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Author Topic: Telemark ski bindings  (Read 2741 times)

Offline redneckdan

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Telemark ski bindings
« on: January 19, 2010, 10:02:22 pm »
Hey yall.  I'm relatively new to winter camping but I'm a telemark ski patroller and know a fair piece about skiing equipment.  I'm posting a quick review of the most common bindings this year.

Black Diamond O1- I ran these on a set of black diamond kilowatts with scrapa t-races and also tried t-3s.  even with the super stiff springs these bindings are not very active at all.  I now have them mounted on a set of rossignol powder birds with the mid-stiff springs, running the scarpa t-3 boots.  I rate them at just above a g3 targa as far as activeness.  However, the free pivot touring is awesome.

22 Designs Hammerhead-  With the Bishop Bomber side lined for the near future this is the binding the hard charging telemarkers should look for.  Put a set of stiff springs in them, set the activeness on position 5, buckle up tight your scarpa t-races or black diamond customs and lay some tele trench.  With 6 screws instead of four its nigh impossible to rip them out of the ski.  They also are rather efficient for touring if you remove the activeness adjustment slider.  Not as free as the O1 when touring but very close.

22 Designs Axel-  This combines the best of both the hammerhead and the O1, only sore spot I can find is its a little harder to get into free pivot mode than the O1 but thats been trivial so far.  For the hard charging resort rider I would still recommend the hammer head over the axel just because of the fact there are fewer failure modes than with the axel.  So far I have not seen a stiffer spring kit.  The stock springs work fine on my kilowatts, but on the fatypus alottas at 140mm underfoot a little more power would be nice. 


In summary....for 99% of what I imagine most of us would ski on a hut trip or a backwoods forray the O1 with the mid-stiffs is the slick ticket...once you get steeper than your average green ski run something with a little more capability may be nice.  Once you get into this type of stuff...no question about it, go with the hammer head or the axel.


Offline chimpac

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Re: Telemark ski bindings
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2010, 01:18:04 am »
 Your post is over my head technicaly. It looks like in the picture you are skiing steep powder.
 I would like to hear an outline of the different types of skiis used for touring and crosscountry.
 What is best for different types of skiing, eg. off the trail , steeper travelling

Offline chimpac

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Re: Telemark ski bindings
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2010, 01:29:22 am »
I am reading recent posts and did not see the next threads which covers some of my questions.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2010, 01:31:25 am by chimpac »

Offline Tomd

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Re: Telemark ski bindings
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2010, 02:02:32 am »
For all things tele, including endless discussions and reviews of skis and bindings, including the new NTN sytem boots and bindings, the best place I know of is www.telemarktips.com

I don't recall reading about anyone here using tele gear since most of the campers are on snowshoes or light BC gear and towing big sleds or pulks through primarily flat or slightly rolling terrain.


Offline yardsale

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Re: Telemark ski bindings
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2010, 06:31:25 am »
I fear that the bindings redneckdan describes favor down hill performance over touring ease. They are heavy, expensive, and difficult to repair in the field when they break. One binding which tours fine and Tgives some downhill performance when you want it is the Vole 3-pin cable binding. This is a standard heavy duty 3 pin binding plus a cable around the heel to give more turning control. If you are consistently touring, just take the cable off. If the cable does happen to break (I have never had one do so) the binding remains functional due to the three pins.

Some light tele and randonee skis might be useful for pulling sleds due to their great flotation. They won't track well on icy conditions due to their large sidecut, however.