08 pm by Marko_Mrko »

Offline jerryswiss

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Re: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2015, 07:44:58 pm »
Sweet Marko, great job. Love the "do it your self" stuff.
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Offline Marko_Mrko

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Re: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2015, 02:03:48 pm »
Thanks Jerry!

No rain last night, so I fired up the stove in the backyard. The pics were exposed for 15 seconds.

First, without the spark arrestor (and without the bottom flue section). Go sparks go!



Second, with the spark arrestor/flue. Flue was open wide. Obviously the chimney is a little higher, but the reduction in the sparks is huge. It's possible that not as many spark flew out, but I'd say the spark arrestor is doing a bang-up job. The few small spark that make it through would likely cool down by the time they went up the chimney and back down on my tent.



Definitely worthwhile using the spark arrestor... Lastly, a close-up of the little guy in action (he does get red-hot).


Cheers,
Marko

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2015, 02:29:26 pm »
Great work, look like it works really good!! I wonder how long it would last before burning out? I don't use a spark arrester, never did, but maybe I would try that for the shoulder seasons!

Offline hotelfive

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Re: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2016, 10:37:22 am »
That's a great idea I'm going to do that for sure.  How did you find it worked placing the arrestor in the bottom section of the pipe as opposed to the end?  Did the self-cleaning thing work? 

Thanks again for sharing the idea and photos!

Offline Marko_Mrko

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Re: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2016, 01:26:26 pm »
I've had five nights with the new spark arrestor, no problems with creosote (for the first couple of nights I disassembled the stove pipe just to check and make sure - nothing there).

I just took a pic of the mesh - see below. Haven't cleaned it or really touched it at all apart from storing and transporting.



Working well so far.
M

Offline HOOP

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Re: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2016, 06:09:22 pm »
Thanks Marko for showing the build and testing!   Keep that Kni-co cap!  You cut it in the right spot to retain those tabs, which will fit with friction and be totally universal for any pipe diameter or wind direction angle. 
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Offline kinguq

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Re: Improved Spark Arrestor DIY
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2016, 06:22:43 pm »
Looks good but I wonder if a spark arrestor like this will actually arrest many sparks?

Presumably a spark is "arrested" because it hits a piece of wire in the arrestor. But wire actually blocks a small percentage of the straight upwards path, which a spark in a chimney must be travelling, with this device. And sparks are generally much smaller than the gaps between the wires. So most sparks, or at least a high percentage, are going to fly right through this thing, aren't they?

Seems like a model like the ones shown here, http://fourdog.com/spark-arrestors/ , in which the spark cannot follow a straight path without hitting something, should be more effective.

Kinguq.