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Author Topic: Atuk Alaskan  (Read 1762 times)

Offline Indy138

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Atuk Alaskan
« on: February 18, 2018, 03:11:30 pm »
So my wife and I are considering getting the 10x10 Atuk Alaskan tent. I like the idea of the single pole and simple design. Can anyone give me some pros/cons about this tent vs other styles?

Offline awbrown: N. Illinois, USA

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2018, 04:11:18 pm »
Compared to a Snowtrekker they are heavier, more difficult to set up and don't have as much room with the stove in the middle. That's the con's. However, they are less expensive. That's the pros.

I've never owned an Atuk tent, but I have met many folks at the Winter Camping Symposium who do and they all have dreams of moving up to a Snowtrekker.
I love winter......I don't look fat in wool!

Offline trapmusher

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2018, 04:28:03 pm »
I never even saw a Snowyrekker except on the net. However, it seems they have the same set up as a Eureka Timberline which I have. if so, setting up alone is a pain. Stupid poles keep falling apart.

I have an Alaskan. Love it. Stake out the corners, walk in with the center pole, stake out the walls. Easy to do alone.

The only con is that it isn't very big. I have the stove in the back left side.

It heats up very quickly. You can go from -30 C. to feeling dizzy pretty quick.

I have a thread here about my tent. There is also a thread here and a youtube video with tearknee and Shawn James that are well worth watching. If going Atuk, order NOW.  Guy is a busy guy (pun intended!) and once the outfitters/camps start placing orders it takes a while to get your tent.

Offline Indy138

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2018, 05:22:41 pm »
I never even saw a Snowyrekker except on the net. However, it seems they have the same set up as a Eureka Timberline which I have. if so, setting up alone is a pain. Stupid poles keep falling apart.

I have an Alaskan. Love it. Stake out the corners, walk in with the center pole, stake out the walls. Easy to do alone.

The only con is that it isn't very big. I have the stove in the back left side.

It heats up very quickly. You can go from -30 C. to feeling dizzy pretty quick.

I have a thread here about my tent. There is also a thread here and a youtube video with tearknee and Shawn James that are well worth watching. If going Atuk, order NOW.  Guy is a busy guy (pun intended!) and once the outfitters/camps start placing orders it takes a while to get your tent.

Thanks for the info, I went ahead and found the video too. Im hoping to order in the next month or so planning to use next winter.

Offline koivisto

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2018, 05:41:22 pm »
I looked at the Atuk as well but wanted more room.

I've got the Snowtrekker Basecamp 10'x13.' It's a big tent. On my first set up, I went into the house to grab something, came back out and my 14 year old daughter had finished setting up the poles. We threw over the canvas and voila! She's a smart and capable kid, but the point is that it's a pretty easy set up. I've set it up a bunch since by myself without issue.

Pros; Good use of space. Good stove placement. Easy set up. Good weight. Nice and light inside (except at night  :o)
Cons; Small three pronged male connectors for the junctions--easy to lose in deep snow, can be a pain to keep in while setting up (my solution below). Wish the pole pockets were a bit deeper. Wish they still had that big double zippered door.

FYI, I use a tent guywire to hold the two three pronged male connectors that insert into the poles. I run the tent guy from pronged connector to pronged connector with the ridge pole in-between. Holds the thing together for easier set up and you already have a drying line at the ridge of the tent when it is set up.

Good luck!

Offline mewolf1

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2018, 09:58:59 pm »
I've never seen one set up taut. Maybe it's the pilot, not the plane?

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2018, 10:15:18 pm »
I never even saw a Snowyrekker except on the net. However, it seems they have the same set up as a Eureka Timberline which I have. if so, setting up alone is a pain. Stupid poles keep falling apart.

I have an Alaskan. Love it. Stake out the corners, walk in with the center pole, stake out the walls. Easy to do alone.

The only con is that it isn't very big. I have the stove in the back left side.

It heats up very quickly. You can go from -30 C. to feeling dizzy pretty quick.

I have a thread here about my tent. There is also a thread here and a youtube video with tearknee and Shawn James that are well worth watching. If going Atuk, order NOW.  Guy is a busy guy (pun intended!) and once the outfitters/camps start placing orders it takes a while to get your tent.

Totally different than a eureka tent, and super easy to setup by one self! take all but 5 minutes at the most! In 30 minute in winter/snow condition, max 30 minutes and I have the stove pit dug out, the sleeping platform nicely packed and ready for spruce boughs and the stove is going!!

The cons of the Atuk is definitely the set up, more complicated to get a nice set up, the weight might be a cans, but with he new fabric and the hybrid Guy is offering I think it can actually be lighter. as for the stove, doesn't have to be in the centre, and I wouldn't have it in the centre my self.

Price is definitely a plus, cause they are a bargain! Quality seams to improve every year, the first one I saw was alright but nothing like a Snowtrekker, the second was slightly better, but I hear he as improve a lot in the last 15 years. 

Quite different tents so hard to really compare!

