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Author Topic: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove  (Read 878 times)

Offline recce

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Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« on: December 24, 2019, 09:20:40 am »
I’m using a Snowtrekker tent and stove combination and I’m looking for any tips or tricks for set up in deep snow.  Typically I set up camp and stay put and this leads to some snow melting around the stove after hours of heating. 
Do people dig kitchen wells or put the stove directly on the packed snow?  Any tips like that to allow the stove to be set up for a couple days and also eliminate punching through the snow when stepping into the tent.  I’ve followed Craig MacDonald’s instructions and wondering if there’s a simpler way to approach this.  Thanks.

Offline brianw

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2019, 11:05:46 am »
Greetings

If you watch some of HOOP's older winter camping youtube videos you'll see he uses a couple of 'skid' logs threaded through the legs of his stoves.  This will allow them to float over any melting that the stove heat creates below the stove.  Snowtrekker also sells a heat reflecting stove mat that can be placed under the stove to minimize this melting. 

As for the post holing through the snow inside the tent, if you area allows it, you can create a floor from bows from evergreen trees.  This is fine in the deep backcountry but is not allowed in provincial parks.    Using the 2'x2' interlocking foam mats can be used to help create a warmer floor and to minimize post holing.

Cheers

Brian

Offline chimpac

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2019, 02:37:36 pm »
The radiant heat a stove gives off is important to use as much as possible.
The stove is shining this radiant heat out in every direction. I think it is best used if the stove is elevated to be at the centre of the campers bodies sitting around it. In this position it will be up off the snow to make melting less. A bakers aluminum pan placed up off the snow under the stove lessens the melting by reflecting heat.
Most stoves are hot enough underneath to broil food.
The stove legs should be placed on long sticks that bridge the melting part right under the stove.
My cook stove hangs on my chimney so the chimney sits on a long stick bridging the melted snow.

Offline yardsale

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2019, 08:14:35 am »
Can't recall how to post photos but search "meltback from stove posted on 5/27/18 for my strategy.   Three of four contact points with the snow are outside the heated space and are quite stable. The forth is sufficiently away from the stove that it doesn't melt much. I put a piece of foil on top of the pole end to further reduce movement.  Works well.

Offline recce

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2019, 10:41:17 am »
Thanks to those who responded.  I appreciate hearing the different ideas.

Offline Forse07

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2019, 11:22:57 am »
We always set up directly on the ice and start by trampling down the snow with snow shoes. Once the tent is set up we do shovel out some of the snow but its important to make sure there is snow between the tent and ice. As far as the stove we bring a couple sections of 1/8" plywood wrapped in tin foil and it does wonders for preventing melt. We also find a good dead tree where we can easily remove the bark and we lay the dead bark in the area of the tent where we will be stacking out firewood. This has been a nearly flawless system for us as we have greatly minimized any ice melt and it keeps all of our firewood dry.

Offline sleddawg

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2019, 01:18:50 pm »

I've done it both ways but prefer to dig out the stove area so the stove is on hard ground.  Obviously if you have over three feet of snow pack this is a little unrealistic but you have to make a judgement call here.  I tend not to go for much longer than four or five sleeps, it's not too difficult to mitigate melt back with the above mentioned reflective options.  My stove is a home built as well and the legs keep the stove about a foot off the ground.  If the available wood is on the damp side I will be drying under and beside the stove.
I, haul the sled so therefore I am "the" dawg.....

Offline Jawax

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2019, 06:25:40 pm »
I’ve set up a few times in deep, sugary snow and it was pretty tough but I managed.  After I “do ciarcles” to pack down my pad I go off to find and process wood while the snow sinters.  It often isn’t well set by the time I’m done with wood so I usually just leave my snowshoes on while setting up.  It’s sort of annoying but better that punching through.  I don’t dig out anywhere - just use the loads and sections of 10 inch flashing under, in front of, and along side the stove to reflect up radiant heat.  They fit easily in my stove bag. 

The flashing keeps the melt to a minimum over several days and postholing seems not an issue by the second day. 

Offline chimpac

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2019, 07:31:22 pm »
I like to use 7” pole barn nails for tent pegs in all times of the year. I just need 4 for a tarp pitch. They can be driven into frozen ground and pulled out any time if they are first hit to break the frost bond between the nail and dirt.
In deep snow they can be put through the tent then into a piece of fire wood then bury the wood under the snow in the right place.

Offline UphillHarry

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Re: Deep Snow Set Up Questions-Snowtrekker Tent and Stove
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2020, 09:11:22 pm »
I use the Snowtrekker heat reflective mat and under that I use Reflectix.  If I'm car camping I'll put rolled Reflectix over the entire floor with a tarp over it (the Reflectix is super slippery combined with snow).  If going into the back country I'll bring less Reflectix.  It pretty light weight, but bulky.