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Author Topic: Coleman Lantern  (Read 4658 times)

Offline Snowshoe

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Coleman Lantern
« on: January 13, 2008, 06:39:18 am »
Hey guys,

Does it make sense that a two mantle Coleman lantern will give twice as much heat and light and use twice as much fuel as a single mantle one?  Intuvitively, this should be the case, but does anyone know for sure?

Offline Sundown

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2008, 07:09:05 am »
Hey guys,

Does it make sense that a two mantle Coleman lantern will give twice as much heat and light and use twice as much fuel as a single mantle one?  Intuvitively, this should be the case, but does anyone know for sure?

It will, actually, be a function OF the amount of fuel being fed to the mantle (s)...

If the amount fed to the 2 mantle, is double that being fed to the One Mantle,
them twice as much heat/light will be created...

Although, a room will be lit brighter... warmed more efficiently... by 2 One Mantles... placed some distance from eachother...

Regards

Sundown

Offline scoutergriz

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2008, 09:28:58 am »
Actually that's not entirely true, Sundown. there is a lot more involved than just fuel flow- there's generator efficiency, air flow, fuel/air mix, size of the mantle, and size of the generator tip (oriface)
For standard coleman mantles and lanterns it's as follows-
#20- 100cp, #21, 21a- 200cp, #99- 350cp, #11,1111 500Cp
So you can see a model 220, which takes 2 #21a mantles will provide only 400 cp, where a model 236, which takes 1 #1111 will provide 500cp
If you really want to find out about Coleman lanterns, go here-
http://www.oldtownyucca.com/coleman/

Offline rogerrockmore

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2008, 02:46:16 am »
thanks for asking that one coz im also confused!









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how to buy skis? are there any restrictions? i wanna try freestyle skiing


 


Offline stealtrain

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2008, 09:22:38 pm »
might want to look at a brunton mantless lantern . less probs  when ur out an mantles are kinda a pain

Offline scoutergriz

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2008, 07:08:34 pm »
The Brunton Glorb has a few serious drawbacks for winter camping, The butane fuel looses pressure when cold eventually refusing to vaporize as the temperature drops below 31.1 degrees fahrenheit (10.9 for isobutane). Also the mantles are seriously fragile and quite often break during transport, if you use it in candle-mode (no mantle) it puts out less light than a ucco candelier

Offline Georgi

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2008, 10:11:13 pm »


Here's  the Coleman we use while out in the winter, It uses Coleman Fuel ( Naptha ) and it runs for the entire night without having to constantly pump it on a full tank. Don't forget to refill during the day light hours !!

Gives great light, single mantle, and fairly quiet for the rowdy tent we have in the evenings and compared to those propane beasts we've tried in the past.

Our normal evening hours would be that the day sun is setting and you need the light to start making dinner ( dark tent too ) , once its lit, it stays going until the dinner is finished, bantering begins, drinks are shared, lies are swapped and the last man goes tinkle before retiring, which usually is the early morning of the next day.

Aprox 9 hours burn time on a good night on Full.

FWIW, thought I'd reply being as I've now been bitten by the bug!!




IN ICE WE TRUST ,In Snow we must, go camp in frozen Country. With axe and Saw for Timber is Law, to make our homes more comfy
;)



Georgi

Offline jimdiane

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2008, 08:17:51 pm »
and it runs for the entire night without having to constantly pump it on a full tank. Don't forget to refill during the day light hours !!

Georgie, are you sure about that ??? I have an older single mantle model #325 and i really think it would need a few pumps every so often to get the light level back up. Mine seems to look similar to yours.

jim

Offline Georgi

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2008, 07:41:19 am »
As a Banter Boy, we joke about on pretty well everything, but when it comes to light, no joshing here.

I'd have to get a couple of believers out of the tent to speak up, but Jim you know our motto, last ones to go to bed at night. Only time we really need to pump is when the tank is just about out of fuel and the light flikers since the fuel/air mixture changes.

I don't recall when we usually put the light on but since the tent is made of dark fabric, you need light to cook dinner with. So , from the time dinner starts cooking to bedtime. Apx time is then 4:30pm to 1:30am. Again just an approximation, since there are times we call it a night before the tank runs out of fuel.

IN ICE WE TRUST ,In Snow we must, go camp in frozen Country. With axe and Saw for Timber is Law, to make our homes more comfy
;)



Georgi

Offline scoutergriz

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2008, 08:50:11 pm »
As an experiment one feburary night I lit my #236 lantern at 6pm on Saturday night- it was still going at 8am Sunday morning (12 hrs!)
I have several lanterns that will go for 6-8 hours without pumping.
I suspect if you're pumping it every few hours, you have some pressure loss somewhere -probably the fuel/air tube inside the tank. If this is plugged or the spring is weak you will draw the pressurizing air and fuel vapour from the top ofthe tank instead of drawing  liquid fuel only from the bottom.
You can find rebuilding instructions here- http://www.oldtownyucca.com/coleman/tech/re_1lant.htm
hope this helps

Offline Georgi

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Re: Coleman Lantern
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2008, 10:49:07 pm »
I should do the same and try out the lanterns I do have and see what their burn times are.
Better get some fuel, gonna be a fight of Kerosene versus Naptha.

Might have to make a pot of coffee too to stay up long enough??  ;D
IN ICE WE TRUST ,In Snow we must, go camp in frozen Country. With axe and Saw for Timber is Law, to make our homes more comfy
;)



Georgi