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Author Topic: 2nd time out and still tired!  (Read 466 times)

Offline Coldfeet

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2nd time out and still tired!
« on: February 28, 2019, 09:28:12 pm »
Hopefully I'll figure out pics this weekend.

Went for my 2nd WT trip in NY Adirondacks with my buddy IndianChris.  His first trip across ice and my second.  Boy did I move up into leadership after Bioguide took me out last year.   Made sure we both had those safety ice picks and throw bag just in case.  Reviewed safety videos and said a few prayers before going out.

Well how gullible I am thinking how easy it was going to be like last years glass ice hauling trip.  uggggg.   Only 1/2 mile meandering trail from the car to the lake.   I was using the 9ft toboggan and chris was using the Paris pulk.  So on the small downhills I let my sled fly down by itself, that was nice, but when pulling it I felt the slack in the rope and realized I was being chased by a 70lb sled!   I was trying to run like Groucho Marx!   But I was post holing along the side of the trail!  That sled kept banging into my heels, uggg.

Made it to the lake, real happy and then I realized that our broken trail was gone, uhhh.  Well, being out of shape didn't help either.  (How does one get into shape to pull a sled in snow?)   There was about 5-6" of snow on top of the ice with app 1/4" of ice on top of that.   Didn't wear the snowshoes (strapped on the sled) and started to pull the gear. uggg.   Every 20-30 steps I stopped and sucked up some cool air.   Then looked ahead and went another 20-30 steps...  this kept on for 1/4 - 1/2 mile I'm guessing. 

A cool yellow plane flew over us and  tipped it's wings at us to say hello.   He probably did that because I was trying to wave hello but kept swaying back and forth from being tired.  hehe   Skipping more tiring and sweating parts, we made it to the North side of the lake where our site was.   Totally exhausted, didn't drink enough water and hungry we stomped down some snow and had to walk our empty sleds back across the lake, up the trail 1/2 mile to our cars for the wood that we purchased in a town a few miles away.   We didn't want to take a chance of not finding downed fuel.   We also brought in I think 8 biobricks to burn.  At the car it was time to eat (I left my food at the car knowing we were coming back, bad idea, I should have eaten a few hours earlier) Also drank some left over water in the car. 

Back down the trail, sled hitting me in the heels, across at least a partially broken trail, to the site then set up the tent, get stove going and rest my knees.  It was getting late and we didn't want to drill through the ice for water that night.  So, we ate, and ate and ate.   Moon was full and a bit cloudy, temps around 13f.  Monday it would be clear, and a chilly night around -2f.   

Next morning we went out to drill for water.  first time using an auger that was brand new and had a sentimental value to it.   finally after app 18" we broke through and got us some needed water.  It's amazing how folks survived and still do in those type of conditions, water, wood and food. 

We spent some time wacking along the edge of the woods and took pics of the open water and river.  I saw some snowmobiles across the lake and hoped they knew where the open water was for their safety.    While my friend was ice fishing I knew it was time for me to step up and break trail for our trip back across the lake.  Yep, did my WT forum readings and saw pics and watched videos.   I couldn't believe how tired I was just post holing across the lake.  We had gotton maybe another 3-4" that day on top of the other layers.   I took some video to show how smart I was , it would be a lot easier leaving the next morning, I hope.

Another lesson learned, BAD IDEA!  That night as we slept the wind gods and snow gods filled in my tracks :(   All you could see was the ridge marks of my snowshoes.  ahhhhh!   So another heavy pull across the lake stopping every 20-30 steps.   As I got closer to the other side I ended up stopping every 10-20 steps, thinking about bioguides Snowdog!   

We we got back to the trail and went uphill, my best best best friend Chris took over and hauled his sled uphill and came back and pulled mine uphill as I huntched over it and tried pushing it uphill as he pulled,that too was tough.

We made it back to the cars, loaded up and went on our ways back home app 300miles.   I was dreaming about so many different things but mostly how important it is to work as a team before the trip to get gear ready and not duplicate to many items.  work together while tripping and be honest with each other about one feels, both mentally and physically.  I was exhausted and realized that I need to slow down, drink more water and rest or something could go really wrong.   

