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Author Topic: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?  (Read 2460 times)

Offline sito

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Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« on: January 08, 2018, 05:09:30 pm »
I found out about this Norwegian snow shoe.

http://www.fimbulvetr.no/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=cpc&utm_content=AD#!

is it better than North American brands? I have the Atlas Aspect snow shoes and it is very heavy. I feel tired whenever I walk in this snowshoes.

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2018, 06:26:51 pm »
There is a reason Norwegian don't snow shoe and that could well be it... They ski!

As for your Atlas, most modern snowshoes are design for packed trails and or alpine situation where most of the snow is windpack. There as been lots of demonstration that traditional snowshoes are way superior in real world situation where you would be in deep loose snow. They float better.


Offline Aarona

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2018, 10:30:45 pm »
Check out Northern Lites snowshoes. Really light and tough. I have used their biggest shoe a lot for forestry work and they beat out anything else traditional or modern as fas as efficiency. They're made in Wisc

Offline OBM

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2018, 09:28:29 am »
I use either 14X48 Faber Huron or GV Wide Trail. In deep snow and relatively flat terrain the traditional wood can't be beat. The 12X42 Wide Trails work well off the trail and really shine in hills where the crampons in the bindings add traction.

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2018, 11:16:06 am »
I use either 14X48 Faber Huron or GV Wide Trail. In deep snow and relatively flat terrain the traditional wood can't be beat. The 12X42 Wide Trails work well off the trail and really shine in hills where the crampons in the bindings add traction.

I'm with you regarding trad shoes, I tried many different snowshoes, I still have the biggest pair Tubbs make, and they are some thing like 10x 36 or something like that and they suck and they are noisy... I like my trad with try bindings... On and off in seconds and no need of my hands most of the time!


Offline memaquay

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2018, 01:25:21 pm »
I think a lot of the debate about floatation disappears after you reach a certain weight.  For instance, there is little difference in the the floatation, or lack of floatation, that I get between my five foot traditional alaskans and my 12 x 42 GV widetrails. I'm 230 right now.  When I was 170, I used to float pretty well on the alaskans.  If you are mucking about in the bush, breaking trail over deadfall, wanting to turn around lots, you will want to go with the modern snowshoes.  Most wooden snowshoes i have owned have broken.  My 10 x 36 GV's are 15 years old now and still going strong.  For prospectors, geologists and timber cruisers up here....you won't find many using traditional snow shoes, as they want to get home at the end of the day without major repairs.  Bridging blowdowns is one of the easiest ways to break wooden shoes, and a lot of times it must be done.

Offline FlatbowBC

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2018, 02:13:43 am »
Hi Guys,
This is my first post on wintertrekking.com  as FlatbowBC, although I used to post a few years ago as FlatbowMB. To make a long story short I move from Manitoba to BC about 6 years ago, and decided to get back on this forum.
When I lived in Winnipeg, my traditional huron snowshoes were ideal for both open prairie  fields and the Canadian Shield terrain. I preferred them over modern aluminum framed snowshoes for their better floatation and also they were much more quiet, which was especially important when using them for hunting. The cold dry snow that was encountered most of the time didn't demand a lot of maintenance of the rawhide coating.
Now that I live near Vancouver the biggest challenge I encounter is the wet snow conditions, which play havoc on the varnish coatings. The rawhide needs to be recoated after every 2 outings or so, which just isn't practical. I'm tempted to restring the frames with that monofilament.
 The traditional snowshoes have provided respectable traction on steep terrain - better than some modern snowshoes, but not as well as mountain specific modern snowshoes such as those by MSR. The lattice created by the rawhide as well as the texture from the rawhide wrapping around the wooden frame is surprisingly grippy.  I had recently purchased a pair of Atlas snowshoes of craigslist (for $40 😉) and tried them two weekends ago on a popular local trail that is notoriously steep, I had done this trail last winter with my traditional snowshoes (with difficulty), and found the Atlas snowshoes to be far less grippy (even with the modern bindings and claws). People using the various MSR models were getting good traction. I suppose I could resell the Atlas shoes quickly enough, then again may hang on to them to lend to friends.
This afternoon, I just received a pair of Altai Hok (125 cm) hybrid ski-shoes (with universal bindings) which I ordered last week. I'll be trying these out for the first time on Saturday on the same steep trail. I'll let you know how they perform. It should be a blast sliding back down the slope on them with a tiak pole.

