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Author Topic: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length  (Read 2425 times)

Offline Marko_Mrko

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2017, 10:18:47 AM »
The fly sheet is attractive, may try it.

It's impossible to do an angled pipe with the Atuk pyramid tent (the opening is very high).

Still no sparks with the baffle and no spark arrestor. I'm a convert.

Thanks for the help guys!
Marko

Offline Mercer

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2017, 05:36:12 PM »
Hey Marko, good job on the baffle.  I am glad to see somebody found my design useful.  Keep us posted on how well your setup works after a few trips.

Offline Moondog55

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2017, 06:22:42 PM »
I borrowed that mesh idea for my current project
I cut some stainless steel mesh from a broken bench top deep fryer drop basket I had lying around. 2 layers pop riveted in place I'll see how that works next Aussie winter

Offline koivisto

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2018, 05:49:51 PM »
Marko_Mrko,
[Also: first boil on the stove! Just as fast as before (about 15 minutes). The hottest part of the stove is still closest to the pipe (as illustrated by the excellent thermal pics in the original baffle topic).]

Does that mean in your test that your boil was no different timewise with or without the baffle? I was under the impression that guys were getting better and quicker cooktop temps by adding the baffle. I personally haven't had any problem with sparks but I would like to have morning coffee done quicker!  :D

Online chimpac

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2018, 10:38:20 PM »
A horizontal oriented stove body will never have a cook top hot enough for cooking. What does it tell you when the chimney is the hottest part of the stove, like most of the heat from all the wood you burn goes up the chimney. That is all a rocket stove does is send the chimney heat directly under a cook top and then make the smoke give up most of its heat before it goes out a chimney port lower on the side of a vertically oriented stove body.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 11:14:45 PM by chimpac »

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2018, 12:20:31 AM »
A horizontal oriented stove body will never have a cook top hot enough for cooking. What does it tell you when the chimney is the hottest part of the stove, like most of the heat from all the wood you burn goes up the chimney. That is all a rocket stove does is send the chimney heat directly under a cook top and then make the smoke give up most of its heat before it goes out a chimney port lower on the side of a vertically oriented stove body.

I've cooked for over 30 years on a regular tin stove, no baffle, no spark arrester, no pot cut outs, burning spruce, pine, willow, poplar, aspen, birch and always was successful with all my meals, form boiling water 10 litres at the time, cooking bacon and eggs while baking bannik, making stir fries, stew, pasta, roasting sausage, stakes, pancakes, crepes, making coffee, soupe, toast, fajitas etc etc etc.  All of that for 2 to 6 people in aa canvas tent that I can stand in, sit down, lay down, at temps as low as -40C/F with wind up to 70km/hr in the trees and above tree line all year around SO STOP TELLING PEOPLE THAt YOU CAN'T COOK ON A CONVENTIONAL TIN STOVE!!!
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 10:59:48 AM by AunNordDuNord »

Offline scoutergriz

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2018, 08:12:32 AM »
Yup. Same here! Cooked on a "horizontal" stove for almost 40 years, and my dad did for 20-30 years before that!

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2018, 09:12:19 AM »
A horizontal oriented stove body will never have a cook top hot enough for cooking.

WHAT??? Really? Confession time my friend; admit to your erroneous statement. You'll feel much better having done so... guaranteed. Your penance will be light.

And if you need any further convincing you can watch this video between the time 8:40 and 9:30. In it you will see and hear the transformation of raw onion's, red peppers, boiled potatoes (boiled up the day before on the horizontal stove) into golden brown hash browns. The frying of raw bacon to perfection (on the front area of a horizontal stove!) you can even see and hear it frying in the pan, then the frying of sunnyside-up duck eggs for a delicious mouthwatering breakfast...oh yeah, the water for coffee was boiled--- on the horizontal stove!!! No baffle either and it was -6 F outside. Don't overlook the vinyl door view!

Damn I need to get back out...

https://youtu.be/3U8VBj7R4fU?t=520

« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 09:57:45 AM by Bioguide »

Offline koivisto

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2018, 09:14:08 AM »
I have to say I'm with scoutergriz and AunNordDuNord on this one. My Snowtrekker large cooks everything I want just fine. I do not have an issue with the tent getting too hot either.

To be sure in winter camping--- waiting for the coffee to perk, listening to the perk, the fire pop and crackle while watching it snow in a silent wilderness makes that first cup all the better.

Online chimpac

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2018, 07:05:41 PM »
I have been thinking about penance and repentance. My summer stove is really  horizontally oriented, like it is wider than it is high. It can boil water as quickly as a gas stove for sure if I take the stove lid off and let the flames go directly on the pot. I get enough chimney draw with 40" of chimney, 12" of that chimney is below the smoke inlet where the stove hangs.
Maybe with the same features applied to a regular horizontal stove, there could be a big improvement toward a hot enough cook top, a cooler chimney, less wood burned, more heat saved, no spark arrestor needed. I have posted some of these suggestions before.
1. Completely tight baffle except for an exit hole near the front about an inch below the cook top. Maybe the baffle stepped down in the back so the chimney could extend down a bit into the stove.
2. A grate in the back of stove served with air coming under a raised stove floor.
3. If a baffle is air tight on all edges and the stove pipe extends down into the stove, the swing door that comes with most horizontal stoves opens to high and will let smoke out every time the door is opened.The best answer I think is to remove the swing door and make a new door jam with a vertical sliding door.










« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 12:20:29 AM by chimpac »

Offline rbinhood

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2018, 08:02:22 PM »
Chimpac, you are forgiven, my son. Now go and sin no more.

Also, try out those ideas you have to improve horizontal stove performance. You may be on to something. Until Copernicus came along, everyone thought the earth was flat.
"Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify."
Henry David  Thoreau

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2018, 10:02:29 PM »
Chimpac, you are forgiven, my son. Now go and sin no more.

Also, try out those ideas you have to improve horizontal stove performance. You may be on to something. Until Copernicus came along, everyone thought the earth was flat.

What do you mean the earth isn't flat... Damn it.

When I started in the dog mushing world 28 years ago, I was trying to find ways to make a better sled, changing things around and trying to make the thing "better"... and a friend of mine use to say north worth reinventing the "wheel"... I mean yes you might be able to make things better, but to what cost... There is always pros and cons to something, and sometime the benefits are just to the detriment of something else. I mean I'm sure that chimp stove works like he said it works, but it wouldn't work for us, not in our climate and not for the numbers of people we need to cook for! 

At one point there was a talk about cold air intake comping from outside the tent to the fire box of the stove to increase its efficiency, On paper it is all good, but in reality would it be that much beneficial in the "wall tent" set up?

Like back draft, front draft, dampers, adjustable baffle, cut out top for pots and there different pot rings and all the different configurations of this or that, they all have pros, but all have cons and in the end if it work for you great but keep in mind that it might not work for the neighbour!!

Online chimpac

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Re: Vertical stove pipe, sparks and pipe length
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2018, 11:10:32 AM »
Here is another idea that is maybe easier, better than a baffle. Use a can laying on its side as a combustion chamber inside a horizontal rectangular stove. It is easy to join the end of a can with a lid to a door jam and use a vertical sliding door. The can could be shorter than the stove so the stove pipe could extend down into the stove.
If a stove can not be taken apart to put in a can combustion chamber, a hole could be cut in the bottom of the stove for access.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 07:16:09 AM by chimpac »