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Author Topic: Winter backpack  (Read 611 times)

Offline 300winmag

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Winter backpack
« on: February 22, 2019, 07:53:26 pm »
My old Dana Terraplane weighs 7.5 lbs. Much too heavy even for a large pack.

POSSIBLE NEW WINTER BACKPACK-> Osprey VOLT 75
* 4.5 lbs.
* 75 cubic liters -  a large pack
* zippered sleeping sleeping bag bottom compartment (a must for me)
* very adjustable harness (5" vertically and huge horizontal adjustment in hip belt padding)
* removable top lid compartment (for fanny pack on day hikes/ski trips
*excellent quality (I own an Osprey EXOS 58 snd it's top notch, as is my Osprey daypack)

Since I cold camp in the western mountains I need a large backpack. Wish I could take my pulk.

Any other suggestions?

Eric b.


Offline Hutchy

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2019, 06:54:29 am »
Unfortunately  it is about 15 liters short of what you want, but at well under 4 pounds this is my main backpacking pack.
http://www.badlandspacks.com/sacrifice-ls-bsacappr

Built for the mountains, I have take it all over, and lived in in in Cambodia for three weeks.

I have five Badlands packs and their unlimited transferrable lifetime warranty is the real deal. If it has a Badlands logo on it, they will repair or replace it for free, no matter what you did, forever. Most of them are meat haulers, so the packs will carry more than you will.

Is 60l too small?
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline Hutchy

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2019, 06:58:57 am »
Also, I had an osprey Atmos 65 for a while. I wanted to like it, but it always hunched me over.  As someone who doesn't hunch over but prefers to walk upright, I sold the silly thing. Sizing was correct for my torso length. I know there are a lot of choices out there, but badlandss fit me great.
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2019, 12:38:31 pm »
Lots of my friends that do 1 to 30 day treck use these packs and tents. they sometime have loads that are ranging in the 70+lbs. and they say that they are the best light weight pack made! There largest pack that is 84 litres is 3lbs.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 10:44:22 pm by AunNordDuNord »

Offline rbinhood

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2019, 03:09:17 pm »
ANDN---Whose packs are you referring to?
"Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify."
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Offline AunNordDuNord

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2019, 10:45:05 pm »
ANDN---Whose packs are you referring to?

Oops, a link would be useful.... https://www.hyperlitemountaingear.com/collections/packs

Offline h_t

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2019, 09:13:02 am »
packs are highly personal choice...

I am a big guy, don't move super fast and I prefer comfortable carry over a bit of weight trimmed from the pack.

I've been looking for a new pack in 65 L size and I like Atmos and Gregory Baltoro,
I prefer the latter from trying them on, but haven't purchased yet.
Baltoro had slight mods in 2018, so I was waiting for this model to go on sale....
They have larger size too.

Offline Stonehouse

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2019, 09:47:51 pm »
After a lot of years and a lot of packs, I recently switched over to a dedicated big game hunting backpack. So glad I did. Companies in this space include Kifaru, Kuiu, and Stone Glacier. I ended buying a used Stone Glacier and won't look back. That said, if a used pack from another manufacturer popped up first, I would've been okay with that.

Whereas most packs are engineered with the assumption that they'll be used to carry 40, 50, 60 lbs, these are designed to haul upwards of 100 lbs. I'm not saying they make it fun, but it makes a huge difference. For heavy and bulky loads, the Stone Glacier easily outclasses any other pack I've owned from any other manufacturer.

Don't know if your terrain allows it, but sometimes in the mountains I like to split my load between a small pack (bulky and light gear) and a kid's sled (heavy stuff). If I can't do that, for me it's the Stone Glacier.

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2019, 07:49:55 am »
I have an Exos for summer use and find it works fine for me though pack options are pretty limited in Canada and Osprey was the only option for a lighter pack that I could try on and return if I wasn’t happy. There are certainly cottage manufactured packs that are better.

How much weight will you be carrying? If you are not hauling a dead animal you should be able to stay below 40lb for a few nights.

If you didn’t want a bottom access I would say look at a ULA catalyst. Seek outside do make a big panel loader and a pack with a zipper running vertically from top to bottom.
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Offline Hutchy

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2019, 02:49:37 pm »
After a lot of years and a lot of packs, I recently switched over to a dedicated big game hunting backpack. So glad I did. Companies in this space include Kifaru, Kuiu, and Stone Glacier. I ended buying a used Stone Glacier and won't look back. That said, if a used pack from another manufacturer popped up first, I would've been okay with that.

Whereas most packs are engineered with the assumption that they'll be used to carry 40, 50, 60 lbs, these are designed to haul upwards of 100 lbs. I'm not saying they make it fun, but it makes a huge difference. For heavy and bulky loads, the Stone Glacier easily outclasses any other pack I've owned from any other manufacturer.

Don't know if your terrain allows it, but sometimes in the mountains I like to split my load between a small pack (bulky and light gear) and a kid's sled (heavy stuff). If I can't do that, for me it's the Stone Glacier.

Yup indeed. My badlands 2200 has hauled an entire bear out in one shot. Around 160 dressed. tough as nails
Used to be the man made the gear, now it seems the gear makes the man...

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2019, 07:09:31 pm »
You guys are tough. That kind of weight is going to seriously mess with your knee joints. I should start saving to the replacement surgery now.

But seriously, there is no reason you should be carrying that kind of weight on a normal trip, so why select a pack designed to carry such a load?

We are spoilt for choice when it comes to light and ultralight gear now so you don’t need to rough it to keep the weight down.
www.canoepaddler.net for custom made gear and fireboxes

Offline Old Guide

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2019, 08:36:44 pm »
You guys are tough. That kind of weight is going to seriously mess with your knee joints. I should start saving to the replacement surgery now.

But seriously, there is no reason you should be carrying that kind of weight on a normal trip, so why select a pack designed to carry such a load?

We are spoilt for choice when it comes to light and ultralight gear now so you don’t need to rough it to keep the weight down.

I'm curious BV...what  sort  of weight are you and friends pulling or carrying?

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2019, 09:48:09 pm »
We always pull in winter round here and often way too much. I would certainly not attempt to sling our luxury load on my back.

We do sometimes travel light for the fun of it.

My load for a quick overnight cold camping trip in December only took up two thirds of a 6ft by 1ft toboggan and I would estimate the gear weighed only 20lb though food probably weighed nearly half that on top! My tigoat stove would have added a few pounds if we had decided to take it along.

A summer load would be around be around 10-15lb without food or water.

I blew my knees out 25 years ago hauling big loads up Scottish mountains. I’ve put a lot of effort into making sure I put a lot less on my back ever since.

Picked up a copy of “Ultralight Winter Travel” by Lichter & Forrey over Christmas. I’m hoping some of the ideas within will enable me to keep exploring well into my dotage.
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Offline Old Guide

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2019, 10:03:05 pm »
BV...Thank You for the reply. You pack like I do more or less.

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: Winter backpack
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2019, 08:14:35 am »
Definitely a case of “more” when accompanied by my wife, but making sure she is comfortable is a small price to pay for having her come out in the winter.
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