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Author Topic: Bringing or collecting wood?  (Read 3983 times)

Offline Coldfeet

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Bringing or collecting wood?
« on: November 20, 2016, 08:00:46 pm »
So how do you supply your wood to burn on your trips?  I've seen wonderful pictures and videos of wood piles next to the stoves or outside the tents. 
Here in New York and other states there is a 50 mile distance you are allowed to transport wood because of many environmental reasons. I do obey those rules to keep envasive species from spreading. So how the heck do you collect the right length wood for your stove boxes?
I figured that I would buy wood once near my site but then how about cutting it down to the proper length?  I imagine I could split it with an axe but shortening it?
I guess many get the wood split and sized up and haul it on sleds or car camping. 
Do you use a saw and cut certain lengths, split and dry it during the summer?  Just wondered how to do that because I'm using a small kni-co stove.  Thanks. Hope I explained my question.

Offline Hutchy

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2016, 09:05:08 pm »
Not sure I understand. Select a dead and standing tree, fell tree with a saw, buck to length, split to size if necessary, put wood in stove.

As for selecting a good tree to burn, may I suggest reading the book bushcraft, by mors kochanski
 



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Offline Undersky

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2016, 09:23:24 pm »
Hi Coldfeet, (Gotta love that handle!)

Most hot tenters in the Manitoba climate camp in places where there is standing deadwood that it is legal to cut & split. Typically you'd cut with a hand saw, then split with an axe. Some dedicated guys can't help themselves from scouting for dead standing tamarack or dead standing slow-grown black spruce during the summer & fall so they can plan to winter camp nearby. Also, google Earth is great for locating likely standing deadwood if the photo detail is good enough.

When going out after work on a Friday you're likely going to be in the dark by the time you're at your campspot, (my wife thinks I'm in the dark in other ways if I am blasting out to the bush, and not just heading home to a pizza on a Friday night, but that is another thread!) so some folks may bring enough wood on their sleds (say 1 cubic foot of processed wood) to have one hot burn Friday evening before tucking in to the sleeping bag. Then on Sat morning you're out cutting a few dry turns of wood in the bright sunshine!

In your neck-of-the-woods you may not be able to legally cut standing trees, so you may be in a bit of a dilemma.

If you have to bring in your own pre-processed wood, and you can't transport much distance, what about using some of the "compressed hardwood fireplace logs" or cutting scrap lumber to optimal length to fill small burnable small cardboard boxes (we use boxes that would hold 6 or 8 wine bottles). I'll bet it is not illegal to transport scrap lumber with no bark on.

Just some ideas.

 

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2016, 10:14:02 pm »
We sometime, especially if we know we'll get into camp late, we will bring a few stove loads for that night and the next morning. But usually we just collect wood like describe above, find dry tree, cut it down, buck it to the right length, split if needed... Shove into the stove!!
there is one place we sometime go that we are not allowed to collect wood, so we bring some and we travel a bit to get more as needed!!
 

Offline Coldfeet

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2016, 05:42:33 am »


If you have to bring in your own pre-processed wood, and you can't transport much distance, what about using some of the "compressed hardwood fireplace logs" or cutting scrap lumber to optimal length to fill small burnable small cardboard boxes (we use boxes that would hold 6 or 8 wine bottles). I'll bet it is not illegal to transport scrap lumber with no bark on.

Just some ideas.

Thanks Undersky, I never thought about bringing untreated scrap lumber.  I do use those mini paper covered logs as a fire starter.  Thanks for an idea.
I know bioguide collects wood during the summer but I'm app 250-300 miles away from those areas. 
I guess some untreated scrap wood from the local Home Depot precut would help.
The other day I smoked myself and my wife out of the tent, I rushed into buring to much wood with bark on it, cough cough.  thanks for tying to understand what I was trying to say.  Coldfeet

Offline chimpac

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2016, 08:50:45 am »
Packing wood in cardboard boxes is a good idea. Waxed cardboard boxes make very good fire starter. The boxes can be opened out and used as a ground covering or under your sleep mat.

Offline lonelake

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2016, 09:36:49 am »
I good understanding of tool use. The Knife, Axe, and saw are the tools you should be proficient with while Winter Camping with a hot tent.
Wood selection in the Winter can get a little tricky, so seek out information on that.
Dry wood tastes dry, like blotting paper, and knowledge weighs nothing.......

LL
Simplicity in all things is the secret of the wilderness and one of its most valuable lessons. It is what we leave behind that is important. I think the matter of simplicity goes further than just food, equipment, and unnecessary gadgets; it goes into the matter of thoughts and objectives as well. When in the wilds, we must not carry our problems with us or the joy is lost.
-Sigurd Olson

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Offline awbrown: N. Illinois, USA

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2016, 11:50:09 am »
I've car camped in places where cutting dead standing trees is a no-no and transporting dead wood is also illegal, so I have brought my own, ripped down the middle and sawn to the proper length, cheap 2x4's. I carry my prepared lumber in milk crates, which double as my seating inside the tent.