Offline Caribou

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2018, 06:32:30 pm »
Hello FlatbowBC and welcome to the forum!

I know what you mean about course snow being hard on traditional snowshoe varnish. If snow conditions diminish like you describe, I switch to mono-line traditional snowshoes. Not to get into traditional vs modern (a little searching on this forum will bring lots of lively debates) but I'm pleased you found the traditional's the better choice. You can also get crampons for traditional (although I'm not a fan) or you can wrap a rope around the snowshoe to provide extra traction.

I guess the moderns have their place, particularly on established trails or hard snow, but, I prefer the traditional's.

Cheers,

Caribou

Offline FlatbowBC

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2018, 02:50:23 am »
Thanks Caribou!
Yes I'd agree rthat in most backcountry conditions, the traditionals will do better. On a situation where there is a group of about 6-10 people going up a series of switchbacks, and  you are the only one with traditionals, you'd be at some advantage for trail breaking but at a disadvantage when following in the broken trail (which would be most of the time with a group that size) because the traditional s don't fit neatly within the trench created by the others. The outside edges of the shoes lift and inside edges drop, making fot a very awkward gait.
It's funny how many stares I get using the traditionals on the extremely heavily trodden "snowshoe trails" in North Vancouver. Most people there have never seen traditional snowshoes before. Mind you those trails are so heavily trodden, that you could easily most of the trail with just boots.

Offline Bkrgi

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2018, 02:39:44 pm »
Using them snowshoes in these parts right now means your going to be post holing.
Even moderns are halfway to creating a post hole.
My Bear Paw's are sinking maybe 6" in the powder (I'm 140lbs dry)....moderns go down another 6" following....

I think that all the snowshoes have there place given the right conditions and no snowshoe is perfect in all conditions.
Moderns are great for harder snow, established trail or moderate snow levels.
Traditionals are perfect for deep fluffy snow were they are always in full contact with snow....not bridging gaps or logs etc and stressing them severely causing them to snap.
Last yr we had next to no snow and was eager to try the bear paws but really feared breaking them in doing so...so refrained from trying them.
This year now we have absolute perfect snow conditions for the bear paws or any traditional shoe. Moderns though are a big struggle breaking trail.
I would love to try some traditional Siberian skies(As shown by Lars at Survival Russia) with the horse hair (cause it is mostly up or down here in the hills) and see how they get about vs using the shoes 

Ultimately I think you need more than one tool in the tool box when it comes to snow shoes to get around the limitations of each.
Living warm in North x Northwest BC
IMG-20161030-04037 by richardktm300, on Flickr

Offline Fowler

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2018, 08:37:38 pm »
Comparing what appears to be a similar sized snowshoe to your Aspects (the Fimbulvetr Hikr), the later claims more bearing surface then your snowshoe for the same length (24") but I'd hate to think how either company calculates a non-solid surface area. The main difference is that the Hikr is listed as actually being a good bit heavier then your Atlas's at 4.7 vs. 4.1lbs. The Hikrs also claim a much heavier load rating, but I wouldn't take that at face value.

My local REI carries the Fimbulvetrs in several sizes, including some sizes that easily rival trad shoes for surface area, but my main complaint is the binding. I have not tried them outside the store, but I find that any binding that isn't close to a free pivot takes far more energy, the springy plastic interface between binding and shoe makes me nervous for strength and also seems to limit foot movement much more then most bindings.

I'm sure they'd have great traction in loose snow, but for icier spots I'd want a lot more metal underfoot then what they offer.

Offline BigUkey

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2018, 08:36:40 pm »
I have a pair of Atlas and decided to take a chance on the Fimbulvtr Rangr.  They did not disappoint!  I love 'em.  Stay flexible in very cold weather.  Tough as nails.  Good flotation (6'1", 235#) with no issues.  No issues with the binding.  If they are good enough for the Norwegian Military they are good enough for this Ukey.  Atmosphere.ca had them 30% off not too long ago.  That's my two cents. 

Online Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2018, 07:24:31 am »
Which model did you buy? Lasthunt has them at 40% off.
www.canoepaddler.net for custom made gear and fireboxes

Offline Old Guide

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2018, 09:50:57 am »
He bought the Ranger

Online Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Norwegian snow shoe Fimbulvetr ?
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2018, 11:09:49 am »
Sorry, should have read more closely. Small screens and aging eyes is my excuse.
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