One thing for sure is Conical tents are warmer and easier to heat up than "wall tent" type, since you have less surface area and that heat stack down in the inverted cone shape. Especially true on an octagonal tent!

 

Offline trapmusher

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2018, 06:04:40 am »
I've never seen one set up taut. Maybe it's the pilot, not the plane?

I blame the plane. To do mine over, I would have additional loop sewn on the walls higher up towards the peak. When it snows  the walls close in.  As it is now, I added a few tarp clips and they help a lot.

My tent has been set up since September. We have crotch deep snow right now. I shake the walls free of snow and shovel around the tent on a regular basis.

Offline mewolf1

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2018, 07:50:54 am »
I've never seen one set up taut. Maybe it's the pilot, not the plane?

I blame the plane. To do mine over, I would have additional loop sewn on the walls higher up towards the peak. When it snows  the walls close in.  As it is now, I added a few tarp clips and they help a lot.

My tent has been set up since September. We have crotch deep snow right now. I shake the walls free of snow and shovel around the tent on a regular basis.
Thanks, that makes it a No-Go for me, regardless of price.

Offline memaquay

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2018, 08:06:39 am »
I had the Kanguk, because it was cheaper than the Snowtrekker.  I have a snowtrekker now, someone else has the Kanguk until they can afford a snowtrekker.  I should have sucked it up the first time. 

Kanguk - CONS -hard to set up, can't be tarped, center pole and center stove takes up lots of room, but mostly, hard to set up!!!!
PRO's-heats up quick, a few hundred dollars cheaper than snowtrekker, looks cool when set up well.

Snowtrekker - I can set up the 9 x 11 shortwall by myself in snow in under 15 minutes.  I can tarp it, which makes a difference in rain or snow.  I can put two cots beside each other (important for my wife). 

CONS - well, money is only money.  Quit drinking for a couple of months for the extra money, lol.

Offline FlatbowBC

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2018, 11:36:03 am »
I currently have a Snowtrekker, and have previously had a Kifaru 8 man tipi and a Black Diamond Megamid pyramid tent. If the ground was right (hard pack soil that firmly took stakes) the pyramid was probably a little quicker to get a basic pitch than th Snowtrekker. What I mean by "basic pitch" is something you can jump under for shelter before properly finishing and and maximizing shelter space and security. In any ground conditions such as granite, sand or deep snow, the Snowtrekker is far faster and easier to pitch than the pyramid or tipi. 

My Snowtrekker is 10x13 Exp Hybrid and I find it very quick and easy to pitch with this simple method: place three poles in the rear hub connector and let the ends of those poles rest on the ground like a tripod. Then throw the canvas over that tripod (the apex will be at a manageable height). Place the ends of the 'leg' poles in the rear corner pockets of the canvas and make sure the rear wall-roof corner of the canvas is aligned with the rear connector hub. Make sure the rest of the ridgeline of the canvas is lined up with the ridge pole. Finally, add the front hub connector and front leg poles, and you have a 'basic pitch'  with the canvas hung on the frame and ready for stake out detailing.
If you do things in this order, it is super fast and easy for one person to pitch even the larger Snowtrekker tents.

The only advantage the pyramids and tipis I had did have over the Snowtrekker was weight because they used nylon and silnylon fabrics, but if that weight advantage were taken away  (comparing canvas to canvas) the Snowtrekker is a superior shelter in terms of usable space, ease of pitching, more comfortable temperature gradients throughout the shelter when heated.

 The only thing I would change about my Snowtrekker (if I weren't selling it) would be to relocate the stove jack toward the rear and near the ridgeline (pretty much where the rear snorkel vent currently is. I like stoves with vertical (or at least near vertical) pipes that exit high through the tents. I believe that that this is far more stable, safe and energy efficient, but that is a whole other topic that has been flogged pretty heavily on this site

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2018, 12:33:37 pm »

The only advantage the pyramids and tipis I had did have over the Snowtrekker was weight because they used nylon and silnylon fabrics, but if that weight advantage were taken away  (comparing canvas to canvas) the Snowtrekker is a superior shelter in terms of usable space, ease of pitching, more comfortable temperature gradients throughout the shelter when heated.


Anyone ever considered making a synthetic Snowtrekker? Use the same poles but a nylon or polyester outer? It could be around 20% of the weight.
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Offline Moondog55

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Re: Atuk Alaskan
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2018, 04:22:35 pm »

The only advantage the pyramids and tipis I had did have over the Snowtrekker was weight because they used nylon and silnylon fabrics, but if that weight advantage were taken away  (comparing canvas to canvas) the Snowtrekker is a superior shelter in terms of usable space, ease of pitching, more comfortable temperature gradients throughout the shelter when heated.


Anyone ever considered making a synthetic Snowtrekker? Use the same poles but a nylon or polyester outer? It could be around 20% of the weight.

Like a Eureka Timberline 6?
If Eureka sold  spares; Frames and fly I think may people would have done it already