I must say that I appreciate all of you for sharing your thoughts and experiences both good and bad ones so newbies like me can think about the What if's?  I know now that I was blessed my first time out hauling across clear ice and now understand how conditions can really change ones ability to move gear.  Oh yea, I did carry a small backpack and discovered much it wetted out my baselayer.   Another lesson learned, should have used my Osprey with the vented back.   Light pack wasn't worth it.   Oops, and I used an old narrow bag and a top bag, worked a bit but had to release the bungies to get to the zipper.  Looks like another BV order coming up! 
Health and happiness to all!  coldfeet

Offline Bioguide

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Re: 2nd time out and still tired!
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2019, 09:50:21 pm »
I enjoyed the write up Coldfeet. Sounds like a nice trip. I believe we were out at the same time just a few miles apart.

This short clip is for you: https://youtu.be/1qZMgLYiOH0

Offline Old Guide

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Re: 2nd time out and still tired!
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2019, 10:53:58 pm »
Hopefully I'll figure out pics this weekend.

Went for my 2nd WT trip in NY Adirondacks with my buddy IndianChris.  His first trip across ice and my second.  Boy did I move up into leadership after Bioguide took me out last year.   Made sure we both had those safety ice picks and throw bag just in case.  Reviewed safety videos and said a few prayers before going out.

Well how gullible I am thinking how easy it was going to be like last years glass ice hauling trip.  uggggg.   Only 1/2 mile meandering trail from the car to the lake.   I was using the 9ft toboggan and chris was using the Paris pulk.  So on the small downhills I let my sled fly down by itself, that was nice, but when pulling it I felt the slack in the rope and realized I was being chased by a 70lb sled!   I was trying to run like Groucho Marx!   But I was post holing along the side of the trail!  That sled kept banging into my heels, uggg.

Made it to the lake, real happy and then I realized that our broken trail was gone, uhhh.  Well, being out of shape didn't help either.  (How does one get into shape to pull a sled in snow?)   There was about 5-6" of snow on top of the ice with app 1/4" of ice on top of that.   Didn't wear the snowshoes (strapped on the sled) and started to pull the gear. uggg.   Every 20-30 steps I stopped and sucked up some cool air.   Then looked ahead and went another 20-30 steps...  this kept on for 1/4 - 1/2 mile I'm guessing. 

A cool yellow plane flew over us and  tipped it's wings at us to say hello.   He probably did that because I was trying to wave hello but kept swaying back and forth from being tired.  hehe   Skipping more tiring and sweating parts, we made it to the North side of the lake where our site was.   Totally exhausted, didn't drink enough water and hungry we stomped down some snow and had to walk our empty sleds back across the lake, up the trail 1/2 mile to our cars for the wood that we purchased in a town a few miles away.   We didn't want to take a chance of not finding downed fuel.   We also brought in I think 8 biobricks to burn.  At the car it was time to eat (I left my food at the car knowing we were coming back, bad idea, I should have eaten a few hours earlier) Also drank some left over water in the car. 

Back down the trail, sled hitting me in the heels, across at least a partially broken trail, to the site then set up the tent, get stove going and rest my knees.  It was getting late and we didn't want to drill through the ice for water that night.  So, we ate, and ate and ate.   Moon was full and a bit cloudy, temps around 13f.  Monday it would be clear, and a chilly night around -2f.   

Next morning we went out to drill for water.  first time using an auger that was brand new and had a sentimental value to it.   finally after app 18" we broke through and got us some needed water.  It's amazing how folks survived and still do in those type of conditions, water, wood and food. 

We spent some time wacking along the edge of the woods and took pics of the open water and river.  I saw some snowmobiles across the lake and hoped they knew where the open water was for their safety.    While my friend was ice fishing I knew it was time for me to step up and break trail for our trip back across the lake.  Yep, did my WT forum readings and saw pics and watched videos.   I couldn't believe how tired I was just post holing across the lake.  We had gotton maybe another 3-4" that day on top of the other layers.   I took some video to show how smart I was , it would be a lot easier leaving the next morning, I hope.

Another lesson learned, BAD IDEA!  That night as we slept the wind gods and snow gods filled in my tracks :(   All you could see was the ridge marks of my snowshoes.  ahhhhh!   So another heavy pull across the lake stopping every 20-30 steps.   As I got closer to the other side I ended up stopping every 10-20 steps, thinking about bioguides Snowdog!   

We we got back to the trail and went uphill, my best best best friend Chris took over and hauled his sled uphill and came back and pulled mine uphill as I huntched over it and tried pushing it uphill as he pulled,that too was tough.

