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Offline norton

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New member
« on: September 07, 2010, 02:07:25 pm »
I'm getting back into cross country skiing after 30years and have found some great information on this site so I thought I'd introduce myself.

I started cross country skiing when I spent a year in Sweden in the mid seventies.  I was stationed on a mountain in Germany when I was in the army in the late seventies and did quite a bit of cross country skiing there and then moved to northern Illinois and have done very little since.  I looked at starting again a couple years ago, but my boots had disintegrated and I couldn't find anything I liked.  I've also done downhill skiing occaisionally in the past, but not recently.

I've heavy into camping and canoeing with my kids' boy scout troop and have been up to the boundary waters for canoe trips a number of times, have gone on week long backpackin trips several times and have gone winter cold camping in northern Wisconsin with the scouts four or five times.  I pretty much have all the equipment and clothing needed for winter cold camping.

Anyway, after finding the article on ski equipment on this site I found a pair Alico leather boots marked down on Sierra Trading Post in just my size.  They were what I had been looking for for years, I really don't like the ones just suitable for on track skiing.  Then after receiving the boots I found some U.S. army surplus Asnes skis at Coleman Military Surplus http://store.colemans.com/cart/us-gi-cross-countrydownhill-skis-2-pair-p-2120.html for $20.  I'm 6'2" and 190 lbs so I got the 200 cm pair, I hope thats right.  I ordered two sets of voile back country bindings, one to put on my old cross country ski's for on track skiing and one with removable cables to put on the asnes for backcountry.  I also got a set of the black diamond traverse poles, they now have a longer size available.  So now I just have to get the bindings mounted and skis waxed and I'm ready to go, only four or five months until there's snow.

Where I live in northern Illinois we don't usually get a lot of snow even though it gets pretty cold.  I'm hoping this year we get quite a bit like last year, or that I can hook up with some people on this forum for trips up to Wisconsin.

Offline yardsale

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Re: New member
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2010, 08:03:02 pm »
Set up sounds fine. They are waxable I suspect.  Chat with a local shop about waxing basics and wait till the snow flies!

Offline HOOP

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Re: New member
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2010, 10:10:05 pm »
Hi Norton,

Welcome to Wintertrekking!  Sounds like you have found some incredibly good deals for getting back into BC skiing.  Well done!   That deal on the US army surplus Asnes skis is a major score!   I would suggest painting those white skis a brighter colour to find them in the snow!   ;D.  I would be interested in how they perform.   Asnes are known for having a better stiffer camber for kick and glide than other BC skis designed for downhill turning (which tend to be soft and can't hold a kick wax). 

Good choice on the Alico's and the Voile's.  I don't think you will be disapointed.  Top quality!

You will find when you get back into it that waxing skis yourself is preferable.   So while you are on a spending spree ( :)), if you don't have the stuff already, I might suggest getting a hot wax iron, scrapers, glide waxes, and of course a cork and selection of kick waxes for various temperatures, AND, a pair of either kicker skins or full length skins for grip for hauling sled or touring in deep powder.   Black Diamond has the kickers.   You can also buy ski bench components, or make your own.  The ski bench greatly aids in waxing.   Man, I can't wait for the snow!   
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker

"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline norton

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!
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2010, 12:17:48 pm »
Hey, I only bought them because they're white!  ;) It's like I'm invisible.

I hope they have a stiffer camber, I was torn between the 210 and 200.

I don't know how often I'll get to use them so I don't want to invest in all the waxing stuff up front.  I plan on having the shop put a good base on and then trying to maintain it myself for the season.  I saw the ski bench on the site here, if I'm using them a lot I'll look into it.  I didn't get skins because It may be awhile before I get to really use them for backcountry camping and there aren't many hills around here, I can always get them later.

I did get a call about teaching cold weather camping to adults in the local boy scout counsel the other day.  The course includes a January campout so I may get to test my set up with a fully loaded pulk then.

I was surprised at how familiar this set up was.  The skis, boots and even the bindings with cables are not too unlike what I originally learned downhill on over 40 years ago.  I'm thinking of taking them up to a a ski hill near Wisconsin Dells to try them on downhill.  With the metal edges they may work better than modern downhill skis on the 0ver used icy slopes.

Offline yardsale

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Re: New member
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2010, 05:05:00 pm »
I don't know about pulling a pulk just with waxed skis, even on flat ground if there is any soft snow around. Don't think you will have enough purchase on the snow. Skins may be necessary. You can get some "snakeskins" cheap as real climbing skins will cost you more than your skis did! You could also try lacing some line under the bottom of the skis to create traction but you will eliminate any glide with this (or the snakeskin) option. Hoop, what's your  thought about this?

Offline HOOP

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Re: New member
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2010, 11:49:04 am »
I don't know about pulling a pulk just with waxed skis, even on flat ground if there is any soft snow around. Don't think you will have enough purchase on the snow. Skins may be necessary. You can get some "snakeskins" cheap as real climbing skins will cost you more than your skis did! You could also try lacing some line under the bottom of the skis to create traction but you will eliminate any glide with this (or the snakeskin) option. Hoop, what's your  thought about this?

Hi Yardsale,

I am not familiar with "snakeskins" (?).   But for my needs, I find that I really, really like to have the kicker skins with me for hauling sled.   If the snow is soft, deep and shears, then I find I need skins, otherwise I slip.   Sometimes in deep powder without a load, I slip with my kick wax or waxless scales, and I put the kickers on and it makes progress with a sort of glide possible.   I have also been on spring crust where wax is shaved off in minutes, and scales could not grip, and without skins I would have been walking.   So yes, I recommend having a set of skins. 

I also recommend buying some skin glue for between trip touch ups.  I have fouled up my skin glue with kick wax (you are supposed to scrape off all kick wax before applying the skins, but sometimes I get lazy :) )
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker

"I firmly believe that far from hurting the planet, the growing knowledge of Bushcraft is helping our natural world. When we employ bushcraft skills, it may seem as though we are consuming natural resources.  But of course, the more we learn about the trees, the plants, the animals around us, the more we respect them. The more we respect them, the more we cherish them, the more we nurture and take care of them. That is the underlying principle of Bushcraft.

Offline yardsale

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Re: New member
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2010, 08:03:13 am »
Here is some information on Snakeskins  http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19962

They work ok, but their chief advantage is you can buy them cheap.  I don't have kicker skins but I'll bet they would work just fine for this application. You should be able to apply skins over any wax colder than blue extra. If not, perhaps the skin glue is too thick on the skins.

Offline norton

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Re: New member
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2010, 05:05:56 pm »
Since I was paying so much for shipping when I bought the skis I got a pair of $9.95 ski climbers at the same time. http://store.colemans.com/cart/gi-ski-climbers-p-870.html

I wasn't sure what I'd get but they seem pretty good.  They fit the skis perfectly and look like mohair skins that strap on instead of using glue.  I'll try them before I buy anything else.  I don't think I'll need them very much around here anyway.