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Author Topic: Sled weight, runner depth?  (Read 638 times)

Offline kingjames_2nd

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Sled weight, runner depth?
« on: October 10, 2018, 03:41:10 pm »
Hello,

I'm looking to build an ice fishing shanty / accommodation.

My Area allows me to drive my truck up to a large lake (10x10km??  It gets covered in some pretty deep snow and generally does not freeze/thaw so it stays deep. 
the top develops a crust which can lead to a false sense of staying on top of the snow only to sink later.

What I'd like to do is build a portable sled that i can pull by hand/ foot and then un pack at my destination to have a shelter in which I can burn a wood stove for warmth and enjoyment.

Some of my considerations:

What is the maximum weight I can pull reasonably?  If the snow is deep, I imagine a flat bottom might glide over the surface better but I think runners will encounter less friction. 
If the runners are not tall enough I believe the sled wall will probably drag in the snow. 

I am imagining a hard walled fold up shanty that can be dragged like the one pictured here:  http://www.fishingbuddy.com/portable-ice-house-plans

But then i start to think about wood stoves and materials like canvas, and then my head starts spinning and I don't know what to do.


I'd like to be able to take my boots off and warm my feet by a wood stove.
I'd like to be able to lay down to sleep over night
I'd like to be able to fish through  hole in the floor.

Is any of this reasonable?   What would you do?

Thanks for your advice.







Offline kiggy

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Re: Sled weight, runner depth?
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 04:35:11 pm »
Hello,

I'm looking to build an ice fishing shanty / accommodation.

My Area allows me to drive my truck up to a large lake (10x10km??  It gets covered in some pretty deep snow and generally does not freeze/thaw so it stays deep. 
the top develops a crust which can lead to a false sense of staying on top of the snow only to sink later.

What I'd like to do is build a portable sled that i can pull by hand/ foot and then un pack at my destination to have a shelter in which I can burn a wood stove for warmth and enjoyment.

Some of my considerations:

What is the maximum weight I can pull reasonably?  If the snow is deep, I imagine a flat bottom might glide over the surface better but I think runners will encounter less friction. 
If the runners are not tall enough I believe the sled wall will probably drag in the snow. 

I am imagining a hard walled fold up shanty that can be dragged like the one pictured here:  http://www.fishingbuddy.com/portable-ice-house-plans

But then i start to think about wood stoves and materials like canvas, and then my head starts spinning and I don't know what to do.


I'd like to be able to take my boots off and warm my feet by a wood stove.
I'd like to be able to lay down to sleep over night
I'd like to be able to fish through  hole in the floor.

Is any of this reasonable?   What would you do?

Thanks for your advice.
I went over this route.
Built shelter like on your link- crazy heavy even to pull on little snow
bought Frabill Recon one men shelter- ok to pull on little snow- crazy heavy on deep snow, ( have to admit didn't use smitty sled,  I heard it makes it easy in deep snow)

better to modify Eskimo cube for stove jack. and use a train of icefishing sleds to carry it with floor insulation, cot, stove and wood to the fishing spot.

Offline Undersky

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Re: Sled weight, runner depth?
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2018, 05:56:39 pm »
This may be the cheapest and lightest pop-up shack you could easily convert to a hot-tent:
http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/clam-2-man-tee-pee-pop-up-ice-shelter-0787692p.html
and
https://www.wintertrekking.com/community/index.php?topic=4240.msg38451#msg38451
and
http://bwca.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=forum.thread&threadId=800396&forumID=116&confID=1
and
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hh2_DQDi7pw
Floor is 7 x 7 ft. Height is 6 ft-ish.
Quite stable in moderate wind if you peg out both peaks and both mid-wall pull-outs.
It has a door on each end. Pick the one with the zipper that opens at the bottom.
Unzip that and pull open both sides to make an open door that is about 2.5 ft wide at the base.
Sew a light canvas triangle into this space. Include a stove jack near the top of this addition.
Ensure that the stove pipe exits your tent at the highest possible point, and extends beyond the footprint of the tent.
You want the greatest vertical distance between the bottom of the pipe and the top so you get the best draft - some consider the pipe to be the engine of the stove.
Your total shelter package will weigh about 16 lbs.
This may be about as light as you can get for a quick-up shelter.
Pull it on an 8 ft runnered sled.
Smooth as split silk.

Offline rbinhood

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Re: Sled weight, runner depth?
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2018, 09:25:24 pm »
Unfortunately, the Clam Twin Hub is no longer being made. From time to time, you may be able to find a used one in good shape. I found one on Craigslist last year, but the Seller would not mail it to me, and eventually stopped corresponding with me.

Your list of needs could be satisfied by an Eskimo Fatfish pop-up ice shelter. They come in various sizes and weights. Windows are held in place by Velcro, so very easy to replace with a stove jack. I used a piece welding blanket, stitched some Velcro around the edge, and can pop it right in and out. I have slept in my Eskimo with a cot and a woodstove. Very comfortable, and it makes a great camping shelter that is very quick to set up and take down. At this time of the year, people are always selling used ones on Craigslist, usually at steep discount over new.
"Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify."
Henry David  Thoreau

Offline Hutchy

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Re: Sled weight, runner depth?
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2018, 06:22:53 pm »
A standard hot tent setup is line, lures and bait away from being a fishing shelter. I mean tent, toboggan etc. I have fished on the ice out of mine many times and overnighted a few times also. No diy needed. But do bring reflectors and use them overnight so a snowmobile doesn't hit you. That could ruin a trip in a hurry.

For strictly ice fishing however with no sleeping over I went and bought a Cabela's 10x10 insulated portable shelter. Really happy with it. It's just a bit faster to set up than my snowtrekker, and a tank of propane lasts me all winter.
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...