We made it back to the cars, loaded up and went on our ways back home app 300miles.   I was dreaming about so many different things but mostly how important it is to work as a team before the trip to get gear ready and not duplicate to many items.  work together while tripping and be honest with each other about one feels, both mentally and physically.  I was exhausted and realized that I need to slow down, drink more water and rest or something could go really wrong.   

I must say that I appreciate all of you for sharing your thoughts and experiences both good and bad ones so newbies like me can think about the What if's?  I know now that I was blessed my first time out hauling across clear ice and now understand how conditions can really change ones ability to move gear.  Oh yea, I did carry a small backpack and discovered much it wetted out my baselayer.   Another lesson learned, should have used my Osprey with the vented back.   Light pack wasn't worth it.   Oops, and I used an old narrow bag and a top bag, worked a bit but had to release the bungies to get to the zipper.  Looks like another BV order coming up! 
Health and happiness to all!  coldfeet

Might have been tough, but tough lessons are the ones easiest to remember. Each trip gets easier and I know you had some fun too...and that's cool.

Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: 2nd time out and still tired!
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2019, 07:41:24 am »
Good to hear you got out, sorry it was tough.

If it makes you feel any better I had a hard time hauling my gear recently, same thing with new snow over a packed trail and for a while I was doing the same 20 steps, rest, 20 steps, rest. Snow is funny stuff and the temperature conditions and wind can make for snow that is easier or harder to pull a toboggan. Once I got into a more sheltered area things got easier but then once into the swamp the snow got way too deep so I had to pack a trail without the toboggan and head back for the toboggan.

Having to bring your own wood is tough. Not sure I could cope with that. You need to put a gps tracker on bio guide and steal his stockpile.
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Offline brianw

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Re: 2nd time out and still tired!
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2019, 12:30:18 pm »
I enjoyed the write up Coldfeet. Sounds like a nice trip. I believe we were out at the same time just a few miles apart.

This short clip is for you: https://youtu.be/1qZMgLYiOH0

That is just salt in the wound, Bioguide.  ;-)  I love it.  LOL

Cheers

Brian

Offline GearFreak

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Re: 2nd time out and still tired!
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2019, 04:03:04 pm »
The problem with this winter camping thing is that the gear is heavy.  Take your normal backpacking load, even at my luxurious style is about 45lbs, and add another 40 lbs of tent and stove.  Add extra warm clothing, base layers, and up the weight of the sleeping system and your adding another 10lbs.

So we now have 90 lbs on a sled.  if you don't split that tent load with someone or concentrate the load on a smaller pulk its going to be a beast. 

Now,  toss in tent setups like these,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOtfXw6G5SU and you have easily upped the weight to over a hundred lbs.  Add ice fishing augers, photo gear, blah blah blah and you need a dog team, snow dog, etc to get backcountry!

Anyways, Coldfeet, as to your original post.  Best way to train for these excursions is to stay active all year around.   Hiking, biking, backpacking will all keep leg strength up and the other thing is cardio.  Breaking trail is key when faced with deep snow.  Chris and I have walked out ahead and then returned to haul the sleds.  Watch your elevation profiles and always try and prescout your locations in advance and even prep a camp (as Bioguide does) prior to make your chores easier.

Look forward to your video and I believe you post on that traditional Winter Camping FB page as well. 

     

 
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Offline Bothwell Voyageur

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Re: 2nd time out and still tired!
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2019, 04:40:08 pm »
Forgot to say, I have seen pictures of some of the arctic explorers dragging a semi tire to train for sled hauling.

Probably a bit over the top for what we do.



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Offline Coldfeet

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Re: 2nd time out and still tired!
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2019, 08:27:37 pm »
bio!    Ouch!   That was tough to watch!   Thought you were going to somehow post my "Queens" video, haha.

GearFreak, that is an awesome gathering,  I would love to check that out some time.  I used to hake a lot 10 years ago but bad knees (left knee replacement) has slowed me down, but I'm still going at it, just not as much.

BV, yea big problem with wood, and there is no way I'm looking for any hidden stash!  Probably booby trapped.

OldGuide- your exactly right, wish I was doing it all over right now.

I actually though about  getting some wood delivered to the site from one of the snowmobiler's  (for future trips)   Is that a word?