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Author Topic: Breathing Into Your Bag?  (Read 995 times)

Offline hotelfive

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Breathing Into Your Bag?
« on: January 08, 2018, 02:35:42 pm »
I know this is a big "no-no" due to the amount of condensation you can introduce to your bag through your breath.  But if my bag has a draft collar (with the same DWR surface as the outter bag material) would the amount of condensation be minimal?  I assume I'd somewhat saturate that draft collar but I'm wondering how much would actually make it's way into the bag itself.  I find myself sleeping awkwardly trying to ensure my entire mouth is pointed up and out of my cinched bag around my face.  Am I being overly paranoid about trying to get absolutely no breath condensation into my bag?

Offline Bkrgi

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2018, 03:39:00 pm »
Only one way to find out for you and find the good or bad and if it is a compromise that is workable for you.
Start the experimentation.....in your awesome backyard

I have heard of people breathing into there down quilts and have no issues persay(think oneclick did that with his quilts).....I can see more frost build up on the outside but ???.
Worst case is more dry time come morning but a warmer nights sleep. Or it goes completely sideways(if Co2 content gets to high) but excessive moisture over one night, doubtful.
Either way with a hot tent one has drying time. Cold camping whole different ball game..
But a good tool to know its boundaries just for the sake of knowing
Living warm in North x Northwest BC
IMG-20161030-04037 by richardktm300, on Flickr

Offline 300winmag

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2018, 05:44:26 pm »
Wear a balaclava AND a face mask that covers your nose AND STAYS ON ALL NIGHT. The "Cold Nose Syndrome" is why you will unconsciously bury your head in your warm bag.

You can also buy a separate down filled hood from companies like Goosefeet so you can cinch your sleeping bag hood around your neck, avoiding getting your face inside your bag. The hood can be used around camp for more warmth as well, especially in the morning.

Eric B.

Offline FlatbowBC

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2018, 10:40:22 am »
In addition to what Eric said, adding a fur ruff (coyote, wolf or wolverine) to the hood will warm the air around your face and will be frost resistant

Offline kinguq

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2018, 11:04:00 am »
After struggling with this issue for years, I have started sleeping with my head under a fleece blanket. I have also used a fleece jacket, zipped and put over my head. Fleece is very comfortable to sleep under, and I don't feel claustrophobic or like I am being asphyxiated. In the morning it is frosted but it takes only a few minutes to dry by the stove. Works for me.

In fact I recently started using a sleeping bag cover of fleece that extends over my head. Keeps the bag dry.

Kinguq.

Offline Dave Hadfield

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2018, 02:06:56 pm »
These, Canadian Army surplus, are fleece-lined and extremely nice. No drafts down your back, and a warm fuzzy for you skull and face.

I further modified mine by extending the front rim about 2" using felt cut from a sorel insole.

Your outgoing air helps condition the incoming air.


Offline GearFreak

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2018, 02:12:21 pm »
---LONG LIVE THE CHICKEN HOOD----

Google Finbar hood if buying surplus is not your thing.


"Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not."

Dr. Seuss - "The Lorax"

Online Moondog55

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2018, 06:21:44 pm »
Alternatively google "Finnish Cowl"
These days I am forced to use a CPAP machine at home, so I am thinking that an exhaust mask similar to a skiers avalanche survival mask set-up might be handy in extreme cold. If you were very handy with thin alloy you could even make up a small heat exchange box [ assuming these were not something you can buy off the shelf;- those whistle things are too small to be really useful overnite I think] and reap major benefits.
Also you have to remember that the Balaclava we know now is not the original design, I always knew the modern iteration as a Scottish Balaclava; the original was a combination of a close fitting skullcap plus knitted in scarf that was long enough to wrap around the neck twice.
I still have my Damart Finnish cowl, style #001, long discontinued but still one of the best patterns for general use as a head and neck base layer but they do not pull up over the mouth and nose. I have long thought about making a LW windproof shell for mine but somehow I've never got around to doing so

Offline Bioguide

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Re: Breathing Into Your Bag?
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2018, 09:18:48 pm »
After struggling with this issue for years, I have started sleeping with my head under a fleece blanket. I have also used a fleece jacket, zipped and put over my head. Fleece is very comfortable to sleep under, and I don't feel claustrophobic or like I am being asphyxiated. In the morning it is frosted but it takes only a few minutes to dry by the stove. Works for me.

In fact I recently started using a sleeping bag cover of fleece that extends over my head. Keeps the bag dry.

Kinguq.

This guy has a good bivy bag idea to protect his down bag that has extra material to pull over his head to keep from breathing into his bag. A similar idea to kinguq I'm guessing. I made one using this guys pattern and a couple yards of Pendleton shirt wool you can by in bulk. The wool is nice and light and doesn't interfere with the bags loft at all. I like the bivy as if I get too hot in the down bag I can just have the light wool blanket over top and I don't have to worry as much about potential sparks from a fire/wood stove putting a hole in the bag.

Here is a link to the video: https://youtu.be/a0P7F5c2_8I?list=WL
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 09:28:08 pm by Bioguide »