I also use some of the pressed saw dust blocks which I obtained at Menards.
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Offline Forse07

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2016, 11:58:02 am »
Packing in wood is out of the question for us because of the added weight. It can be a struggle sometimes in the BWCA as we are not allowed to cut and standing trees. Most of the time we are able to find enough downed semi dry wood near camp but there are times where we need to travel a bit to find some. Having quality tools is so important. We have invested in better tools over the years and it makes our wood processing much easier.

Offline Hutchy

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2016, 01:23:21 pm »
A challenge I am not used to for sure. Not being able to cut standing wood would seriously inhibit my ability to safely live outside in winter. Here, any tree within reason live or dead is fair game, either on my trap lines or  on crown land.

The laws that exist in some places do not mesh well with traditional winter camping. Good luck with your challenge, as the closer to the ground you get, the more moisture exists in the wood.

And nothing worse than wet wood when all you want is a hot fire and a good night's sleep.

Because I burn all night, bringing wood in with me in the amounts needed would not be possible. Not sure what else to tell ya.
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Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2016, 01:33:02 pm »
If you had to bring in wood it would be more efficient to use something that burnt fossil fuel- more BTUs for a given weight.

Riding Mtn National Park provides wood at the campgrounds for winter use and we raided the wood store at a skiers warming hut on one occasion. We loaded up the 10ft toboggan with logs and hauled them about a km back to where we were camped. It took two trips to stock our stoves for the weekend.
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Offline Forse07

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2016, 01:53:53 pm »
A challenge I am not used to for sure. Not being able to cut standing wood would seriously inhibit my ability to safely live outside in winter. Here, any tree within reason live or dead is fair game, either on my trap lines or  on crown land.


It can be a challenge at times but I understand why the rules are in place with so many people visiting all summer long. Camping away from the summer sites helps a little as we usually don't have any problems finding a couple downed trees leaning against live standing ones. I wouldn't complain if we had the same rules as your area though.

Offline brianw

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2016, 09:44:03 pm »
Coldfeet

I do as the others do and find dead wood (standing preferably) but usually leaning or already down.  For the first fire or two I usually bring in some pre processed construction grade lumber ( 2 x material cut down to 2 x 2 usually).  This will get me started and allow me to dry out any wood that I've collected on site and start burning that. 

As for processing wood, there are two main tools.  A saw and axe.  I made a youtube video a while back on the tools that I use for processing wood for burning in my woodstove. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gu2zkEwaNjk&t=1s

Cheers

Brian

Offline snapper

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2016, 12:30:03 pm »
While I don't want to speak on his behalf, I'm 99% sure the reason Bioguide goes out and preps his winter wood supply is because those of us who use NYS public lands aren't allowed to use any wood unless it's dead & down.  During the summer months he can easily see both of those conditions. 

For Coldfeet, and others like him (and me) who don't live close to their winter camping haunts, another issue we deal with here in NYS is the rule that firewood isn't supposed to be transported any further than 50 miles from its original source.  While I understand that this is to prevent the transport of potential invasive species (the Emerald Ash Borer comes to mind), between this and the "dead & down" rule, finding good quality firewood during the winter months can be difficult at best.  I think this is why Stewarts (a convenience store typically found in central NY up throughout the Adirondacks) does such a wonderful business in selling kiln dried wood like you'd find during the summer months at most campgrounds. 

That's all for now.  Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Bringing or collecting wood?
« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2016, 12:50:24 pm »
While I don't want to speak on his behalf, I'm 99% sure the reason Bioguide goes out and preps his winter wood supply is because those of us who use NYS public lands aren't allowed to use any wood unless it's dead & down.  During the summer months he can easily see both of those conditions. 

For Coldfeet, and others like him (and me) who don't live close to their winter camping haunts, another issue we deal with here in NYS is the rule that firewood isn't supposed to be transported any further than 50 miles from its original source.  While I understand that this is to prevent the transport of potential invasive species (the Emerald Ash Borer comes to mind), between this and the "dead & down" rule, finding good quality firewood during the winter months can be difficult at best.  I think this is why Stewarts (a convenience store typically found in central NY up throughout the Adirondacks) does such a wonderful business in selling kiln dried wood like you'd find during the summer months at most campgrounds. 

That's all for now.  Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper

Snapper, you are 100% correct and I find preparing the stashes very rewarding and time well spent in the spring woods. I just burned 3 of my stashes (I had 6) over an 11 day hunting/camping trip. The other 3 stashes are for this coming winter trips...hmm... I guess I have a problem now however; i.e. what will I do with all my "free time" while winter camping???