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Author Topic: Trekking Skis'  (Read 4717 times)

Offline into the wind

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2017, 10:26:23 pm »
Have fun Kelly!

Offline trapmusher

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2018, 05:46:37 pm »
O.K. stupid question time: What about making a treking skis out of an old pair of water skis?

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2018, 06:15:22 pm »
O.K. stupid question time: What about making a treking skis out of an old pair of water skis?

I don't see any problem doing that. Figuring out what/how to treat the base would be the biggest issue if at all an issue.

Offline Okanagan

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2018, 10:15:27 am »
Love what you are doing with these skis! 

I have toyed with building something similar out of two cut-down snow boards but they would be heavy and I am better with ideas than with execution.  Very tempting to me, though at my age I would not get a lot of use out of them.

 Could they be built with grip scales cut into the bottom?

 I keep thinking up ways to add retractable teeth, either passive wide tipped ones that slide back on forward motion and bite in if the ski slides back, or latch-down long teeth for uphill or side hill travel.   

Online kinguq

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2018, 10:38:56 am »
I keep thinking up ways to add retractable teeth, either passive wide tipped ones that slide back on forward motion and bite in if the ski slides back, or latch-down long teeth for uphill or side hill travel.

As you might guess there is nothing new about this idea and it has been tried in many forms over the years, including here.
https://tinyurl.com/y7urqayz

The problem is that they don't work well in soft snow (just like snowshoe crampons), and even when they do work there is a slight backslide with every step as the ski must slide backwards a bit for the device to grip.

I can't emphasize this enough: if you want to ski in the bush, get a pair of climbing skins. They change everything. Not just because of more grip: they also decrease glide substantially. In the bush, glide is usually a problem, not an advantage, because we mustn't hit trees on the downhill runs.

The trick, for me, is having the right balance of grip and some glide, which is achieved by changing the size of the ski skin. I use very narrow skins on my skis, about 1.5 cm wide, which I have cut down from wider ones. Works for me.

Kinguq.

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2018, 12:32:02 pm »
Again, listen to him, he got the right approach to it( same as mine lol)

Good info, great thread.

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #21 on: March 10, 2018, 12:32:32 pm »
I keep thinking up ways to add retractable teeth, either passive wide tipped ones that slide back on forward motion and bite in if the ski slides back, or latch-down long teeth for uphill or side hill travel.

I can't emphasize this enough: if you want to ski in the bush, get a pair of climbing skins. They change everything. Not just because of more grip: they also decrease glide substantially. In the bush, glide is usually a problem, not an advantage, because we mustn't hit trees on the downhill runs.

Kinguq.

I agree skins are key as I stated in another post: They "help tremendously on the incline and, more importantly for me, aid in maintaining a controlled descent." emphasis added....


Offline Okanagan

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2018, 01:13:29 pm »
I keep thinking up ways to add retractable teeth, either passive wide tipped ones that slide back on forward motion and bite in if the ski slides back, or latch-down long teeth for uphill or side hill travel.

As you might guess there is nothing new about this idea and it has been tried in many forms over the years, including here.
https://tinyurl.com/y7urqayz

The problem is that they don't work well in soft snow (just like snowshoe crampons), and even when they do work there is a slight backslide with every step as the ski must slide backwards a bit for the device to grip.

I can't emphasize this enough: if you want to ski in the bush, get a pair of climbing skins. They change everything. Not just because of more grip: they also decrease glide substantially. In the bush, glide is usually a problem, not an advantage, because we mustn't hit trees on the downhill runs.

The trick, for me, is having the right balance of grip and some glide, which is achieved by changing the size of the ski skin. I use very narrow skins on my skis, about 1.5 cm wide, which I have cut down from wider ones. Works for me.

Kinguq.

Great find on the ad for the sliding teeth/crampons!  :)

A fellow in New England is making a ski-shoe thing with teeth fixed in the bottom.  They are too small for my intentions.  As you say, nothing new, merely things that some of us haven't been aware of.   I'll most likely stay with snowshoes for my short forays. 

My cross country skiing was decades ago, over a four year period.  I just looked up some skins for skis and was amazed at how much they have advanced and improved since I used them.   Wish I could ski with you for an afternoon.   I'd learn a lot. 

 
« Last Edit: March 10, 2018, 06:10:23 pm by Okanagan »

Offline FlatbowBC

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2018, 11:18:54 pm »

I can't emphasize this enough: if you want to ski in the bush, get a pair of climbing skins. They change everything. Not just because of more grip: they also decrease glide substantially. In the bush, glide is usually a problem, not an advantage, because we mustn't hit trees on the downhill runs.

The trick, for me, is having the right balance of grip and some glide, which is achieved by changing the size of the ski skin. I use very narrow skins on my skis, about 1.5 cm wide, which I have cut down from wider ones. Works for me.

Kinguq.

I would image the other reason for limiting the width of full lengths skins (if if skins are worn while going downhill) is that the closer the skins would come to the ski edges, the harder it would be  use the edges to control the skis

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2018, 08:53:41 pm »
I head out for a day trip with my trekking skis.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_smQyR4l6w


Offline Okanagan

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2018, 02:34:07 pm »
How deep is the snow in the day trip video? 

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #26 on: March 12, 2018, 03:29:28 pm »
Snow in areas was ~2 feet with 4 - 6 inches of powder on a crust.

Offline kiggy

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2018, 04:02:57 pm »
lucky you. I am already missing winter

Offline Moondog55

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #28 on: March 12, 2018, 06:13:13 pm »
They remind me very much of my old TRAK  "Bushwackers" although those were a patterned base, short wide skis with very good grip and very little glide, and good at what they were designed to do. Bushwack

Offline trapmusher

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Re: Trekking Skis'
« Reply #29 on: March 13, 2018, 07:29:38 am »
Enjoyed the video. Liked the .410. The biologists seem to be coming to the conclsion, here, that the hare cycle no longer cycles. I haven't seem one in over 20 years. We don't have rabbits like we used to. I blame extensive logging and birds of prey. It makes it tough for a bunny to hide.